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I also think it's false that Skinner really said it (exactly like that), and even if he said it offhand verbally, it's almost certain he didn't put it in writing in that form. My argument is that the 4-gram "shape him into anything" doesn't show in n-gram viewer, which means there are very few books containing it... according to the help. If you try "give ...


7

Broca is generally considered the first person to localise structure to function, however, there are some earlier individuals to consider: EDIT: i recommend the chapter Neurolinguistics from the Middle Ages to the Pre-Modern Era: Historical Vignettes in: Stemmer, B. & Whittaker, H.A. (1998). Handbook of Neurolinguistics. Academic Press: London. it has ...


6

Phineas Gage had his famous spike through the head in 1848, which lead to some discoveries about the function of that area, but these were quite general. See: Harlow, J. M. (1869). Recovery from the passage of an iron bar through the head. Clapp. But, Broca appears to be the first to identify a specific area: In 1861, the French surgeon, Pierre Paul ...


5

The American Psychological Association requires graduate programs to cover a range of core competencies, including "the breadth of scientific psychology, it's history and development, it's research methods, and its applications. To achieve this end, the students shall be exposed to the current body of knowledge in at least the following areas:...history and ...


4

for the record, and as confirmation of what the above answers affirm regarding ancient times here is the abstract from a fairly recent historical review of the subject: Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus ...


3

At this present moment I cannot find full date information, but looking at a copy of the DSM-III I have found, on the bottom of the 3rd page of the PDF it points out: First Printing, February 1980 Second Printing, May 1980


3

The 1958 Humanist says: Skinner's view, as Israel presents it, is that human beings can be molded — and happily molded — into anything This article also refers to an epic debate between Skinner and Carl Rogers at a 1956 American Psychological Association meeting.


3

This paper suggests it was a psychophysics experiment by Fencher in 1860.


3

Glen McGhee's "A Cultural History of Cognitive Dissonance," (2005/2014) notes that Gustav Ichheiser (1897-1969) dealt with personal dissonance and dissonance reduction in 1928 (212 Note 2). Also Kurt Lewin's tension theory, and Festinger's level of aspiration work in 1940. Lorne L. Dawson also has an interesting chapter, "Clearing the Underbrush: Moving ...


3

I'm still not clear on what is your question. You ask whether psychology and medicine differ in some aspect of their methodological approach. Experiments are typically analysed using statistics to test hypotheses. So those things all go together. Psychology and medicine both perform controlled experiments and observational studies. They both perform ...


3

You may want to have a look at our 40 questions to date that use the statistics tag. These may demonstrate the complexity of our applications in statistics. Wikipedia also has an entire psychological statistics page that seems intended to index other pages on specific applications. Psychological experiments commonly test null hypotheses (e.g., $H_0$: the ...


3

as others have mentioned, Colin Cherry's cocktail party problem highlighted a crucial bottleneck in information flow at the highest levels of sensory-motor neural integration. by giving this phenomenon a sexy title Cherry showed an intuitive gift for public relations! however the ground for his thinking was prepared by prior theoretical developments - from ...


2

The university of Oslo teaches a rather big part of the history of psychological research. I've completed it myself, so I know for sure. Do note that the subject also involves a lot more than just history. https://www.uio.no/studier/emner/sv/psykologi/PSYC1200/


2

ad 1. Difficult to answer, but I found an article from as early as 1825 that links the rotating spokes illusion to the retina (Roget, 1825). ad 2. Interesting question, but more a question of semantics I think. Personally, I think optical illusion is fine, as used by a master of illusions Michael Bach. Admittedly, he is German, so if this is linguistically ...


2

Out of the basically four possible ways to change behaviors, your rubber band lies at one extreme, being an example of positive punishment, which works by presenting an aversive stimulus after an undesired behavior is exhibited, making the behavior less likely to happen in the future. There is also the lesser negative punishment when a certain reinforcing ...


2

Let me open this by saying that it's not clear to me that Guilford coined the term, as the Google n-gram viewer shows use well before 1950: Freud wrote an essay on creative writers (and day-dreaming) in 1908 but he does not talk of creativity as a noun/concept in itself at least in the English translation. Likewise Jung wrote a fair bit about the "creative ...


2

Skinner never said anything like this. Unfortunately his work towards a science of behavior is often misunderstood. See Mike Samsa’s blog post Misunderstanding Behaviorism for a good explanation of Skinner’s philosophy.


1

Short answer Based on the general developments in drug and medical device development research, 1970 was a major milestone, as randomized controlled trials were marked as compulsory for new drugs to be marketed through the FDA regulations. Background The question is quite broad, but in terms of clinical trials I can say that since 1970 the FDA required ...


1

As far as I can tell, the common theme is that "vibration" is involved in both of them. But that's where the similarities seem to stop. Hartley formulated specific hypotheses such as Pleasure is the result of moderate vibrations, pain of vibrations so violent as to break the continuity of the nerves. which we now know it's not exactly how these ...


1

It would have been pretty strange for there to be multi-year gaps in Skinner's publication record, and in fact, Skinner continued to publish every year in both of those periods and beyond (Epstein, 1977). I've provided a link to a list of his publications which includes both periods, but there is no real way to say which of these publications were the 'key' ...


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