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Based on a review by Kolb et al, 2012, it seems that "the brain is finished developing by 25" refers to the point when synaptic pruning in the cerebral cortex levels off, on average. However, the prefrontal cortex, the region most unique to humans and involved in executive function, develops in this way well into the third decade of life. The above review ...


4

For a broad meaning of "similarly", the answer is yes, the processing of sign language has substantial similarities with that of spoken language, in terms of brain areas involved. There are also some differences; the latter issue is a vast and still somewhat controversial research area; from the conclusion of a 2007 review: Where differences can be shown ...


2

The Nighres project has released some 7T MRI datasets and tools to run them. You can read the paper on the tools here, and download the datasets from NITRC here.


2

The primary visual cortex is topographic, which means that specific parts of that brain region correspond exactly to specific parts of your visual field. In order to prove that a scotoma (literally a blind spot in your vision) is due to dysfunctional neurons, all you need to do is show that the neurons responsible for that spot in your vision are not working ...


2

It looks like fslroi is the tool I'm looking for. To temporally truncate a scan the usage would be fslroi <input> <output> <tmin> <tsize> where <tmin> would be zero and <tsize> would be the number of volumes you want to keep. Now I just need to figure out how many volumes make up 7 minutes...


2

Assuming your mask is in NIfTI format (nii or nii.gz extension), you can use the fslstats command line tool for that. Just type fslstats on the command line to see the help text for command syntax and arguments. For your specific case, you can use: fslstats <input> -V where <input> is the path to your mask NIfTI file. The returned numbers will ...


1

I'm not personally familiar with this project (outside my area of research), but a quick search brought me to the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE): http://fcon_1000.projects.nitrc.org/indi/abide/ Based on citation counts for the primary articles, it seems popular. If you want to compare to other types of brains you will probably need to use ...


1

The biology underlying the BOLD response is much slower than typical TRs, so I would say on one hand it doesn't really matter because the TR interval is not the time scale that matters. On the other hand, if you are presenting stimuli of duration where the TR matters, those stimuli are occurring too quickly to be resolved separately using fMRI. You may be ...


1

This is not a circular question. In fact, using fMRI to create targets is useful to determine TMS targets outside of the motor cortex or visual cortex. See the study here that used fMRI during a task to generate TMS targets, and then applied theta burst stimulation to those targets: https://www.pnas.org/content/113/21/6059 BOLD contrasts are very useful ...


1

[This is an older post, but...] A brain atlas is going to, typically, be a set of images or volume that is labeled anatomically or functionally. Typically one would take a single volume of data and register or align it to the atlas (or vice-versa). Parcellation is a way of segmenting sub-regions of a particular region of the brain. (What a "region" is or "...


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