30

In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the diagnosis of “homosexuality” from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) (Jack Drescher, 2015). Theories of pathology which declared that some internal defect or external pathogenic agent causes homosexuality, have been rejected, such as the theories of immaturity ...


11

Whilst there have been arguments for the idea that homosexuality has a genetic base or a result of malformations of human development, today's consensus is that homosexuality is a normal variant of human behaviour (e.g. Gonsiorek, 1982) [not resulting in — or a result of — psychological disturbances or maladjustment], and therefore it is not a mental ...


7

Not by the standards of the DSM-IV-TR. Other answers discuss the case of homosexuality specifically, but the general principles of psychiatric diagnosis also rule out the idea of homosexuality as a mental disorder. The DSM-IV-TR characterizes a mental disorder as "a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or pattern that occurs in an ...


7

The idea that homosexuality is disadvantageous from an evolutionary perspective is, in my view, an example of how cultural bias is confused with biological process. While there is evidence that sexual identity has some genetic basis, it is certainly a complicated feature of our identity that cannot be explained by a single gene, and should not be ...


7

Upon closer examination, it appears that Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria is a term that was coined by Dr. William Dodson to describe the phenomenon of rejection sensitivity in ADHD sufferers. It does not appear to be a 'valid' term, in the sense that there is no DSM definition. In fact, it seems that Dodson himself is the only one to have used the term. Dodson ...


6

To add to these great answers, I'll go on and link to this article. It discusses the DSM (as mentioned in other answers), but also includes a discussion of the homosexual classifications in the ICD (which is maintained by the WHO, as opposed to the APA). The ICD is much broader than the DSM, though. "It is distinguished from the DSM in that it covers health ...


6

Most of your list fits for symptoms of lack of will to cooperate. Lack of will to cooperate is likely triggered by lack of sympathy, which again may be triggered by lack of trust. I say 'may' because there are several possible reasons that such situations may occur. Lack of will to cooperate may also be due to personality traits, especially due to low score ...


5

I don't think you can rule out that she really is suffering from headaches and dizziness. Just because the doctors can't find a physiological cause doesn't mean that there isn't one.


5

DID is one of the most controversial psychiatric disorders, with no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria or treatment. To answer your question on why MPD was renamed DID, for completeness, there is a bit of history to bear in mind and we will look at the versions of the DSM over the years and how things changed. The DSM-II used the term Hysterical ...


5

You might want to look at Bondü, R. & Esser, G. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry (2015) 24: 185. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-014-0560-9 The authors found fairly compelling evidence of a latent construct of rejection sensitivity associated with ADHD in a large (>1200) German sample of adolescents. This existed independently of another interesting ...


5

As the Wikipedia article on psychopathy makes clear, there are different definitions of psychpathy – and in fact there are different definitions of every scientific concept –, depending on which scholar you consult. This is not a problem, as every scientific publication will make clear which definition it uses. The truth is that there is an ongoing ...


4

The beginnings of theories based on attachment regarding long and short term interpersonal relationships is Attachment Theory which was started by John Bowlby. Attachment Theory is primarily applied to studies in relationships concerning children, even though it was expanded in the 80's to include adults. In attachment theory, as highlighted in the link ...


4

Dodson distinguishes "RSD" from social anxiety in that the latter begins as an anticipatory fear and is generally lessened upon social interaction whereas the RSD flare-ups begin as in-the-moment perceptions of an important social rejection and have emotional consequences that unfold from there. (See this slideshow and accompanying video.) I do not believe ...


4

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a complicated diagnosis to understand and treat. A painful mix of emotional trouble, unstable relationships and self-destructive behavior, including suicide attempts are associated with BPD. Experts have given a new name to BPD as Biosocial disorder. People who develop BPD are highly emotional, sensitive and reactive,...


4

Far from being simply encoded in the genes, much of personality is a flexible and dynamic thing (Mischel & Shoda, 1995) that changes over the life span and is shaped by experience (Roberts, Walton, & Viechtbauer, 2006). Can Personality Be Changed? by Dweck After searching for related case studies, this is the closest I could find: "Deathman, age ...


