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Environmental psychological conditions (conditions triggered by an event arising from another person's actions or other event external to the person) will have the same name irrespective of whether they might have been predisposed to it, more vulnerable to it, or neither. The question is very broad as there are many different conditions which can arise, ...


6

The first stop when a non-emergency medical issue evolves is, as you say, a visit to the GP. This is not a supplement to diagnosis. Instead, a visit to the GP can be a critical step in the treatment process and a GP will assess what the most probable underlying cause is during a consultation, based on a physical examination and verbal communications. Then ...


4

The general symptoms (NOT the background scenario) may point to a psychological disorter called social phobia : Social anxiety disorder (SAD), also known as social phobia, is an anxiety disorder characterized by a significant amount of fear in one or more social situations, causing considerable distress and impaired ability to function in at least some ...


4

Here are some basics on the diagnostic process: There are two main sources of disagreement in assessing psychiatric disorder or, as Feinstein (1985) wrote, 'two different phases of the observational process'. First, in the assessment of psychopathology; to transform ' the observed phenomena into certain raw elements of descriptive data'. ...


3

The DSM-5 is the current version of the diagnostic manual of the APA. It's hard to say there is any such thing as a "strict neuro-psychiatric" definition; these definitions are by their nature not strict at all, but the DSM is probably the closest thing to some level of unified understanding in the field. That doesn't mean everyone agrees with it - ...


2

Short answer Paranoid personality disorder and social anxiety disorder come to mind. Background Perhaps you are after paranoia, which is thinking and feeling as if you are under threat even though there is no (or very little) evidence that you are. Paranoid thoughts can also be described as delusions. Paranoid thoughts can be exaggerated suspicions, e.g..,...


2

Short answer Many people in the general populace suffer one or more negative symptoms that are associated with schizophrenia, but are not diagnosed with a mental illness whatsoever. Background Indeed, for a diagnosis of schizophrenia, negative symptoms alone are not enough. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (DSM-5), to ...


2

This is Unilateral Control Model of Behaviour. The opposite is "Give Up Control Model" and in the middle, you have "Mutual Learning". You can see another copy of Unilateral Control's definition here. Having goals is essential to being effective as an individual, team, and organization. But when you use a unilateral control mindset, you see challenging ...


2

An article on the NCBI website states Many clinicians are reluctant to diagnose personality disorders (PDs) during youth, viewing paediatric personality deviations instead as reflective of given developmental stages. This is so despite evidence that certain youth are indeed at risk for the eventual development of PDs as adults. Unfortunately, late ...


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It is tempting to think of medical diagnoses as a recipe. In some cases, it is a lot easier than others to see it that way. It would seem that if you have a broken leg, you have a broken leg. Unfortunately, both physical and mental health diagnoses are rarely that straightforward. In mental health, when a person comes in complaining of e.g. anxiety, ...


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Apart from the DSM-5, the World Health Organisation maintains the International Classification of Diseases, currently on it's 11th revision (ICD-11). It contains far more than just psychological disorders, but these are included.


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As @BryanKrause said; mental illness and neurodevelopmental conditions are not distinctively separable. Example: Neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, Obsessions and compulsions in Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism Etc.


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If we consider the field of psychiatry, usually a comorbidity is understood as the simultaneous occurrence of two or more mental disorders in the same person. But attention can also treat physical comorbidity, when there is coexistence of physical and mental pathologies for example. But that does not clarify your question. Sometimes DSM can help and ...


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