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31

As far as I know, there is no accepted science to dream interpretation. In fact, there's no science to it at all. Evidence has shown that indeed, dreaming draws material from people, places, and things in our lives, but there's absolutely no scientific data out there (that I'm familiar with) that links dreams to anything meaningful in our actual daily lives. ...


19

From what I remember, the MBTI has been compared in some studies to the Big Five (or OCEAN) model of personality. If you've not heard of it, the Big Five is the primary theory of personality that is accepted by researchers who do this sort of thing. Here are some papers comparing the two approaches: Recent comparison and another. The main point is that a ...


14

As far as I know, dreams are meaningless information, strung into a story or series of events and interpretation are therefore highly subjective. The theory that I know best is that dreams are a result of memory consolidation during sleep. Of course, this is still controversial. Memory consolidation is explained (simple version) as follows: during ...


10

As you mentioned in your question, Jung was less than perfectly consistent in his definition of archetype throughout his career. This ambiguity reflects the continuing debate about semantic representation in the brain. His early work stressed the emergence of archetypes as fundamental dichotomies of self experience- whose Enantiodromaic character was the ...


8

The MBTI is based on Carl Jung's work with psychological types. However, Jung's work led to the formation of analytic psychology. This work is often associated with clinical observations and anecdotes instead of controlled scientific study. This means that Jung didn't carry out research that can be considered conclusive and scientifically validated. However, ...


6

It appears that there is little scientific backing for Jung's theories. As these theories were first suggested at the start of the 20th century they have had a considerable amount of time to receive scientific support. If they were accepted by scientists it therefore seems like they would have been widely used and cited by scholars in the interim period. ...


6

We could have scientific clinical study of the reports of dreams. Given that the dreams don't relate to specific real world events and often have very bizarre properties there's no reason to believe the report has much to do with what really happened. Therefore, from a clinicians standpoint they're useful in that you're in a relaxed state when they occur ...


6

Has dom-ter loops theory been expressed formally in any kind of Jungian function theory study? Based on a reasonably diverse search of Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus, I am concluding that dominant-tertiary loop theory seems to be an original proposal by the author of the forum post cited by the question author. It appears to be a theory which has ...


4

I would first like to point out that according to some, Jungian psychology is considered pseudoscientific and therefore off-topic here. However, as a lot of psychology cannot be measurable currently within the conventional field of science, and as Jungian psychology is still followed by many therapists, it is considered by others to be on-topic. This seems ...


4

I was influenced by this lecture. I will jump ahead to the pertinent part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ei6wFJ9kCc&t=59m20s My interpretation is that there are two general areas in the brain responsible for memory formation: 1) hippocampus and 2) basal ganglia. According to the speaker, a study shows a direct correlation between the amount of ...


4

There are not 16 Jungian types. There are 16 MBTI combinations and 16 Kersian (sub-)temperament types. All are related and easily confused. Jung, in Psychological Types (Collected Works, Book 6), defines two Attitude Types and four functions, splitting the latter into two groups of two. Attitude Type is Extraversion and Introversion and takes up 9 of the ...


3

It's because order doesn't matter with the types: ENTJ == ENJT When you remove the permutations of order, there are only 16 possibilities. Another way to think about it is that there are 4 traits, and each trait can take one of two values, so there should be 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 possibilities, which is 16.


3

Do the Big Five traits interact? I have given a general overview of the Big Five model in a previous answer. The Big Five model of personality is based on a statistical analysis of a person's tendency to agree or disagree with short descriptive statements. The principal object of this analysis is to identify independent factors that can explain variation in ...


3

The research done by Dardio Nardi (the researcher you're referring to) clearly shows that something is there. Although, he would have no way of knowing as to whether his samples were of the particular type, or if what's being demonstrated really demonstrates use of that particular cognitive function. E.g doing something logical doesn't necessarily mean you'...


3

Absolutely not. And, unlike claimed in other answers, it's about as based on Carl Jung as me whistling out of tune would be "work based on Mozart." The MBTI was "developed" by a "psychic medium" who read books on Jung and spoke to him twice, much to his chagrin. He later actively avoided her. Furthermore, Jung himself cautioned against using his ...


3

Perhaps a more useful way of looking at these concepts is to consider anima in terms of the hindbrain, which takes sensory inputs from both the body and external stimuli and creates a virtual model strongly colored by memories ( with associated feelings) and our conditioning. This model is then "presented" to the forebrain as images + feelings. Animus could ...


2

From the way I understand it, everyone, male or female has both masculine and feminine personalities and it is up to the subjects whether they recognise that or not and to what level. The idea is that in order to become all you can be you need to integrate yourself with your inner opposite sex. The animus within the woman and the anima within the man are ...


2

Jung outlines this pretty clearly in both Aion and Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious. I strongly recommend those books to anyone attempting to gain a deeper understanding of these concepts in particular. I found the first few chapters of Aion to be particularly enlightening. There are many anthropomorphic symbols representing archetypes in the human ...


2

This is a more speculative than I usually post here, but here it goes: Based on his works, I'd describe Jung more as a philosopher of mind than an actual psychologist in the modern meaning of the word (although perhaps that observation applies more widely to some of Jung's contemporary colleagues) in that he very seldom formulated simple and directly ...


2

Reviewing Jung’s nature of objects the object for which the introvert becomes alienated is the item, topic, or nature that is causing a subjective reaction. This in keeping with the struggle of maintaining a proper distinction between the self and ego creates a confusion toward which is “steering the ship” so to speak. That is to say which is the ...


2

Synchronicity is an interesting philosophical idea; unfortunately there is no evidence that it actually exists. Therefore, there are some people who consider Jung's theory to be pseudoscientific. Robert Todd Carroll, in his book "The Skeptics Dictionary," notes that "even if there were a synchronicity between the mind and the world such that certain ...


2

All personality models are related in that they are carving up the same variance into different factors, and some of the factors will overlap. Extraversion is probably the most similar trait between the two models, but it's still quite different. As a personality psychologist, I would say yes, this is potentially an overestimation of their convergence. A ...


1

All this verbage, without a single answer. The archetypes are the forms with which we populate our psyches. They are only outlines. The context is filled in individually, and therefore differs individually. To use your example of "father." We can all agree upon the existence of "fatherness," the condition of being a father. Thus, the archetype "Father" ...


1

Short answer The ego, the collective unconscious and the persona collectively help the person to self-actualise and reach individuation through the elements of the psyche being in harmony with each other. Long answer A lot of what I am providing in this answer has been put together using my knowledge of Jungian Psychology from my 3 year Psychotherapy ...


1

I think that Jung probably felt that the Animus it the base of every man's psyche and that the Anima the base of every woman's psyche. You can have differences regarding how much of the other sex's psyche you have in you, but it's not necessary to speak about an Anima for women when it's just a "woman's psyche" and vice versa for men.


1

If you look more into the history of the creators of the Myer's Briggs, you will notice that it is loosely based off Jungian archetypes. It was not created with 16 types initially. Actually, the Jungian theory is only in a few scales (I-E, S-N, T-F), and one of the criticisms of this test is that the theoretical basis really was not preserved. The ...


1

Does the MBTI have a fundamental background? Yes. It is based on Jung's work, later published as Psychological Types (Collected Works, Book 6). Katherine Briggs, Isabel Myer's mother, did the initial work via communication with Jung. Like Jung, she had different theories at first, but dropped them when she heard of Jung's research on the subject. She ...


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