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I'm one of the developers of the Miniscope. We have been very happy with #FL-2-C from dragonfly. This commutator is very low torque and we have never had an issue with sending power or data through it. The key is to minimize the length of non-coax cabling coming out of the top and bottom of the commutator. We trim the lead wires short and solder coax ...


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I am wondering whether converting someone's memory into digital data is possible or not. Not today, but it is an active area of research. One non-profit foundation, headed by computational neuroscientist Dr. Randal A. Koene (see also his personal website), that is working in this field is Carbon Copies. Dr. Koene, in collaboration dozens of others and the ...


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Brain death is defined as the complete and permanent loss of brain function (1), or complete, irreversible cessation of brain function (2), or irreversible cessation of all functions of the whole brain (3). Therefore, according to these definitions, once brain death occurs, it cannot be reversed, and even if one tries to treat this condition by any treatment ...


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We have found CRJ-05 to work fine for rats. It requires a bit of starting torque (~0.4N*cm), so may not work for mice. It is designed for high frequency coax communication though. The quote we received was ~$250. http://www.barlintimes.com/product/coax-rotary-joint/high-frequency-rotary-joint.html


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I wouldn't know why multi-site cortical extracellular recordings would not be feasible? What would the practical experimental or technical limitation be in your opinion? As long as you have a multichannel amplifier suitable for extracellular recording and you consider the choice between using a common reference, i.e., monopolar recordings (Ludwig et al., ...


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The full connectome of C. elegans (Fig. 1.) is described by Farber (2012) and as far as I know, the most complete data on C. elegans, including its connectome is available from the OpenWorm Project found here. Fig. 1. C. elegans connectome. image source: Farber (2012) Reference - Farber, Sci Am February 2012 Further reading - Are there organisms with ...


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I think the key term here is dwell time. There is abundant literature on this. For example, Sample et al. (2008), go into quite some detail as to how to calculate this. In a nutshell, it basically boils down to defining a cluster of pixels around the mouse pointer tip. If the mouse cursor stays within those bounds, the clock should start ticking. A certain ...


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The ideal impedance of any electrode aimed at recording low-amplitude neural signals (barred suction glass-pipette electrodes for patch clamping) is simply: as low as possible. In case of tetrodes, i.e., electrodes consisting of a bundle of four microwires that can record from multiple neurons simultaneously in the brain of freely moving animal, they are ...


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I haven't seen any either. But what I do know is that there is a wireless version coming out. It Might make sense to wait for one since commutators tend to be expensive.


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NeuroTek Inc (neurotek.ca) specializes in motorized commutators and is in the process of building a commutator to handle digital and analog. Specifically it is being built for mini microscopes and electrophys. Contact neurotek@gmx.com for more information.


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You could solve this problem telling your participant that they have to answer as soon as they spot the right answer or if you do not want them to answer before the end of the stimuli you can disable answers before the end of the stimuli (normally you write what you expect in the experiment introduction screen). If you let (want) your participant to answer ...


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I think there are many ways to accomplish this in terms of technical detail, but they will all boil down to measuring the arrival of an action potential along the axon on at least two points with known distance from each other on the axon. From these two arrival times the latency can be deducted. Then, by dividing the distance between the elektrodes by the ...


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I would also like to plug Markus Meister’s blog: https://markusmeister.com Jeremy Borniger’s blog and journal club: https://jeremyborniger.com/new-blog The Spike on Medium curated by Mark Humphries and curated by others; probably the closest to what you are looking for: https://medium.com/the-spike Inscopix’s corporate blog: https://media.inscopix.com ...


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Also check: https://bitsandbrains.io/ https://www.talyarkoni.org/blog/ calling it a blog is too much but sometimes we share stuff: kordinglab.com But also, there is maybe a bit more of a culture of publishing thoughts in papers in the field.


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According to these three published studies I found below - reaction time is slower when depth disparity information is withheld, as to whether or not that extra information is actually encoded in the brain is still an open question. This first paper by Young Lim Lee; Jeffrey A. Saunders used left and right eye rendered images of novel 3D shapes with and ...


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MMN/MMR refer to responses during an oddball paradigm. The typical arrangement of this sort of paradigm is to have a sequence of stimuli, for example, a sequence of tones of one frequency, followed by either the same tone (standard) or a different tone (oddball). For EEG, they are the same thing. Mismatch negativity is a particular response in the EEG ...


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Improving labeling Increasing the amount of data that humans can annotate in a reasonable amount of time (your second question), one essentially needs to develop better labeling tools. Typically, this can either involve nicer interfaces or training ML algorithms to propose labels which humans can then more easily confirm or improve. I recently attended a ...


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I am not from a pure field of neuroscience so I did a bit of research. (Part put in bold by me is the bit which pertains to Bipolar Disorder (BPD)) Simon N Young of McGill University in Montréal, Quebec, Canada said in ResearchGate: While catecholamines and serotonin in the blood and urine are not derived from the brain sometimes, for reasons that are ...


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PET (positron emission tomography) will measure glucose consumption, e.g. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2147116 fMRI will measure changes in blood flow, or more precisely measuring the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response. https://www.nature.com/scitable/blog/brain-metrics/what_does_fmri_measure Note that I'm being a bit simplistic here, as ...


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Let's work backwards. I don't currently have access to means to use transgenic orexin knockout mice as are mentioned in the article by Tsujino & Sakurai (though if anyone's used them before I'd be interested to know for the future) Just so we're on the same page: orexin knockout mice lack orexin receptors. Have you considered finding a highly ...


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Short answer Peripheral nerves can be stimulated by, e.g., electrical pulses and their responses can be recorded back by using recording electrodes. Peripheral nerves generally do not process the signal. However, they can, and likely will, behave in a nonlinear manner, meaning that their transfer characteristics may change over time, depending on the ...


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