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Bottom line: No, Josh Pellicer's work is not based on science, not tested, nor peer-reviewed. However, I will qualify this statement slightly below. Many years ago, I listened to a few episodes of the The Tom Leykis Show, yet another highly sexist advice columnnist for men. Josh Pellicer is not the first, and certainly not the last, in a long line of ...


12

I don't think you need to resort to hormonal or neural explanations. Staring has social meaning. The meaning of staring varies across cultures and contexts. In some contexts it is normal (e.g., staring at a presenter, staring at the person you are talking to, staring at a sales assistant). In these contexts, staring has meaning such as indicating interest or ...


7

Nocturnal lagophthalmos is the search term you're looking for. But it's less that they "can" fall asleep with their eyes open and more that they "can't" close their eyes during sleep: Nocturnal lagophthalmos is the inability to close the eyelids during sleep. Lagophthalmos is associated with exposure keratopathy, poor sleep, and persistent exposure-...


7

Eye contact is one of the principal cues humans use to evaluate where other people direct their attention. A special issue on the use of eye tracking in the Infancy journal and other studies reported that infants' eyes are useful measures of attention over a range of task domains including object perception (Johnson, Slemmer, & Amso, 2004), faces (Hunnis ...


6

In general, evidence suggests that we are attracted to contrast rather than brightness (luminance). For example, the onset of a bright light on a dark background is often used as an exogenous cue for visual attention, but a dark cue on a bright background works just as well. So, signs generally aim to be high contrast against their background. Contrast shows ...


6

It has been theorized that it has to do with "visualizing" dreams, but the movements themselves are by virtue of the pattern of electrical activity as the waves travel between the Pons (in the brainstem), Geniculate nuclei (in the thalamus), and Occipital lobe. From PGO Waves PGO waves and REM sleep PGO waves are an integral part of rapid eye ...


6

Short answer We have a lot of control over our eye movements, including saccades. We can suppress saccades and make an anti-saccade instead. So can monkeys, our close cousins. Children have a lot more difficulty with the anti-saccade task, however. Background Saccades are fast eye movements, as opposed to the slower smooth-pursuit responses of the eye (...


5

While eye contact is certainly important in social interaction I think you should beware pseudoscientific dating advice based on manufacturing "attraction" between men and women. Since this site is about science, let me point to a couple of areas of empirical research looking at eye contact. First, there are quite a few experimental papers showing that (...


5

I agree with much of AliceD's well-cited answer, but here are a few extras. What part of the brain is actively controlling saccadic movement? It is not clear how you would choose just one area of the brain, given that a whole network of cortical and sub-cortical areas are involved, and what you mean by "actively controlling". The superior ...


5

The superior colliculus can be regarded as the center of saccadic eye movement. It contains a topographically organized representation of the visual space in its upper layers, and saccade-related activity in its deeper layers (Van Gisbergen et al., 1987). Ablation of the superior colliculus unilaterally eliminates saccades contralateral to the lesion, and ...


5

I don't have a complete answer, but I'll add on to Christian's comment. I'm not really familiar with an evolutionary account of facial expressions, but folks like Adam K. Anderson have implied that the original use of facial features for sensory sampling have been co-opted for social use (e.g., to indicate attention, which Christian pointed out, or affect, ...


5

binocular coordination Linked below is a general overview of binocular coordination which also describes how, due to independent saccades events, mammalian eyes are generally not actually very well "synchronized". Kirkby JA, Webster LA, Blythe HI, Liversedge SP. (2008) Binocular coordination during reading and non-reading tasks. Psychol Bull. 134(5):742-63 ...


4

I have listed several articles below for your reference: (Search terms: "oculometry pupillometry disorders of consciousness" in Google Scholar, nothing special): Grandchamp et al, 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00031 - A primary research article related to consciousness (mind wandering) where the authors investigated various pupillometric responses, among ...


4

I believe this tutorial covers exactly what you are looking for. It describes how to use a relatively cheap kit ($150) to detect eye movements and eye blinks. It includes software and hardware information.


3

If the question means in which of the option pairs is the second one more attention-grabbing, I would guess d. a. Light to dark (shade) - I would say that visual attention is automatically drawn to bright areas in the visual field, so, exactly the opposite. b. Large to small (size) - exactly the opposite again, bigger objects would be more attention-...


3

Short answer Smooth-pursuit eye movements require something to pursuit. Intentionally attempting to make such an eye movement in the absence of an appropriate moving visual target will result in a saccade instead. Background Your question concerns two types of basic eye movements, namely saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements. Saccades are rapid movements ...


2

EYE RELAXATION Sit comfortably, close your eyes and cover them with your palms. Be sure that both palms are cupped and do not press on the eyes. Imagine the blackness getting darker and darker. Rest in this manner for five minutes at a time, at least thrice a day. Stand upright in front of an open window, preferably overlooking greenery. Keep your feet a ...


2

This answer is going to be pure speculation as I don't have any references handy, but I would argue that fixing gaze on a single spot in the world provides three separate benefits for balance. All of these benefits are related to the fact that when you are not moving very much, fixating your gaze on a single spot in the external world also tends to "lock" ...


2

This is an old question, but the following paper might be useful. The authors describe an algorithm of real-time prediction of saccadic landing point. The algorithm they use is based on a compressed exponential function. Basically, you collect the position samples from an eye-tracker, check if the speed is more than some threshold (e.g., 20 deg/s), then ...


2

Interesting question! Trying to interpret your question, I think what you are after is a model that can predict the saccade endpoint based on eye tracking data? The following answer is more of a basic neuroscientific approach: The neuronal responses (spike rates) in the superior colliculus (SC) can be accurately used to predict the total saccade as a ...


2

Philip from iMotions here. Appreciate the mention, and yes for a simple streaming of data, our solutions are probably overkill. We do however offer real automatic gaze mapping in the cloud as well as auto segmentation which saves a ton of time We also offer LSL in our latest version but yes SMI doesn't support the previous SDK. I'll listen in and hope ...


2

Detecting eye movements is generally referred to as oculometry. Oculometry can be performed using your suggested approach, namely with electrophysiological techniques. In this case the recordings are based on the dipole character of the eye. This characteristic results in detectable voltage differences when the eye moves with respect to a stationary ...


2

Short answer The retinal image cannot be refocused on an intermediate target during a saccade. Background Psychophysical experiments have shown that during a saccade, attention is aimed at the target location. Instructing the subject to make a saccade from location A to C, while focusing on another point B proved impossible. The authors conclude that: ...


2

This is potentially an example of a top-down influence on the visual system. That is, if the experiment demonstrates as expected, that priming the visual system with a word influences the pattern of eye movements (compared to not priming) when free-viewing the following object, then that would support the conclusion of a top-down mechanism at work. In ...


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