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11

Here is a study that creates and manipulates the "song stuck in your head" phenomenon. In particular, it is a myth that only "bad" songs are stuck in your head. These songs can be categorized as intrusive thoughts. Also the obvious finding was that recently heard music was more likely to be stuck in your head. The authors comes up with a term called the "...


10

A great overview of this topic is available in Chapter 6 of the book The Invisible Gorilla by Chabris & Simons. My answer is based, in large part, on their summary of the topic. The "Mozart Effect" was originally reported by Rauscher, Shaw, & Ky (1993). In the experiment, college students completed a set of typical IQ tests. Before taking the tests, ...


9

One of the claims that is somewhat easy to validate empirically is that "432 Hz sounds better than 440 Hz." This informal experiment tests this in a straightforward way. People listen to pitch-shifted versions of songs at a variety of different frequencies and rate their preference for the song. Importantly, they don't know which frequency the song has been ...


8

Short Answer: People tap their feet due to increased activity in the cerebellum. Detailed Answer: There already is some evidence that music can release certain neurotransmitters, including dopamine. You can assume that people who tap their feet to the music, are in someway "pleased" by the music, meaning that their body goes into some sort of ...


7

As mentioned in a recent study by Thompson et al. (2012), there are two perspectives which account for the effects of background music on reading comprehension specifically (but as I argue later, these seem generalizable): the Cognitive-Capacity hypothesis and the Arousal-Mood hypothesis. In short, the potential cost of background music listening for ...


7

According to the article "Addiction to Music Has Biochemical Basis" on Softpedia News by Tudor Vieru, which reports on findings by Robert Zatorre and Valorie Salimpoor (Salimpoor & Zatorre, 2013), who both hold appointments as neuroscientists at the McGill University: "listening to music you like also triggers the release of dopamine, a ...


6

Short answer The recent literature shows mounting evidence for beneficial effects of music on cognitive abilities. The big 'but' in the issue is how specific those effects are and whether they will hold up in longitudinal studies. Background Great question. Your citations provided reach back to 2006 so I thought to limit this answer using recent articles ...


5

Music is known as a form of an abstract stimulus, which can arouse feelings of euphoria, similar to tangible rewards that involve the striatal (corpus striatum) dopamine system. In a study, published in nature neuroscience, researchers used the neurochemical specificity of 11C Raclopride positron emission tomography scanning, combined with ...


5

There is a clear association between musical ability and mathematical ability, perhaps best recognised in savantism in people with developmental disabilities. There are limited domains in which savantism appears to occur, including mathematical calculations, reproducing music instantly, recalling specific facts, and perfect-perspective drawing. There are a ...


5

Wearing those big headphone is indirectly a way to isolate yourself from the surrounding sound. That is usually a prelude for relaxation, or meditation. (In people with audiotory disorder, or with authism, this is a way they can feel good as that remove a big source of stimulis) On the other side for the heavy metal, study have found it can be a stress ...


5

The short answer is that it is pleasurable. Recent research from Witek et al (2014) sheds light on this. Their research on affective response and desire to move when listening to funk drum breaks showed that "syncopation seems to be an important structural factor in embodied and affective responses to groove". Here is their full PLOS article: http://...


5

The phenomenom you describe is called Mere-exposure effect : The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon by which people tend to develop a preference for things merely because they are familiar with them. In social psychology, this effect is sometimes called the familiarity principle. The effect has been demonstrated with many kinds of things, ...


5

Humans technically don't perceive frequencies, they perceive pitch. According to Wikipedia: the idiom relating vertical height to sound pitch is shared by most languages. citing a 1930 article by Pratt, which in turn says that: Stumpf has found that adjectives meaning high and low (or words closely related in meaning) have been applied to tones in ...


4

I wouldn't call it a disorder, unless it significantly affects your life. Not enjoying music or not being able to produce music is known as "amusia". It probably has to do with differences in perceiving pitch [1]. It can also occur in people with recently fitted hearing aids or cochlear implants [2]. If you are interested in this, there is a chapter about ...


