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You wrote: For the purposes of this question I would assume that it's fairly common knowledge in psychology that people touch nose or cover the mouth when saying something part of them does not believe to be true. Avoid make assumptions like this. This is not common knowledge, and in fact it is not even true. Vrij et al. (2010) discuss the literature on ...


7

Backstrom et al (2009) have a paper devoted to the question of whether the intercorrelations between the Big 5 scales is due to social desirability bias or substantive factors. In Study 2 they re-wrote each item on a 100 item IPIP scale so that each item had reduced positive bias. They then administered the original and neutrally worded items to a sample of ...


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In a previous post on the global personality factor, you provided examples to describe how self-report items indicating higher trait levels are phrased in more socially desirable terms, hence the positive bias. I think it's important to distinguish between two (or three) kinds of biases here: one is related to the wording/content of the items (the positive ...


3

It is not entirely clear whether you are asking how much weight should we place on different cues (if we want to spot liars) or how much people actually do use these cues. There is a big literature on lie detection though. Here is a recent paper that discusses some of this work and will give you a start. Some of the salient points are: People are actually ...


2

Short answer I think you are referring to 'self-deception', or 'interpersonal deception'. Background Self-deception is a process of denying or rationalizing away the relevance, significance, or importance of opposing evidence and logical argument. Self-deception involves convincing oneself of a truth (or lack of truth) so that one does not reveal any ...


2

Although I cannot answer the question on lying, (self-)speech and thinking are intimately linked to each-other, and actually used in UX-design (e.g. Krahmer, 2004). He compared two different approaches of thinking-aloud. In other words, people are perfectly able to verbalize their thoughts and actually do so. One of the approaches he compares is a proposal ...


2

If you want to estimate/classify using implicit measures, whether a user is being deceptive while filling out an online questionnaire ... then methods such as EEG are not suitable. Recording EEG data takes a lot of preparation and at least one experimenter to prepare the "user" (in your case the person filling out the questionnaire). And if you are talking ...


1

It has been shown that even if you tell a patient this pill is placebo and it's not going to help you, there's still some positive effect. It's all about perception. There was a really good TED talk with the topic "Is there scientific proof we can heal ourselves?" at TEDxAmericanRiviera presented by Lissa Rankin, MD.


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It is my belief that liars inclined to lie to them selves. Freudian psychology can illustrate this point through the concept of the ego-sensor. Liars can be compelled to lie to themselves in order to protect the ego. Thereby, preserving their sense of identity. This usually occurs in the form of denial, detachment, or reattribution. I do not believe that ...


1

Here is a work about IPIP 50 in New Zeeland but there are also some references to USA findings: http://www.psychology.org.nz/cms_show_download.php?id=617


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