3

The question is why sometimes we report certain psychiatric conditions as being discrete (henceforth categorical) and sometimes as being dimensional (or in a spectrum). The answer is related to the history of psychiatric classifications. By the time DSM-III was designed, there was an increasing resistance to psychoanalysis in America. Psychoanalysis tended ...


3

The difference is in consistency. Bipolar disorder there is usually episodic; quick, drastic changes between normality, mania, depression and anger. ADHD on the other hand is chronic and affects attention and behavior rather than mood. Anger is of course a symptom but usually only situational. Over a period of time, bursts of anger and other moods can be ...


3

Yes, there is almost certainly a genetic overlap between schizophrenia and OCD. Quantifying the overlap in variation requires genotyping a large number of individuals, and a lot of this cross-disorder work is done by consortia. The Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium estimated the genetic correlation due to common polymorphisms ...


3

I believe there are some minor differences, for example, WebMD Article states: A key difference between a psychopath and a sociopath is whether he has a conscience, the little voice inside that lets us know when we’re doing something wrong, says L. Michael Tompkins, EdD. He's a psychologist at the Sacramento County Mental Health Treatment Center. A ...


3

For something to be a disorder, it must of itself cause a negative outcome for the individual. (As an aside: "...there is a recurring theme among men who live a homosexual lifestyle that they had an absence of a father figure and attempt to overcompensate..." Evidence required, please?) "...as gay couples can not generate offspring..." This statement ...


3

There may not be one: it is impossible to conclude with confidence that personality disorders are, or are not, mental illnesses; there are ambiguities in the definitions and basic information about personality disorders is lacking. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11823318/ Mental illness in general isn’t about mood, either. Mood only covers mood ...


2

There is a clear definition of what a personality disorder is. The Wikipedia article on Personality Disorders lists the criteria given in the DSM-5 and ICD-10. Take a look: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personality_disorder If you don't understand those definitions, please edit your question accordingly.


2

A personality flaw can be a trait or behaviour that is conscious and the person usually has control over it, whereas a personality disorder is a long enduring pattern of defensive behavior that lies outside of the persons control, because they are not are not aware of it. A person with Borderline Personality Disorder will use splitting and projection to ...


2

Psychopathy and the MacDonald triad Just keep in mind that psychopathy is often used as a more popular term for the characteristics of Anti-Social Personality Disorder (Davey, 2014). The three behaviors described by the website were indeed studied in the scientific community (see MacDonald). First of all, this research was retrospective and descriptive ...


2

The skill of understanding that other people have different knowledge, beliefs, etc, falls under the concept of theory of mind (note that the name is possibly a bit misleading...it's not referring to some scientific theory or to philosophy of mind but rather to this ability to understand that others have different minds). Difficulties with theory of mind ...


2

Yes. For example, people suffering from DID can also suffer from depression. See DID Since, by definition "dissociative identity disorder is characterized by the presence of two or more distinct or split identities or personality states that continually have power over the person's behavior. ... ", then the other disorder (e.g. depression) can be unique ...


2

This picture in her talk (which is very good, by the way) refers to the study about amygdala hyperreactivity - see below. Essentially the picture shows fMRI scan differences between controls and borderline patients when looking at neutral, happy, sad and fearful faces. Neutral faces and fixation point were used to transition between the exposure blocks to ...


2

There is an answer to a similar question regarding narcistic behaviour and negative feedback reaction: How can a narcissist be given negative feedback without triggering aggressive behavior? It is a more general answer. The case you described has surely a lot more facets and details to consider. I would have just commented it, but I don't have enough ...


2

An article on the NCBI website states Many clinicians are reluctant to diagnose personality disorders (PDs) during youth, viewing paediatric personality deviations instead as reflective of given developmental stages. This is so despite evidence that certain youth are indeed at risk for the eventual development of PDs as adults. Unfortunately, late ...


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