4

I would read this paper, its mighty interesting. Books Snyder, B.(2000) Music and memory: An introduction. The MIT Press. Cambridge 291. Hemispheric Coordination and Conflict "...while listening to the melody of the popular carol "Silent Night", the right hemisphere thinks, "Ah, yes, Silent Night", while the left hemisphere thinks, "two sequences: ...


4

Roughly speaking, most forms of learning become harder as one ages. Probably the most relevant aspect for your question is learning fine motor skills: most studies revealed that performance gains in fine motor tasks are diminished in older adults


4

As your luck would have it, there is a study by Schwartz et al. (2003) that examines just that. They found that there was a specific personality type associated with music preference in adolescents. The paper is freely available on familywise.ca. Schwartz, K. D., & Fouts, G. T. (2003). Music preferences, personality style, and developmental issues of ...


3

That's a difficult to say I assume many kind of past memories* linked with emotions subconsciously play certainly a critical role nevertheless I found an interesting link (http://www.gizmag.com/predicting-hit-songs/20939/) which is about a formula on how to find out the next hit song. *by memories I mean more kind of episodic memories rather than semantic ...


3

This may be happening due to beat entrainment. Different music genres have different beat and rhythm patterns. The ones that are calming will generally have a lower beat and rhythm frequencies. The lower beat and rhythm frequencies are similar to the frequency of heartbeat and breathing when a person is feeling calm and/or relaxed. Through the process of ...


3

Research suggests that endurance is improved when movements are synchronized with a musical beat. [1] This research also supports the idea that music has 'motivational' qualities that may enhance performance. One study measured the pace and attitudes of participants running on a treadmill. The control conditions included: 1) no music ('acoustic stimuli'), 2) ...


3

The following answer is based on my own experience learning music combined with general principles of cognitive psychology related to skill acquisition. I think that learning music would help a person recall a melody, a beat, and music in general. Formal training would be particularly helpful, but informal training would also often have a similar result. ...


3

I found one 2017 meta-analysis by Sala and Gobet which is probably superior methodologically to the few non-systematic reviews found by AliceD. I say "probably" because the meta-analysis includes quite a few not-directly-IQ transfers, e.g. to math. Nevertheless, they do describe IQ transfers separately... and overall Cohen's d they found for that is ...


3

Oliver Sacks has an excellent and very approachable book on the topic (psychology/cognition + music in particular, less art in general): Musicophilia.


3

Looking into the term earworms lead me to the following answer. If you search earworms into Google Scholar, at the top of the list is 3 papers, after which the rest seem to be about corn earworms. The papers are Beaman & Williams (2010) followed by Halpern & Bartlett (2011) which is then followed by Williamson, et al. (2012). It was the last paper ...


2

Following the comments you've received, I'll add my own subjective answer in the affirmative to your first question. I think we've already compiled enough votes and comments here that support @JoshGitlin's unscientific answer to say that there is some empirical basis for theorizing the existence of a "taste" acquisition process in music. ...


2

One relevant piece of research is the research on the “mere exposure” effect. Basically, the idea is that being exposed to something novel is enough to make you like it a little bit more. The most common interpretation is that we generally like the things we can understand/process easily and that repeated exposures makes the stimulus more familiar and thus ...


2

It could be the case that it takes time to like some thinks. We get habituated by being exposed to the same stimuli, here music. The dislike decreases after repeated presentations and the likeness may occur, if at all. At the same time, there is a continuous 'strive' between 'familiarity' and 'change'. The experience of 'change' we face by listening to some ...


2

In a comprehensive review that included 140+ primary research papers, Juslin & Laukka (2003) explain that there is a close relationship between vocal expression of emotions and the musical expression of emotions. Indeed, music and speech have similar characteristics and therefore can illicit similar emotions (table 1). Table 1. Commonalities of speech ...


2

It's highly plausible (judging from your description) that you induce some sort of hypnotized state. I highly doubt it's strongly related to heavy metal though. The state of mind you're hinting at is not really a state between the subconscious and conscious. It's your mind deceiving your body that you're asleep without losing awareness. The increased visual ...


2

Tempo should be an objective parameter in music. The same piece is heard differently at higher tempo than in lower tempo. This is sensible if you accept an Aristotelian perspective of music, whereby music is an attempt to represent something real (could be a person's emotions or natural sounds). The key in your question seems to be "not experienced enough". ...


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