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15

A conscious basis for gender identification? There is currently no evidence to suggest that conscious experiences are a factor in leading a transgender person to identify with the opposite sex. Additionally, there is mounting evidence that transgender children are statistically indistinguishable from children of the gender with which they identify, meaning ...


13

Funnily enough, there was a Science article published on this (see here). In their sample of university students, Mehl et al. had participants wear a specialized device that recorded audio samples from daily life (The EAR). They report that (emphasis mine): The data suggest that women spoke on average 16,215 (SD = 7301) words and men 15,669 (SD = 8633) ...


6

Short answer: It might be genetic. Human sexual behaviour, especially where stigma and taboos are involved, is notoriously difficult to study, so the real answer is that we just don't know. However, some evidence suggests that genetic factors may be at play: A 2008 study compared 112 male-to-female transsexuals ... with 258 cisgender male controls. ...


6

This is an interesting question and with the baby and his/her gender status, CNN reported that the baby was born in British Columbia, "outside the medical system," and did not undergo a genital inspection after birth, campaign group Gender Free I.D. Coalition said in a statement. Short Answer There seems to be no clinical consensus on any psychological ...


5

I don't think the idea of a male/female brain is well established in the neurosciences. If you read a book like Delusions of Gender you'll get a critical perspective on the status of sex differences in the brain. At some level, sex differences in behaviour must be mediated through the brain. But there are major debates about the degree to which such ...


5

Exactly like you, I would like to begin by saying that I have no animosity nor prejudice against anyone. What I am saying below is not meant to be offensive to anyone, it is just an honest account of what the data in my region says. You wrote: "I can only think of 2 possible solutions ... either a difference in psychological predisposition between the ...


5

Searching the first three pages of "personality gender egalitarianism" on Google Scholar, I found five studies on this topic. All of them support the view finding of increased gender differences in more egalitarian countries, and I didn't find any that were against. [Edit: added a Falk 2018 as noted in a comment.] Most of the studies analyze the Big Five ...


5

The subject of gender can be a very personal subject and the subject of gender is discussed among the LGBTQIA+ community. The LGBTQIA Allyship is the practice of confronting heterosexism, sexism, genderism, allosexism, and monosexism in oneself and others out of self-interest and a concern for the well being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer,...


5

But I'm wondering if any of these hormones are linked with physically intimate non-sexual behaviour, like hugs, kisses and cuddles. Kissing is a little messy because it could be characterised as sexual behaviour. However, oxytocin does has a far more broader role in pro-social and affiliative behaviour than just sexual activity. Here's one reference. It ...


4

I hope I am qualified to answer this question. I am not a psychologist but have worked with transgender persons in volunteering positions a number of times and am fairly well researched on the topic. The biggest key point as I have studied simply is based on health outcomes as opposed to comparing this to mental illness. This page talks about the practical ...


4

There's a Wikipedia page with a lot of related studies. Among other things we find out there that: A 2004 meta-analysis by Richard Lynn and Paul Irwing published in 2005 found that the mean IQ of men exceeded that of women by up to 5 points on the Raven's Progressive Matrices test.[...] Lynn's findings were debated in a series of articles for Nature.[...] ...


4

While you are probably better to ask your question over at the AI Stack Exchange for more practical answers on how to accomplish the task, I would also suggest you could take a look into the topics on Wikipedia for Sociolinguistics, and also Language and gender for the underlying theories as to why Machine learning models are able to make guesses/predictions ...


4

There has been a lot of debate amongst scientist, and they are not in agreement on any one argument. In general, there is a trend towards thinking that gender identity is based on biology. Argument that gender identity is based on biology: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150213112317.htm https://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/...


4

Johns Hopkins did stop doing gender reassignment surgery and one of their psychiatrists apparently says that The suicide rate among transgendered people who had the surgery is 20 times higher He also apparently says that transgenderism is a “mental disorder” that merits treatment, that sex change is “biologically impossible,” and that people who ...


4

Short answer There is no consistent evidence for the fact that women are better than men at multitasking. We do know that multitasking is detrimental for performance, whether it is forced or scheduled. Women do appear to be better at planning when to multitask and, in fact, do it less often than men. Counter-intuitively, women may give the impression to be ...


3

TL;DR: There's many studies which point to better mental health outcomes as a result of treatment, such as hormones and surgery, of transgender individuals. It's also important to consider that there's a range of gender identities and a range of treatments which are tailored to the individual. There's a lot of factors to consider. WPATH Standards of Care ...


3

So far, I've found that the American Psychiatric Association's DSM 5 has made it abundantly clear they no longer consider gender variance itself a disorder, to the point of a 2012 position statement on access to care, a 2012 "Position Statement on Discrimination Against Transgender and Gender Variant Individuals", and updated language in the DSM. It also ...


3

It is generally understood that girls develop a small to moderate deficit in math abilities, compared to boys, over the course of schooling, as measured by mean school grades or test scores (Hyde & Linn, 2006 give a number of .08 standard deviations in favor of men for mathematical problem solving on average, a larger effect favoring elementary school ...


3

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics the following is stated: Sex is a biological construct, what is real: Attributes that characterize biological maleness and femaleness including: Chromosomes Hormones Anatomy Gender is a social construct, or 'man-made': Attitudes and feelings that a given culture associates with a persons biological sex such ...


3

I think the answer to your questions is, yes, probably, and almost definitely. Not necessarily, but likely yes. "I will try to guess what sport you played based on your body type," is essentially turning a person into a guessing game. The fact that he is doing it based on the person's body (i.e., their concrete form and not their feelings or personality) ...


2

As far as I am aware, there is no such word in the English language as Philia, but it is a suffix within words. Also, the suffix of -philia in a word does not necessarily denote anything sexual. The -philia suffix denotes one of the following (Merriam-Webster, n.d.): friendly feeling toward(as in Francophilia) tendency toward(as in hemophilia) abnormal ...


2

TL;DR: Multiple approaches have been tried over many years. Current medical evidence strongly supports an "affirming approach" to alleviate gender dysphoria. "Corrective approaches" are considered unethical, and withholding treatment is not considered neutral. It's explained in the referenced AAP slides, e.g.: Children rejected and not supported are at ...


2

Gender identity, or the gender that a person feels they are (regardless of physical makeup) is usually imprinted in the neural circuits in early childhood. This could be genetic, environmental, or a combination of both. Gender identity can also change at various points in life, and can change from moment to moment within the course of a day. There are no ...


2

Craig Waldo (1999) is the only study I can find at the moment which sheds any light on the subject. Although negative social attitudes toward gay men and lesbians are often referred to as homophobia, several authors have argued that the term heterosexism is a more appropriate and inclusive concept (e.g., Herek, 1989; 1992; Lorde, 1984; Neisen, 1990). The ...


1

Gender is not, despite what others might say, a social construct, and neither is sexuality, just google David Rimmer to see what happens when researchers have messed with these. While we don't understand what causes homo-sexuality fully, typically speaking sexuality seems to be influenced by hormone exposure in the womb, when a human is a foetus. Although ...


1

Answer According to the American Association of Pediatrics Gender is a socially determined identity. Gender is based on how a person feels specifically as it relates to how the society that person lives in believes that biological sex should act. Each individual is unique, so each person's Gender should be considered unique, and each society in history has ...


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