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The diagram is a somewhat simplistic representation of brain functions, but it is accurate. The diagram given shows the primary areas that complete the actions listed. However, the entire brain is connected and communicates with itself extensively, so it isn't like the occipital lobe is the only brain region active when you see something. For example, when ...


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Too much dopamine release in the striatum may lead to psychosis, and especially to the positive symptoms associated with this disease (e.g., delusions and hallucinations, as opposed to the negative symptoms such as a flattened affect) (Laruelle et al., 1999). The etiology of psychosis is complex. Many direct and indirect environmental factors are ...


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I believe I can see where the confusion lies when comparing the interesting artwork with psychodynamic theory. The artwork you linked uses Neurological data to form images, whereas you may be getting confused with the famous Rorschach test otherwise known as the Inkblot test, and how the inkblot images are interpreted by the viewer. Many psychologists in ...


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As far as I know, this effect cannot be eliminated by any practical means, other than stratifying the subjects into groups according to type of drug, dosage, duration of use etc. and use statistical testing to look for any differences between the groups with, e.g., linear mixed modeling. However, a cursory search on Google Scholar yields multiple studies ...


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There are some subtleties to this question which you may or may not realize. There are (at least) two similarly sounding questions, but they are actually quite different questions: Does an individual's general cognitive abilities change throughout life? Does the rank-order of a population's cognitive abilities change throughout life? In other words, if we ...


3

According to the United States Armed Forces, it is possible. They do something similar to what you propose with the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. However, according to the section "Test Validity" of the linked Wikipedia article, there is some debate about whether it only measures literacy or IQ.


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First, it is important to disambiguate between concurrent multitasking and sequential multitasking (Salvucci et al, 2009). In a recent publication I present a short overview on related work of both (Jeuris and Bardram, 2016): During concurrent multitasking cognitive resources have to be divided across several competing parallel tasks, such as driving ...


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A meta-analysis of 397 neuroimaging studies was just published looking at this very question (see here). They tested three hypotheses: Bipolarity - negative and positive are on the same continuum Bivalence - negative and positive are independent Affective workspace - valence is supported by a "flexible set of valence-general regions". Their analyses are ...


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Research suggests that endurance is improved when movements are synchronized with a musical beat. [1] This research also supports the idea that music has 'motivational' qualities that may enhance performance. One study measured the pace and attitudes of participants running on a treadmill. The control conditions included: 1) no music ('acoustic stimuli'), 2) ...


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Some research which may help is as follows: Fingelkurts, A. A., Fingelkurts, A. A., Rytsälä, H., Suominen, K., Isometsä, E., & Kähkönen, S. (2007). Impaired functional connectivity at EEG alpha and theta frequency bands in major depression. Human brain mapping, 28(3), 247-261. DOI: 10.1002/hbm.20275 Peniston, E. G., & Kulkosky, P. J. (1991). ...


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A very common test of working memory is the N-back. In the N-back, the subject needs to remember what happened some number (N) of steps earlier. For example, imagine seeing the following numbers one at a time on a computer screen. Your task is to press a key whenever the number on the screen is the same as the number that was there 3 steps earlier: 1 4 5 2 ...


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The general is that neuroeducation or educational neuroscience holds great promise for the future, but is in a very early stage of development. There is great interest in the topic, which is evident in scientific journal, textbooks, and science centres dedicated to the topic that have recently been created. These are good sources of reference as well. ...


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Eff basically has a good answer, but more recent studies, such as one published in Nature 2011 have some additional data with respect to the observed variation over time not being just random measurement error but partially explainable through changes in the volume of some brain areas: In the absence of neurological insult or degenerative conditions, IQ is ...


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triptans could help boost the efficacy of SSRIs There is minimal evidence for this Chris. One of the reasons for that is that there is a limit to how much serotonin is released for the nerve cell. So more of the same isn't going to make much difference. edit: So in terms of reuptake inhibitors, triptans are agonists. So increased agonism seems unlikely to ...


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The effects of multitasking are apparent even for the most trivial tasks. For example try walking and eating a sandwich at the same time, you will walk slower and more irregular. The multitasking effects though, are much less when the competing tasks are simple or familiar. Exctract from this article : In experiments published in 2001, Joshua Rubinstein, ...


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Short answer In case of dopamine, its amounts present in the reward pathway in the brain correlates positively with the intensity of pleasure experienced. Background To focus the answer I'll narrow the scope of this post to one of the most extensively investigated emotional centers in the brain, namely the reward center involving the dopaminergic mesolimbic ...


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