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I think you are referring to the Dunning-Kruger Effect. It describes the relationship between experience one has in a particular topic and his/her confidence about being an expert. Dunning and Kruger argue that when people know nothing, they also know that they know nothing. However, after learning only a little bit, people seem to be very confident that ...


4

Another theory/study by Leonid Rozenblit and Frank Keil, is the illusion of explanatory depth. This powerful but inaccurate feeling of knowing is what Leonid Rozenblit and Frank Keil in 2002 termed, the illusion of explanatory depth (IOED), stating, “Most people feel they understand the world with far greater detail, coherence, and depth than they ...


4

Studies show that the overestimation of one's intelligence is both gender and culture/country dependent. I don't know of any studies which tried to relate the over/under-estimation of one's intelligence (in measurable terms, rather than generic statements like "I'm stupid") to depression. There is one recent (2017) study in older adults that found a self-...


3

Note: There are different kinds of confidence ratings (eg, confidence in skill or ability, confidence in knowledge or expertise, etc). This answer only addresses the question as asked, regarding confidence in memory or familiarity. Processing fluency - sometimes referred to as "cognitive fluency", "cognitive ease", or just "fluency" - is a mechanism ...


3

I think what you are reffering to is known as self-efficacy. Perceived self-efficacy is defined as people's beliefs about their capabilities to produce designated levels of performance that exercise influence over events that affect their lives. Self-efficacy beliefs determine how people feel, think, motivate themselves and behave. ... A strong sense of ...


3

Quick answer: A brief Google search show cases where this occurred. For example, it seems that a study on medical students showed a significant relationship between confidence and ability after training, although not before training (Clanton et al., 2014). This being said, the Dunning-Kruger effect always comes to mind when such questions come up… ...


2

Short answer The cartoon graphics showing mount stupid seem to be exaggerated, popular-scientific representations, and should, as far as I can see, be regarded as schematics to illustrate a more subtle effect. Background From what I can find, the cartoons you provide are exaggerated and simplified versions depicting the more pronounced examples of the ...


2

First, a major caveat: a less-than-30-second video clip of Monk in a particularly stressful context is insufficient basis for trait judgments, according to trait theory, which defines traits "as habitual patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion. According to this perspective, traits are relatively stable over time" (Kassin, 2003). Since this clip doesn't ...


1

If the question is 'Will it start to rain based on this cloud cover?' and the answer is a binary 'yes' or 'no' and the subsequent question is 'How sure are you about that?', then the answer to your question Does the confidence rating reflect their estimate of likelihood of rain, or rather the likelihood that the choice is correct? is the latter: it ...


1

You would need to seek the professional advice of someone in the legal profession for this but as far as I am aware there are no provisions releasing anyone from legal duties under mandatory reporting requirements.


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