52

This question would require an experiment that cannot ethically be conducted, but it is interesting. Wikipedia has an article on historical attempts at language deprivation experiments: An experiment allegedly carried out by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century saw young infants raised without human interaction in an attempt to ...


9

Monozygotic twin studies are the general course of action for this kind of question. Genetic and environmental influences on multiple dimensions of religiosity: a twin study concludes there is a genetic component. A complete approach for these kind of studies is to take twins that have been separated to different households from birth and compare them to ...


8

Heritability estimates of Extraversion (and other Big 5 factors) The introduction section of Loehlin et al (1998) provides a narrative review of heritability estimates of big 5 personality traits (i.e., one of which is extraversion). A brief extract gives a flavour of some of the research that has been conducted: A recent heritability analysis of the ...


7

To learn about other twins reared apart, investigate the earlier Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart and the ongoing Minnesota Twin Family Study. To pique your curiosity: Jim Lewis and Jim Springer stand out in the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart because some of their two histories were strikingly identical; several notable examples: 1st wife: "...


7

The Dark Triad traits you speak of are subclinical personality traits, therefore they cannot be diagnosed. Everyone carries some of the characteristics of these traits. People high on these traits are also not considered to be defective, even better they may in some environments be considered to be an advantage (e.g., business areas). You may want to read ...


6

psychological sequelae might be a word you're looking for if you forgive that it's somehow still neurobiological; it is however, not genetic or developmental or something somebody was born with: Chronic kidney disease, for example, is sometimes a sequela of diabetes, and neck pain is a common sequela of whiplash or other trauma to the cervical vertebrae. ...


6

As I alluded in the comments, I think your question is underpinned by a more fundamental worry of the "best level of description" for psychological phenomena. If you a reductionist then you believe that all of psychology is best explained in terms of the activity of neurons (or systems of neurons if you are of the system perspective; note that some do not ...


6

While no cases of complete isolation of a group of children seem to exist, idioglossia (language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people) in twins is well documented and appears to be amplified by social isolation, as the sad cases of June and Jennifer Gibbons aka "Silent Twins" and the "San Diego twins" Poto and Cabengo illustrate. The ...


5

Although this paper is not grounded in neurobiology "Up speeds you down. Awe-evoking monumental buildings trigger behavioral and perceived freezing" by Joey et al. should be a good starting point for further research into the domain of environmental psychology with a focus on human-made environments. In the paper, subjects are shown to have slower reaction ...


5

Biondi et al. (1998) compared MR images of monozygotic twins and found that while the brains of monozygotic twins are not identical, they are similar. Relevant for understanding the concordance rate of schizophrenia in monozygotic twins, Suddath et al. (1990) examined MR images of monozygotic twins who where discordant for schizophrenia. They found that the ...


5

Short answer: Representations are a noteworthy controversy in embodied or situated psychological theories. Can we explain behavior without reference to representations? Long answer: Most modern theories presume that information is represented somewhere, such as the brain, and that behavior is organized because that somewhere is organized. Anti-...


4

Just to help, here's an illustration of the sort of answer I'm looking for, though personally I'd be happy with any suggestions, even if less detailed than the first below. Long answer: On one hand, Pinker and Bloom (1990) argue that our language faculty is similar to our physical organs, in that they evolved as adaptations to evolutionary pressures. On the ...


4

The beginnings of theories based on attachment regarding long and short term interpersonal relationships is Attachment Theory which was started by John Bowlby. Attachment Theory is primarily applied to studies in relationships concerning children, even though it was expanded in the 80's to include adults. In attachment theory, as highlighted in the link ...


3

According to the United States Armed Forces, it is possible. They do something similar to what you propose with the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. However, according to the section "Test Validity" of the linked Wikipedia article, there is some debate about whether it only measures literacy or IQ.


3

I managed to find some newspaper articles and research that touch this topic, claiming that indeed more traditional architecture has positive influences on health and well-being, although these statements would likely require a more careful evaluation for the sake of rigor. Sources: Beautiful urban architecture boosts health as much as green spaces ...


2

This is my own conjecture: I would think a Nature/neurobiological/genetic disorder would be classified as some sort of "Structural Disorder." Maybe the Nurture side would be something like "Processing Disorder"? (this is assuming we're talking maladaptive effects) Is our science even to a point where we can differentiate between a neurobiological ...


2

The Wikipedia article seems to provide a summary of this information with links to the primary literature http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causes_of_schizophrenia#Genetics Concordance rates between monozygotic twins vary in different studies, approximately 50%; whereas dizygotic twins was 17%. Some twin studies (Koskenvuo et al; Hoeffer et al) have found ...


2

Actually, you are misunderstanding twin studies when it comes to shared vs. non-shared environments. These are defined only in terms of outcomes: The environmental influences on personality are divided into two main types in the behavior genetic literature: “shared” versus “nonshared” environment. In typical behavior genetic studies, actual measures ...


2

In addition to MariaAnt's good contribution, let me take another angle. You wrote: Studies comparing identical and fraternal twins, or occasionally identical twins reared apart have mostly concluded that there is a pretty high heritability of IQ. These studies, in particular the identical twins reared apart studies, imply that someone with the same genes ...


1

The positive impact of natural scenery on individuals well being has been well studied. I found a few studies looking at the physiological effects of viewing natural scenes. Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to access the electrical activity of the localized brain cortex associated with natural and urban environments (Ulrich, 1981; Nakamura, 1992). ...


1

This is a very broad question, as indicated in the comments. There are many debates which theorists – and people in general – often disagree on. (Miller, 2010; Sigelman & Rider, 2012): Goodness vs Badness of Human Nature Humans are innately good, bad or neither Nature vs Nurture Genes, biology, and maturation vs experiences, learning and social ...


1

Thing is, when we look at something for a while, it influences us to, in some ways, follow it. If I am not mistaken, a similar principle works for yawning and how a person can yawn just by looking at someone else who does. I wish to elucidate with a personal experience. In my high school, there was this girl with amazing handwriting. I got down with the pox ...


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