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Psychological Priming and Availability Heuritic are both concepts within Social Psychology and Behavioural Psychology. Although I can see where you are trying to make a link here, and there could be times where both are at play, Psychological Priming is different to Availability Heuristic. Psychological Priming Priming is a nonconscious form of human ...


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There's a short straightforward answer, and a more nuanced answer. The short answer is that people were randomly assigned to the two groups. Any baseline differences between people will be equally likely to affect both groups. Will there still be differences? Absolutely. This is why researchers use statistical inference to rule out the possibility that ...


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This should be rather easy to find on google scholar, especially with the recent replicability crisis in social psychology. In particular, Bargh and Cesario has a few things to say in 'defense' of priming. You can start with Bargh's article, which is a response to this article by Bower. Cesario's article is here, and for an overview of the whole issue ...


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For the sake of "Hail Mary" answers: there's a recent (2016) paper by Ruch et al. claiming unprecedented results: Subliminal influence did not significantly decay if probed after 25 versus 15 min. This is unprecedented evidence of the longevity and impact of subliminal messages on conscious, rational decision-making. You could try to replicate their ...


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Excuse my english, I'll try my best to explain. The key concept here is "randomization", which involves randomly allocating the subjects across the different groups. If randomization is well done, this ensure that your groups are "equivalent" on all other factors that have not been explicitly accounted for in the experimental design. Thus, in theory, there ...


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This is potentially an example of a top-down influence on the visual system. That is, if the experiment demonstrates as expected, that priming the visual system with a word influences the pattern of eye movements (compared to not priming) when free-viewing the following object, then that would support the conclusion of a top-down mechanism at work. In ...


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Your hypothesis is true, priming can affect human behavior in many different ways. Specifically pro-social behavior can be encouraged by simply displaying an image of a pair of eyes. We examined the effect of an image of a pair of eyes on contributions to an honesty box used to collect money for drinks in a university coffee room. People paid nearly ...


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