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My hypothesis: The world accidentally stumbled upon the first (to my knowledge) bi-stable color illusion Here is an example of bistable illusion: This bistable illusion involves the perception of motion. Is the dancer spinning clockwise or counterclockwise? The deal is that the image is actually ambiguous. But you can't possible perceive both clockwise or ...


11

The source I have quoted below gives an example of the following stenographic image:- Is this perception a particular trick that my eye performs or is it processing the visual data in an alternative way? Stereograms can be viewed as three-dimensional images by providing two side-by-side views of a three-dimensional scene, rendered from slightly ...


9

This is a type of illusory motion (or motion illusion) called the Enigma Illusion. The cause of motion illusion in general is not well understood, but research suggests that there may be slightly different reasons for the different types of motion illusions. A common theory is that particularly high-contrast colours are perceived separately in the retina (...


8

Seems this is a newly discovered phenomenon! Tangen, Murphy, and Thompson (2011) describe this as a result of their method of presentation: alignment of the pupils and fast cycling through faces with different proportions. It is also important that the cycle of new images remain uninterrupted. They say "relative encoding seems to drive the effect," and list ...


6

The most well known sensory after effect illusion in the auditory system is probably the Zwicker tone (Zwicker, 1964). If a white noise with a half‐octave‐band suppression placed anywhere from 300 to 7000 Hz is presented at an over‐all sound‐pressure level of about 60 dB for 1 min and then switched off, a decaying, poststimulatory sound similar to a pure ...


6

Without references, you state: In this picture if you noticed her rotating clockwise you are right brain dominant. We discourage asking questions on this site (or in science in general) which are based on unverified/referenced premises. However, given that this is a very common notion found online, I will try to answer your question by first helping ...


5

There is an interesting demonstration in this YouTube video (4:10 minutes) by Jean-Francoir Gariépy which shows a difference in the color perception depending on whether the dress is scanned from the top to the bottom of the image or vice versa. A conclusion from this could be that people scan pictures of dresses in different ways, although an individually ...


5

No. This disorder requires the sufferer to have used hallucinogenic substances in the past: Previous use of hallucinogens by the person is necessary, but not sufficient, for diagnosis of HPPD. For an individual to be diagnosed with HPPD, the symptoms cannot be due to another medical condition. from Wikipedia following the DSM-IV criteria reproduced ...


3

Short answer The Rubin Vase is a visual illusion, which can be traced down to the way the visual system analyzes visual scenes in terms of objects and background. Inattentional blindness is not an illusion, it is the failure to detect stimuli when the mind is focused on something else. It has to do with the limitations in the capacity of the visual system to ...


3

I can't zoom in on the picture, but what I see is bleeding from one color into the next along the diagonals (most evident in the green to blue and purple to red transitions). Are you saying that they are not there when you zoom in? I would think that because there is a gradient in the color transition, the gradient has to be emphasized in an angled meeting, ...


3

Nick's answer links to the very interesting geometrical discussion by the authors, but they leave out some background. The color after-image phenomena is best described by opponent-process theory. The basic idea is that the neural systems representing color have a competitive nature. So the system that codes for red and green is the same system and cannot ...


3

Very cool image! As for your question, your link includes a link to the authors' poster, which allows you to "read more about the illusion and possible explanations." From the poster: In conclusion, the observations so far suggest that the afterimage effect is not due to higher level effects of shape-specific coloured afterimages but rather to a rapid ...


2

Mark Changizi proposed another level of understanding this illusion based on the "Perceiving the Present" hypothesis. Here is the explanation: Optical illusions are actually a result of our brains trying to predict the future. When light hits our retina, it takes about one-tenth of a second for our brain to translate that signal into perception. ...


2

Gestalt is a German word without a direct translation into English. (Reeves, 2013) The Oxford English Dictionary states that Gestalt is a noun in Psychology, meaning “an organized whole that is perceived as more than the sum of its parts”, with a 1920s origin in German, literally meaning “form, shape”. (OED, n.d.) With “formation and destruction cycle” ...


2

Dependent on your definition of an illusion, there is truth in your claim. A definition of an illusion is: [A] perception, as of visual stimuli (optical illusion) that represents what is perceived in a way different from the way it is in reality. But then - what is reality? First off, Bach-y-Rita famously proclaimed, 'We don't see with our eyes, we ...


2

The waterfall after-effect is an illusion falling into a broader class of visual illusionary apparent movements caused by watching a constant motion for an extended period of time. The motion after-effect can be explained by adaptation of visual neurons that respond selectively to movement. Motion-sensitive visual neurons are tuned to a specific direction. ...


2

To what category of optical illusions does this image belong? This appears to be a modified Hering illusion or rather it seems to rely on the same principle: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License: Wikipedia 2018. There are several possible explanations for why perceptual distortion produced by the radiating pattern. The illusion was ascribed ...


2

Looks like these are variations on the Hermann grid illusion, wiki page here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_illusion As the wiki page notes, the first-pass explanation of this was lateral inhibition, but this is not really 100% satisfactory. There's a nice quick walk-through of the old explanation and the problems with it here: http://web.mit.edu/bcs/...


2

There is no difference between the two; illusionary movement and motion are interchangeable terms. For example, a definition of apparent motion is (Oxford Index): A sensation of movement in the absence of actual movement, [for example] visual illusions [...] And a definition for apparent movement (Psychology Dictionary) is: [A]n illusion of motion or ...


2

Here’s an image I found that triggers tristable perception (as opposed to just bistable perception): The three possible interpretations are A big cube with a smaller cube in front of it A big cube with a small cubical chunk missing A room with a small cube sitting in the corner Apparently there is a fourth possible interpretation, but it is so “unlikely” ...


1

Short answer According to a study by Boutsen et al. Thatcherization of objects (houses in this study) did not reveal the Thatcher effect, while faces did. Background The Thatcher-face illusion (Fig 1) is, in my opinion, not really an illusion. Instead, it is a phenomenon where in-congruent features are more apparent when observed in their normal everyday ...


1

The distinction that you draw between "instrument"/eye and brain is not particularly clear, and to some people it makes more sense to think of the eye as part of the brain. Regardless, let me try and summarise some visual limitations and their causes. Our visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are limited by the optics of the eye (e.g., the lens), the ...


1

My understanding is that the eyes are actually quite poor in terms of providing the brain with a clean image. Perhaps the only areas where eyes are better than cameras are with simultaneously viewing light and dark together (high-contrast), being quite fast at focusing, and being able to see reasonably in low-light. Each eye has a full-on blind spot, and the ...


1

You can see the number better when you move the image or your eyes, because with this action you reduce the overall contrast of the image. The "image" in brain is a composition of many images which are acquired in small time periods, and the result can be approximately described as an average of many still images. So they are kind of blurred together. When ...


1

My problem with explaining the illusion in terms of complementary colours using the opponent process theory is that the two alternating colours, red and blue, in the illusion aren't actually complementary, at least not according to the colour chart in Keegan's answer where red complements green and blue complements yellow. The theory might well account for ...


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