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12

So this may be long-winded, but I gotta get through some theoretical background first! Conceptual Act Theory If we take from the Conceptual Act Theory (CAT) of emotions (Barrett, 2014), then we can consider emotions like fear to be what are called "situated conceptualizations." This means that we feel an emotion when we make meaning out of our situated ...


11

Worldbuilding may have beaten you to this: https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/99881/15591 Williams Syndrome is not, strictly-speaking a purely mental condition. It is "caused by a genetic abnormality" and commonly leads to problems "with teeth, heart problems, especially supravalvular aortic stenosis, and periods of high blood calcium". But, ...


11

Some neurodegenerative diseases cause extreme gullibility, in particular Alzheimer Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the scientists were able to determine which parts of the brain govern a person’s ability to identify sarcasm and lies. The images revealed the associations between the deteriorations of particular parts of the brain and the ...


11

This is a great question. There isn't a single reason for this phenomenon. There is a genetic predisposition to certain fears. Though humans are bad at statistics, evolution is quite good at it. So if there is a benefit to having a fear response to something, whereby it increases the chances of survival to reproduction, then it is more likely to ...


10

This was much longer than I expected! There's quite a bit of ground to cover, but I try to go over it quickly. So, there are two implicit theoretical assumptions in your question: We have an "affect program" for fear in our brain (e.g., Ekman & Cordaro, 2011). When the fear program is activated, a specific pattern of changes in experience, behavior, ...


9

Alright, so my familiarity with this area primarily comes from Vanessa LoBue's work. And what I get from her research is that we don't really know if certain fears are innate or acquired. LoBue seems to favor a prepared learning model, which is just as it sounds. Infants are not born fearful of things like spiders, snakes, and heights (Adolph, Kretch, &...


7

What you are describing is most likely avoidance, which in itself isn't a disorder. People are most likely afraid of the illness in itself, and so not going to the doctor means that they don't have to confront the possibility of having that illness. This avoidance is a mechanism that maintains hypochondria or health anxiety (however you wish to call it) by ...


6

What you are talking about is the powerful technique of Compartmentalisation. As highlighted in the Wikipedia link I provided here, normally speaking (emphasis mine) Compartmentalization is a subconscious psychological defense mechanism used to avoid cognitive dissonance, or the mental discomfort and anxiety caused by a person's having conflicting values,...


6

A fear of heights on buildings is very common because there are natural vestibular and vertigo responses within certain height ranges. Furthermore, the effect is heightened if you're exposed to the elements out on a balcony as opposed to within the building. Fear of flying is almost always related to the sensations of landing and taking off. If you've ...


5

The terminology in this area can be a source of confusion because sensitization is not usually meant as the opposite of desensitization but of habituation. E.g., Blumstein (2016) People have written about habituation, a process that leads to decreased responsiveness to a stimulus, as well as its counterpart, sensitization, or an increased responsiveness ...


4

Reminds me a bit of existential therapy and humanistic psychology in general. Unconditional positive regard and motivational interviewing both insist on approaching undesirable feelings from the client's perspective without imposing fixes or changes on the person through pressure or blunt confrontationality. Existential theory even presumes major, inevitable ...


4

Might be Uncanny Valley The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of human aesthetics which holds that when human features look and move almost, but not exactly, like natural human beings, it causes a response of revulsion among some human observers. Examples can be found in the fields of robotics,1 3D computer animation,[2][3] and in medical fields ...


4

The interactions among several factors probably account for variability in reactivity to stressful events, including genetics, epigenetics, early life experience, and culture (e.g., Alexander et al., 2009; Boyce & Ellis, 2005; Francis, Frances, Liu, & Meaney, 2006; Gunthert et al., 2007; Meaney, 2001). And individual differences are observable at ...


4

The 5F response (fright/flight/fight/freeze/fawn response) to threats is responsible for both situations. Specifically, among other reactions, the 5F response causes the following: [emphasis mine] Catecholamine hormones, such as adrenaline (epinephrine) or noradrenaline (norepinephrine), facilitate immediate physical reactions associated with a ...


