11

The first thing to note is that the study was not published as a peer-reviewed journal article. It was published as a blog post. Thus, it has not gone through a peer review process. While the reader can function as the reviewer, the article does not follow the structure of a journal article. As such, there is an inadequate description of the method in the ...


9

Cross-race effect in facial processing As @analystic has noted, there is substantial research documenting what is sometimes called the "cross-race effect": Cross-race effect (sometimes called cross-race bias, other-race bias or own-race bias) is the tendency for people of one race to have difficulty recognizing and processing faces and facial ...


8

There are many reasons why men may find 'not-entirely-natural' women more attractive. One reason, perhaps obvious, is simply based on evolutionary preferences. A rosy complexion may indicate good health, whereas larger breasts may signify fertility. Whether fake or not, women use makeup and surgery to accentuate features that men already find attractive. ...


7

Hofstede has developed a cultural dimensions theory to compare countries, which uses factor analysis to assign values across 6 dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: Power Distance Index Individualism vs Collectivism Masculinity vs Femininity Uncertainty Avoidance Index Long Term Orientation vs Short Term Orientation Indulgence vs Restraint That's ...


6

At one time Mauritanians considered fat women more attractive than thin. Unless Mauritanian men were born different to other men, surely we have to suppose that Mauritanian men were trained that way. Sources: BBC News: Mauritania's 'wife-fattening' farm , and Wikipedia: Body mass in attractivness


6

Culture reference effects Heine et al (2002) discuss how people in different cultures often answer questions relative to a reference group in their own culture. Thus, for example, if a culture is more collectivistic in general, measured cultural differences may less when people within a culture answer test items relative to their own cultural reference ...


5

Long story short: at least in facial affect perception/expression, there is not a definitive answer to this. The field is only just beginning to get a handle on the fact that what have been long thought of as "universal" expressions of emotion don't seem to be, so there is considerably less work on how exactly culture affects these expressions. However, ...


5

This is probably an example of the "cross-race effect", in which people of one ethnic group (you're talking ethnicity, not culture here) have trouble distinguishing between members of another ethnic group. It comes down to familiarity basically - if we are more familiar with the features of a white face (for example) then we'll be able to notice minor ...


5

There is a 2009 article by Burger that reportedly reviews the Milgram experiment and all known replications. You might want to read through the replications carefully to see whether any such studies were performed in an eastern cultural context. Possibly even a close reading of the studies might suggest how much results vary across settings. I found one ...


5

While I don't know of the Milgram studies being replicated cross cultural there's an older, less severe conformity study by Asch. Those use less authoritarian and more group conformity pressure. Eastern cultures showed higher conformity and western showed falling conformity over time. Bond, R. & Smith, Peter. (1996). Culture and conformity: A meta-...


5

That is a really interesting question. There are some studies that found that the emotional response is strong in one's native language compared to languages that are acquired later. For instance, a study by Harris and colleagues found that physiological arousal was stronger to swear words or childhood reprimands in the first language of the participants ...


5

I think the description provided (if accurate) should be enough to find the paper, unless it is not available online, or is only available in a different language. Sometimes authors of books and certain review papers will reference unpublished research, so it may have come up in that context. Or it may not exist at all. The results described are in line ...


4

Reminds me a bit of existential therapy and humanistic psychology in general. Unconditional positive regard and motivational interviewing both insist on approaching undesirable feelings from the client's perspective without imposing fixes or changes on the person through pressure or blunt confrontationality. Existential theory even presumes major, inevitable ...


4

Both of my parents and I are multilingual. We come from Czech Republic and have learned multiple languages through our lives as we moved around. I have noticed, even within myself that I "feel" different speaking a European language compared to English. Not being able to go into the neurobiology of brain plasticity and change within when developing with ...


3

This is a classic example of the analytic vs holistic perceptual systems, one of the cornerstone theories on cross-cultural cognition. For a good overview of this see Perceiving an Object and Its Context in Different Cultures by Kitayama et al. (2003) or you can start with the seminal piece Culture and the self by Markus & Kitayama (1991). Essentially, ...


3

I have a little difficulty understanding your question. are you asking why do we percieve slightly different behaviors as culturally different? I would say that for me cultural difference is a continuum or degree rather than difference. For example, as you wrote, prolonged eye contact is rude everywhere, but how much is acceptable might be different. Also ...


3

I am sharing my research here should anybody find it useful. ========================================================================= Although PHQ-9 wasn’t developed for an Indian audience, it has been used by multiple studies in India [1, 2, 3]. It has also been validated for an adolescent population, and a score of was found to have high sensitivity (87....


3

While I can't, and won't make any comment on the accusations of racism (I think the comments below your question answer that quite well), the Western/Analytic vs. Eastern/Holistic dichotomy is pretty well established and supported by studies in cognitive and social psychological literatures. This may be a little different to what you had in mind, as your ...


3

Short answer According to a study dating 6 years back, the incidence rate of anorexia nervosa was stable over several decades. Background According to a review paper published in 2012, the overall incidence rate of eating disorders, including anorexia, was stable over the previous decades. However, there was an increase found in the high risk-group of 15–...


2

It sounds like you're describing cultural differences in the fundamental attribution error, which, according to Wikipedia, is: People's tendency to place an undue emphasis on internal characteristics to explain someone else's behavior in a given situation, rather than considering external factors. It does not explain interpretations of one's own behavior, ...


2

A bit of a broad question as a full answer will really depend on the specifics of the problem being addressed. In short though, yes, cultural factors, and probably to some extent linguistic factors as well, do impact on problem solving processes. One of the main cross-cultural factors that can alter problem solving is the whole individualism/collectivism ...


2

It is said that American society up to around 1950 came in three flavors, vanilla, chocolate and strawberry. That America was intolerant of interracial marriage, which was against the law in many states. An ice-cream metaphor for modern American society is Baskin-Robbins' 31 flavors. That society puts a premium on "diversity," including in dating and ...


1

First off - this question is really broad and its scope could probably fill libraries. I will therefore limit the answer to generalized pointers in answer to your three sub questions. Is there any place online where I can conduct an interview with Japanese people who reside in Japan and are familiar with their own culture. Culture is a difficult concept. ...


1

There are many reasons why people want to have children : Some want to have children because they hope it can save their declining marriage / relationship Some want to have children because they feel instinctively driven towards it Some want to have children because they feel they're supposed to Some want to have children because they feel they're missing "...


1

The article by Gudmundsson (2009) looks very useful. It describes an eight step process for translating and adaptive psychological instruments. The article is written clearly with concrete suggestions and references to the broader literature. selecting an instrument for translation selecting qualified translators selecting qualified experts ...


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