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12

Ironically enough, Wikipedia does offer as meaningful a distinction as any of the answers here so far: The term sociopathy may have been first introduced in 1909 in Germany by biological psychiatrist Karl Birnbaum and in 1930 in the US by educational psychologist George E. Partridge, as an alternative to, or a subtype of, the concept of psychopathy.[137] It ...


10

I'm including some relevant papers below, but one important thing to note abot this whole compassion/Buddhism/neuroscience discussion is that neuroscience may not necessarily have the most to say about developing empathy/love/compassion (ELC), especially as compared to "real-world," social psychological, or behavioral measures linking prosocial behavior to ...


6

Psychopathy is a diagnosis with high reliability and validity, which is based on research originally begun by psychologist Robert Hare and now continued by many others. It is often used in forensic settings, and its use requires specialized training. Sociopathy isn't a diagnosis and has no generally accepted clinical definition (unless it's in the ICD, ...


6

In this answer, I'm going to use "self" to describe the person who is empathizing and "other" as the person who is the target of that empathy (the person who's trying to be related to). The most advance model of empathy (in terms of affective empathy and emotional contagion) that I know of is featured in "A Recipe for Empathy" by Lim et al. which is based ...


5

Yes. Emoji smiles are contagious just like real human smiles. As this study suggest the brain activity observed when people look at emojis is the same when we look at real faces, and subsequently mimicry and emotion contagion follows. We presented 20 participants with images of upright and inverted faces, emoticons and meaningless strings of ...


4

Cognitive science generally does not try to explain individual behavior, but rather the behavior of all people. We can meaningfully speak about what may cause a deficient ability to feel guilt and remorse, or other features that characterize an individual, but we cannot speak directly about the individual's behavior outside an applied or clinical context. ...


3

My sister and I are both introverts, and have been talking about this before. We have agreed about the following: When being social, we feel like we are obliged\expected to do\say certain things and avoid doing\saying others. We are supposed to ... go where the others go. be nice and agree rather than say what we think do the same activity as everyone else ...


2

Interesting question. I have thought about this a lot, and while I cannot offer a conclusive answer, I can offer some ideas that stem from scientific literature. I should note that this question may technically be considered off-topic, as it seems to be looking for a diagnosis (and self-help questions are prohibited on this website). However, for the sake ...


2

There are many issues packed into this question. I am pretty sure the answers will lead to many more questions. People diagnosed with autism tend to perform worse than the average population on standard IQ tests, but there is evidence that alternative measures of "intelligence" (whatever that is) are more accurate and demonstrate that autistic persons, as a ...


2

Here is very nice article about difference: http://knowledgenuts.com/2013/11/03/the-difference-between-psychopaths-and-sociopaths/ Here is some history of psychopathy diagnosis: http://law.jrank.org/pages/1884/Psychopathy-What-psychopathy.html In short APA made fusion of sociopathy and psychopathy diagnosis in DSM, but lot of researches was conducted in ...


2

My understanding of the distinction is that psychopaths are the way they are from birth, while sociopaths become antisocial due to upbringing or other environmental factors. As well, psychopaths have a high tendency towards violence but generally low impulsiveness, while sociopaths may not be as violent but have high impulsiveness. Diffen has a nice and ...


2

I'd go for the jugular in non-empathetics: sociopaths and psychopaths, people who clinically lack the ability to empathize. There is a difference in their brains. You might be interested in the story of the neuroscientist Dr. James Fallon.. Fallon wanted to identify lack of empathy as a brain patern. He had PET scans of serial killers mixed with a host of ...


2

I have found that there is a term which encompasses the phenomenon of both positive and negative emotions spreading from person to person and that is Emotional Contagion. Hatfield et al. (1993) points out that emotions can be "caught" in several different ways and outlines 3 propositions. Mimicry In conversation, people automatically and continually ...


1

The short answer — TLDR The answer to this question within the field of psychology will depend on the psychological approach the answerer is affiliated to. In short, while a certain amount of empathy is required in both the 2 main lines of thought — after-all, how are you going to be an effective therapist without it? — the way it is to be shown is down to ...


1

I believe that in the first part there is some confusion of empathy and self-concept ("Does Not Describe Me Well" to "Describes Very Well"), although the basic statement refers to empathy that question is made to measure self-concept of empathy. The vast majority of tests (which do not measure performance) measure self-concept dimensions. Of course you can ...


1

Empathy can be measured in many different ways. As this source outlines: Psychologists distinguish between measurements of situational empathy—that is, empathic reactions in a specific situation—and measurements of dispositional empathy, where empathy is understood as a person's stable character trait. Situational empathy is measured either by ...


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