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6

A fear of heights on buildings is very common because there are natural vestibular and vertigo responses within certain height ranges. Furthermore, the effect is heightened if you're exposed to the elements out on a balcony as opposed to within the building. Fear of flying is almost always related to the sensations of landing and taking off. If you've ...


5

A rather cursory search brought me to the wikipedia page for fear of children: Pedophobia: [The] fear of children, fear of infants or fear of childhood [..]. This as opposed to a pathological love for children, or pedophilia, which as an ongoing sexual attraction to pre-pubertal children. In case it is a fear specifically for infants, there is a more ...


5

As far as I know, there is no specific definition for this phobia. No search reveals anything similar. It is important to recognise that simply defining phobias is not medically useful and does not provide further insight into human cognition. It would not be efficient to provide a label for all the phobias which exist. Generally labels are created when the ...


5

The word "Oikophobia" has several different definitions. In psychology, it usually means an aversion to home surroundings, or to objects in the home. However, the British philosopher Roger Scruton coined a new meaning, which is exactly what you are looking for: The disposition, in any conflict, to side with 'them' against 'us', and the felt need to ...


4

I wouldn't call it a disorder, unless it significantly affects your life. Not enjoying music or not being able to produce music is known as "amusia". It probably has to do with differences in perceiving pitch [1]. It can also occur in people with recently fitted hearing aids or cochlear implants [2]. If you are interested in this, there is a chapter about ...


3

Studies have been done to see how technology can alleviate social phobia, by communication through the net. (Yen et al 2012) Heavy use increases (general) anxiety: (Anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory.) "Logistic regression analyses indicated that heavy Internet use is associated with high anxiety; high cell-phone use is associated to ...


2

First, a major caveat: a less-than-30-second video clip of Monk in a particularly stressful context is insufficient basis for trait judgments, according to trait theory, which defines traits "as habitual patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion. According to this perspective, traits are relatively stable over time" (Kassin, 2003). Since this clip doesn't ...


2

Witkowski has written several articles reviewing NLP (2010, 2012) and in each case has found few studies that indicate clear support for the technique. He also argues that the articles which indicate no support for NLP are generally of stronger methodological quality than those which do not. The fast phobia cure is not directly mentioned in either paper. ...


2

Those are different phobias with different names: Acrophobia- Fear of heights. Altophobia- Fear of heights. Batophobia- Fear of heights or being close to high buildings. Aviophobia or Aviatophobia- Fear of flying. Pteromerhanophobia- Fear of flying. In fear of flying is fear of loosing control, fear of not trusting someone else. In fear of heights is ...


2

A quick lit scan suggests evolutionary advantage to being afraid of spiders and snakes. Unclear what causes this mechanism: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2001/10/1004_snakefears.html Social conditioning also likely plays a huge role here. Spiders in our society are seen as evil / scary (via Halloween, movies, etc.). This unconscious bias makes ...


2

Humans are most comfortable with those things that resemble themselves, both in terms of physical features and mentality. A dog, for example, may have an extra set of legs and a tail, but does not differ all that significantly from humans or other mammals—we can similarly see ourselves in the behavior and apparent emotions they exhibit. Arachnids, on ...


2

The DSM-5 criteria for Specific Phobia are: A. Marked fear or anxiety about a specific object or situation (e.g., flying, heights, animals, receiving an injection, seeing blood). Note: In children, the fear or anxiety may be expressed by crying, tantrums, freezing, or clinging. B. The phobic object or situation almost always provokes immediate fear or ...


2

Coulrophobia is a fear of clowns. It is a phobia not (yet?) acknowledged by the WHO or the APA as a disorder. Nonetheless it seems to be an accepted phobia in hospitalized children (Meiri et al, 2017). The Guardian has a very interesting popular scientific account on the causes of coulrophobia. The author brings up the following two convincing arguments ...


2

Exposure therapy is the most effective treatment for phobias (it has been found to be more effective than cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, and insight therapy). It's important that the therapist break down the steps into a hierarchy of exposure exercises. Initially one can change various dimensions to be less intense by increasing the proximity to ...


1

Although not a clinical diagnosis, in research on social media the term "Fear of Missing Out" (FoMo) is often used (Przybylski et al., 2013): Defined as a pervasive apprehension that others might be having rewarding experiences from which one is absent, FoMO is characterized by the desire to stay continually connected with what others are doing. ...


1

This specific phobia doesn't exist, but I think that the symptom you described could be part of a Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia) According to DSM-5, a criterion for the diagnosis is: "Marked fear or anxiety about one or more social situations in which the individual is exposed to possible scrutiny by others. Examples include social interactions (e....


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The answer can be found from evolutionary psychology. We are wired to feel fear when we encounter stimulus that look like spiders and snakes. Evolutionary psychologists argue that much of human behavior is the output of psychological adaptations that evolved to solve recurrent problems in human ancestral environments Spiders and snakes were major ...


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According neurological perspective, Amygdala is involved in pleasurable emotional learning as well as fearful emotional learning. awareness of the aversive nature of stimuli is sufficient to guide our actions. We avoid dangerous neighborhoods or shark-infested waters, not mainly because we have been attacked by sharks in those locations, but instead ...


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