6

It is possible for someone to have an eating disorder without weight and body esteem issues (Sarkar, et al. 2013), but not Anorexia. Fear of becoming fat or gaining weight and having a distorted view of themselves and of their condition are criteria required in the Diagnostics and Statistical Manual which is used for diagnosing mental health problems. ...


6

The answer to this question is indeed: We don't know - as @ChrisRogers correctly explained. However, let me mention some related research that may help shed some light on the question. Recently, there have been several highly publicized studies suggesting that psychedelic drugs can be useful in the treatment of addiction. A few of these preliminary studies ...


4

That's a question of definition. Anorexia can be either a mental health issue or a symptom. If by anorexia you mean anorexia nervosa, then per definition it's an eating disorder, that among other things, implies body image issues. Notice however, that anorexia can also simply mean the symptom, which is a pathological lack of appetite. In this case, it's a ...


3

I haven't got half an hour at the moment to sit and watch this video at the moment, but there can be many reasons someone with religious convictions may be able to abstain from addictive behaviours. It is impossible, to determine categorically what exactly invoked the change from a neurological point of view scientifically and from a psychology stand point ...


3

This could be ARFID or OFSED. ARFID Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is a new diagnosis in the DSM-5, and was previously referred to as “Selective Eating Disorder.” ARFID is similar to anorexia in that both disorders involve limitations in the amount and/or types of food consumed, but unlike anorexia, ARFID does not involve any distress ...


3

Short answer According to a study dating 6 years back, the incidence rate of anorexia nervosa was stable over several decades. Background According to a review paper published in 2012, the overall incidence rate of eating disorders, including anorexia, was stable over the previous decades. However, there was an increase found in the high risk-group of 15–...


2

From my reading, I believe that anorexics can see others in the same way as us or they can also see other anorexics as normal. It seems that anorexics don't necessarily hallucinate rolls of fat or other shape differences between healthy and overweight or obese people. Thomas et al. (2012) describes the case of ‘Ms A’, who described herself as having ‘3% of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible