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There is a good article on Wikipedia on the Neuroscience of Free Will, with far too much content to adequately summarize here. Since your question is focused on long-term prediction of behaviour, I'll just mention about that. Using newer fMRI technology, Soon et al (2008) used a learning algorithm to predict "free will" decisions from brain activity about ...


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[Just addressing your title question:] supposedly so, but there isn't a lot of data on this. One of David Buss' students has this in his PhD thesis: participants from the Austin community completed a survey instrument that asked a series of questions about their most memorable fantasy of killing someone else. Seventy-six percent of women and 91 ...


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What (with proper null and experimental method) do you mean by "heuristic"? What (with proper null and experimental method) do you mean by "instinct"? What (with proper null and experimental method) do mean by "considering"? This is a situation where psychological language meets the imperfections of experimental neuroscience. Typical neuroscience tasks ...


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Q: Could human decision making have evolved from food finding? A: The answer is yes, it probably could. But the more probable answer is that decision making in humans and other animals has evolved to increase the survival chance of humans and those animals and of their species. To increase the survival chance certainly requires good decision making to find ...


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C. elegans is the simplest model organism whose nervous system has been studied extensively. C. elegans certainly makes decisions; I would feel pretty confident in saying that decision making is an ubiquitous feature in the nervous system of freely moving animals. It is also non-controversial to consider more complex behaviors as having evolved from more ...


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I would argue that they are not the same, but you are correct that there could be some overlap. I think you will also find that people in different schools of thought might prefer a particular term for philosophical reasons in some situations, and in others the terms are more clearly distinct. I would say that volition involves conscious decisions to do ...


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This is a very interesting question. I think that there are many both conscious and unconscious factors that determine destructive behavior. The conflict between the id and super-ego (mediated by ego) can, at some level, be understood as a conflict between needs and social norms. Murder seems to be universally accepted as "bad behavior" so it must be coded ...


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