4

Just because two phenomena (partially!) share brain architecture does not mean they are experientially similar or opposite. There is little understanding of how neuronal activity creates conscious experiences. There is a lot of controversy in taxonomies of emotion because it is not clear what the emotions are or how many there are. Also, note that ...


3

The most conservative answer is that we can reliably distinguish anger from fear if we constrain our examination to a particular context, a set of stimuli, or a person. However, studies on emotions within single individuals have only begun to attract funding, so we don't quite know yet how well we can do this. If we ignore contextual and individual ...


2

Those are different phobias with different names: Acrophobia- Fear of heights. Altophobia- Fear of heights. Batophobia- Fear of heights or being close to high buildings. Aviophobia or Aviatophobia- Fear of flying. Pteromerhanophobia- Fear of flying. In fear of flying is fear of loosing control, fear of not trusting someone else. In fear of heights is ...


2

I'm no expert on imminent death handling but I have some concepts to share. My suggestions are general suggestions that don't only apply for this scenario but that can be applied more generally, including that scenario. Overcoming fear of death already is not easy, having to do it in an expedited fashion is even more challenging. Fear of death comes from ...


2

This is because human beings assess the probabilty of an event in a roughly proportional dependence of the emotions its imagination triggers or the emotion its experience triggered. I have read of a study - sorry can't find the source but anyway it serves as a good illustration of my point - that people when asked will attach a higher probabilty to the ...


2

Those courses you mention are a part of a much larger "personal development" market that really boomed in the 90s, and keeps going on ever since. There's a book called "Letting go: a pathway of surrender" and the part that really jumped at me is that the author lists dozens of different flavors of that "personal development" offerings: “Well,” you say, ...


2

As a sort of partial answer, but since it's too much to add to the question itself... a more encompassing question would be whether fear conditioning can occur without awareness of the conditioning event happening at all. I suppose an affirmative answer to the latter implies the answer is also "yes" to my question because forgetting the association event ...


2

Short answer Paranoid personality disorder and social anxiety disorder come to mind. Background Perhaps you are after paranoia, which is thinking and feeling as if you are under threat even though there is no (or very little) evidence that you are. Paranoid thoughts can also be described as delusions. Paranoid thoughts can be exaggerated suspicions, e.g..,...


2

TLDR: the hypothalamus is involved in fear processing, but not in the way you think. Wikipedia has a decently sourced article on the hypothalamus and it does play some role in fear processing: Fear processing The medial zone of hypothalamus is part of a circuitry that controls motivated behaviors, like defensive behaviors.[29] Analyses of Fos-...


2

There are situations as you mentioned where light can be from below, but they are extremely rare in our evolutionary past. Fire is quite recent: remove that one. Reflections from water or snow would require very strong light from above, so those are essentially removed as well. I think the creepiness comes from the unfamiliarity. Also see the Uncanny Valley, ...


2

Coulrophobia is a fear of clowns. It is a phobia not (yet?) acknowledged by the WHO or the APA as a disorder. Nonetheless it seems to be an accepted phobia in hospitalized children (Meiri et al, 2017). The Guardian has a very interesting popular scientific account on the causes of coulrophobia. The author brings up the following two convincing arguments ...


1

I do not believe compartmentalization is the answer to the original question. The original question is about naming, identifying, not separating which is compartmentalization. Two people can have exactly the same knowledge and one can compartmentalize and the other cannot. The fallout of that is that one person may have more anxiety than the other as ...


1

Short answer You are almost there. The 5F (fright/flight/fight/freeze/fawn) response to threats is an unconscious reflex which in brief follows as Threat → Fear → Response. With classical conditioning, this occurs when an unconditioned response (an unlearned reflex response e.g. salivation) is turned into a conditioned response (a learned reflex response) ...


1

Taken from here The Fear Paralysis Reflex begins to function very early after conception and should normally be integrated before birth. It can be seen in the womb as movement of the head, neck and body in response to threat. It is sometimes classified as a withdrawal reflex rather than a primitive reflex. If this reflex is retained after ...


1

Can information in the media increase fear of something? Yes of course, let's see what these learning processes are. Common processes employed by psychology in order to explain the development of anxiety, fear and phobias are the vicarious learning processes (modeling, observational learning and social learning). Vicarious learning, although the terms ...


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