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The first method (repeat the terms over and over) is called rote rehearsal. It's not actually a very good way to learn, though it has the benefit that it always "works" because you can always repeat a list. You may be unable to perform certain other encoding tricks such as elaborative rehearsal due to the context of the items, like a list of random words. ...


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TL;DR: We don't know whether the brain really uses predictive coding or not. But neurally computing an error signal on a small scale is possible (see below). Predictive coding is an hypothesis for a putative signal-processing mechanism used in vertebrate brains. As things stand presently (2017), mapping the hypothesis of predictive coding onto known neural ...


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I provided an answer to a similar question here that limitedly deals with the role of biological prediction errors. Here's an excerpt of that answer: ...to answer this properly, we must first make it clear that there are potentially dozens, hundreds, or an arbitrarily high number of other "prediction error types" in use by the brain. Here are just ...


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Probably because describing each element involve a deeper process of information for your students (they have to organize their knowledge to understand what is it and how it relate to the other parts). Look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levels-of-processing_effect


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Ebbinghouse indeed only tested on himself, limiting the generalization of his findings. Your question is a really good one; given the time of his writing, the now so familiar structure of a standard journal paper (Abstract, Introduction, M&M, Results, Discussion) is not present in his monograph. However, tucked away in the text on p. 51 of 100 in this ...


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