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Assuming there's not a neurological dysfunction underlying sleep deprivation (which is even more possible with Aspergers as sleep dysfunction is a typical comorbidity) it can simply be a learned behavior. The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit. Procedural memory is always at ...


6

I will split this answer into two parts - first, about sensory immersion as it is defined and scientifically examined. Second, I will try to address specifically what you asked for regarding the effects of sensory overstimulation and overload. Sensory immersion I don't think your definition of sensory immersion is right when you said it's a "deliberate ...


5

From a quick search online I see no reason why you distantiate what you describe from auditory hallucinations: a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus. Given the article you link to, which arguably does address your question (yes, some people report experiencing this), you mainly seem to be concerned that this ...


4

No – at least, they shouldn't be required. Wikipedia describes the DSM-5 as requiring "delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech". Delusions are distinct from hallucinations in that they aren't necessarily perceptual in a conventional sense, though both diverge a person's conscious experience from empirical reality. Disorganized speech is ...


4

Karl Jaspers describes clinical reports in which patients hallucinatory perception was changed in accordance with the optical distortion. For example, a prism would double the images of devils, binoculars enlarge or decrease the image, colored glasses make it colored, etc. He refers "Seppilli, Contributo allo studio delie allucinazioni unilaterali. Riv. sper....


4

Unfortunately hallucinations of visual type seldom occur with schizophrenia. When visual hallucinations occur in schizophrenia or more frequently (but still uncommon) in other disorders they are rather unlike a simulation of the current world - e.g. a closed door becoming open in the room. In addition patient in a hallucinatory state is very affectively ...


4

Can drugs cause a psychosis or only unlock it Drugs can cause acute psychosis, but are not associated with a precipitation of a chronic psychotic state. Animal studies have shown that various drugs (including LSD, ketamine and amphetamine) can induce acute psychosis in genetically non-disposed animals (Ham et al., 2017). However, in general, drugs do not ...


3

A quick Google search reveals some answers such as Atkinson, J. R. (2006). Around half of all deaf people diagnosed with schizophrenia report experiencing “voices,” during which they sense someone communicating with them in the absence of any external stimulus. This closely parallels prevalence rates of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in hearing people ...


3

The short answer to your question Can a person with delusions completely acknowledge their delusions is yes. But it depends. There are quite a few psychological disorders that have symptoms of delusion or hallucination. Bentall et al. (2009) took a look at the structure of paranoid delusions. They concluded that emotion related and cognitive processes ...


3

A hallucination is a perception in the absence of external stimulus that has qualities of real perception and hallucinations can occur in different ways. Visual hallucinations can occur with the eyes open or closed (see also). Visual hallucinations can also occur with people who have lost their sight Just like visual hallucinations, auditory ...


3

Have a look at The God drug DMT. It causes people to see/talk to God and can be taken as an actual drug, but I believe it is also produced in the body during near death experiences. I am no expert in it but here's wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/N,N-Dimethyltryptamine


3

Short answer Based on a dated and small study, early-blind individuals do not experience drug-induced hallucinations, while the late-blind can, but not necessarily do so. Background Krill et al. (1963) investigated the effects of LSD on totally blind people (i.e., no residual vision) and they report visual hallucinations in 13 out of 24 subjects. This ...


3

As there is no sensory input from reality which could cause these sensations, are they technically proprioceptive hallucinations? Not really, although I think it wouldn't be completely inaccurate to think of them that way. A hallucination has no basis in reality (e.g. auditory hallucinations); what you're describing has a physical basis in reality. It is ...


3

Some of the experiences you are describing (e.g., psychedelic states, daydreaming and sleep) are examples of Altered States of Consciousness. These states may share common features but it is probably not useful to try and reduce them to all being instances of the same phenomenon. Charles Tart wrote extensively on this topic in the 1960s and 1970s and his ...


3

In some form yes if patient is mesmerized by visual heartbeats, acording to Sciencedaily. Also is connected to someones beliefs. But in my opinion could also be induced by drugs in mices. So, out of body experience could be umbrella term for more than one phenomenon. Some of them could be caused by hypnotics, some not. I'm not sure if those experiments ...


3

While acknowledging the fact that Google delivers personalized results, I am fairly sure a Google search for "heautoscopy" will deliver you bucket loads of papers to read - I have copied a random handful for your convenience below under 'further reading'. However, a popular source seems to contradict your definition, as it states heautoscopy as ...


2

According to the DSM V, for the diagnosis of schizophrenia, the following is necessary: two (or more) of the following, each present for a significant portion of time during a 1-month period (or less if successfully treated): (1) Delusions (2) Hallucinations (3) Disorganized speech (4) Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior (5) Negative ...


2

I'm not sure about any reliable research on hallucinations in blind people per se. However, there is a large body of literature on visual imagery in congenitally blind groups. This is assuming that hallucinations are based on typical representations, but are usually held in check through inhibition. Research conducted by Pring et al. found that ...


2

Short answer Visual hallucinations in psychotic disorders like schizophrenia are typically not simple transformations of an inanimate lifeless object into another state. They are not a car turning upside down, or a door suddenly opening. Instead, they are often 'de novo' images or scenes, with religious and frightening content and just beyond grasp. ...


1

Q: Are normal external stimuli still processed by the brain during a hallucination? A: Yes, normal stimuli are still processed during a hallucination, but some of them may be distorted or obliterated. This is evident clinically. For example, When a schizophrenia patient has an auditory hallucination (such as voices talking to him/her) [Ref 1] while he/she ...


1

I did not find a study trying to test your idea. I suppose your hypothesis could be tested by comparing the results Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire (VISQ) on the expanded/condensed dimension of participants with induced slower condition to a control group. McCarthy-Jones & Fernyhough (2011) studied the correlations between the dimensions and ...


1

There are certainly some anecdotal stories that hallucinations (as part of psychosis) occured in highly creative people e.g. van Gogh or in the families of some creative people, such as the story of James Joyce's daugher. But that's anecdotal evidence. I tried to find whether some (psychometric) measure of imagination correlates with hallucinations, but not ...


1

Most people (including myself) do not hear or speak with inner voices, but it is not unheard of, see Hearing Voices Network. Ego State theory is a theory of multiple personality facets (ego states). In their book "Ego States: Theory and Therapy", John G. and Helen H. Watkins transcribe several hypnosis sessions, where they communicate with different ego ...


1

"The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit" This simply is not the case. "So in this regard, it can be addictive behavior in the same way a "bad habit" can." Bad habits can not be "addictive". That is not what either word means. IN fact, sleep deprivation leads to an alteration ...


1

Short answer It is mainly aberrant activity in the higher sensory association areas that is linked to hallucinations. Background Brain imaging studies of hallucinations come in 2 flavors: “state” and “trait”. State studies are so-called symptom-capture studies, where subjects signal the start and end of a hallucination. During this window, the brain ...


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The short answer is "Yes" - there is a practice of taking conscious control of one's dreams called "Lucid Dreaming". This practice involves a number of techniques used to achieve awareness and control within a dream. One of the techniques, called Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming (WILD) involves staying still in bed for extended periods of time. After a fairly ...


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