7 votes

Does gender as a factor always make my experiment quasi-experimental?

If your experiment is preselecting and assigning participants non-randomly, such as using sex as the main factor to partition participant groups and responses, then yes it is quasi-experimental design....
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  • 1,135
5 votes

In general, how does one resolve two competing theories in Psychology?

Almost every pair of theories on that list sets up a false dichotomy. It is not an issue of one theory over another; at issue is how much different explanations apply to different circumstances. ...
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  • 6,174
5 votes
Accepted

How to measure stress quantitatively?

When your goals is to measure one option over the other As part of a Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) study I also needed to measure cognitive load in order to assess whether a particular user ...
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  • 3,471
5 votes

Do the results of psychological studies change our behaviour?

I do have to note this question is broad and opinion based, according to the stack conventions. Nonetheless, I think it's an important question, given that scientific publications may alter the ...
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5 votes
Accepted

What variables allow one to empirically and scientifically quantify trends for learning curves?

Short answer In psychophysical tests, often %correct rates are determined. Hence, training effects are often measured by determining correct rates. The ultimate outcome measures can be wildly variable,...
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4 votes
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How to measure and quantify concentration or focus?

Short answer Attention can be quantified with a sustained attention to response task. Background I think with focus or concentration you mean sustained attention to a certain task. A sustained ...
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4 votes
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How to report a quasi-experiment in APA?

The distinction between experiment and quasi-experiment is often made in undergraduate psychology courses. In general, the term quasi-experiment is used to identify studies that fall short of a ...
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3 votes
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How is the term "physiological measurement" defined?

Physiology is a very broad term that includes neuroscience: Physiology is the scientific study of the functions and mechanisms which work within a living system. Within the cognitive sciences, ...
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3 votes

How can I run a placebo medication pills study? Practical advice needed

Ethical procedures are specific to your country and even differ between universities and sometimes even per department. Of course you know everything about the Declaration of Helsinki, being immersed ...
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3 votes
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What is a "norming experiment"?

Yes, a norming experiment is an experiment looking to establish what (if any) is the perceptual norm for a given stimulus, i.e. the level of the stimulus that appears neutral. In the paper you ...
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  • 9,915
3 votes
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Which experimental design is this? Factorial vs within groups

Let us see first what it is not: Not a within subjects design. To be an within subjects experiment, you need a repeated measure, something that you would test for each individual multiple times. E.g.:...
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  • 399
3 votes
Accepted

What are the benefits of giving feedback to subjects during a discrimination task?

Short answer Giving subjects feedback may affect their performance over time because of learning effects. The choice of giving feedback may be far less trivial than subjects getting bored yes or no. ...
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3 votes

Experimental design with two groups, pre-post measurement, and where everyone is treated

I would call it a pre-post quasi-experiment, albeit where you are assessing the intervention in two different pre-existing groups. In terms of assessing the effect of the intervention, there are more ...
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3 votes

Which is a better statistical option to compare differences across groups?

If you have single-trial data, the drift-diffusion model/DDM and related models, originating with Roger Ratcliff (1976/1978), can simultaneously fit the whole response distribution, both RTs and ...
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  • 2,414
3 votes

How do psychologists measure malicious behaviour?

The Dark Triad maybe what you are seeking. You have described the behaviours as "malicious", where as the Dark Triad uses the word "malevolent". The Oxford Dictionary advises that ...
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  • 1,688
3 votes
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Why use a quasi experimental design when you can do an experiment?

The first paper I found searching for "advantages of quasi-experimental design" was this one: Schweizer, M. L., Braun, B. I., & Milstone, A. M. (2016). Research methods in healthcare epidemiology ...
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  • 6,174
3 votes

Which experiment design is this? Between and within combined

If I understand your description correctly, you have one within-subject factor with two levels (certain/uncertain) and one between-subject factor (based on how you assign the different text snippets ...
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2 votes

How to convince subjects that the computer is playing fairly

I'm imagining a system that chooses the computer's response not in a stochastic manner, but chaotically. Suppose you have some chaotic mapping function from the [0,1] interval to the {heads, tails} ...
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2 votes

Does work exist on relative valuations versus numeric valuations?

Short answer Sensory systems in general operate on a relative basis. Hence, seemingly objective rating scales are often still relative, because subjects implicitly, or explicitly compare previous ...
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2 votes

Understanding a negative correlation between Pc and signal strength

I find that it is the signal strength of the second signal that more so determines correct detection (0,1) The ideal unbiased observer bases the decision on $X1-X2$ while it sounds like your subjects ...
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  • 2,617
2 votes

At what time in a psychophysical test are catch trials preferably presented?

Short answer Based on the experimental restrictions provided in the question and comments, my best bet would be to include 6 catch trials and to randomly present them from trial 6 and onward. Trials 1 ...
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2 votes

What would the effect on psychology experiments be if we found out that one person sees blue if another sees red?

While the sensation of color is well defined, the perception of color is indeed shrouded in ambiguity (Brainard, 2001). There are no colors, just electromagnetic radiations that oscillate in different ...
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2 votes
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Is it recommendable to put participants in different conditions across trials?

It depends on what you care to investigate. Do you care what happens when one person gets two hard questions as compared to someone who gets two easy ones? If so, record it for analysis. If not, ...
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  • 136
2 votes
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What is an empirical proof that two concepts are not independent/orthogonal?

Since the data show a two-way dependence (low A -> low B, hi A -> hi B and the reverse) this would prove the variables are not independent, as Linearly independent, orthogonal, and uncorrelated ...
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2 votes

How do psychologists measure malicious behaviour?

"Malicious behavior" is not a term with a specific definition in psychology; if you search Google Scholar for "malicious behavior" + psychology you receive relatively few results and I see no evidence ...
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  • 6,174
2 votes

How do psychologists measure malicious behaviour?

Here is a scale on benign and malicious envy. It isn't exactly what you want, but it may contain some citations that are of interest you. I believe they also mention the dark triad, which @Tony Mobbs ...
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  • 121
2 votes

What is the difference between "target" and "foil" in experimental design?

A target is: A stimulus that a research participant or subject is searching for or trying to concentrate on, and that in research is often accompanied by distractors. And a foil is: In ...
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