6

As far as I know REM is just brain running a simulation During sleep hormones and neurotransmitters shift in their quantities available along the phases of sleep: slow wave sleep, intermediate stages and REM ( this happens several times during a typical sleeping session) and each phase brings corresponding highs and lows of the aforementioned chemicals. ...


6

The question: I'm wondering where the original person's "consciousness" would "transfer" Presupposes a Cartesian Ego; or the idea that consciousness is something separate, ethereal, and indivisible. I recommend reading some Daniel Dennett and Derek Parfit to cure yourself of this common assumption; a good philosophical starting point is Parfit's "Reasons ...


5

There is little evidence that stress affects structural MRI (reduction in the volume of the hippocampus). The review article (Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behaviour and cognition Lupien et al., 2009) synthesizes the current knowledge in the field. Another article might be of interest (MRI measurement of hippocampal volume in post-...


5

The presentation of flickering lights usually leads to so-called steady-state visual evoked potentials, that is, oscillatory responses in the visual cortex with the frequency of the stimulus as well as its harmonics. See for example: Herrmann CS. (2001) Human EEG responses to 1-100 Hz flicker: resonance phenomena in visual cortex and their potential ...


3

yes, here is a nice paper which shows evidence : http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/131017/srep02972/full/srep02972.html from the paper : " a report commissioned by the National Football League (NFL), showed that retired players between the ages of 30–49 were 20 times more likely, at a rate of 1.9%, to receive a diagnosis of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), ...


3

Perhaps a more useful way of looking at these concepts is to consider anima in terms of the hindbrain, which takes sensory inputs from both the body and external stimuli and creates a virtual model strongly colored by memories ( with associated feelings) and our conditioning. This model is then "presented" to the forebrain as images + feelings. Animus could ...


2

Loss of consciousness is usually caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain - in the case of injury it could be directly cause by the injury or it may be because they are shocked or scared - this is called vasovagal syncope. Basically, severe emotional stress leads to a burst of activity in particular nerves that lead to reduced heart rate and dilation of ...


2

It is reported that mild traumatic brain injury does not produce Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder however, according to this report in the American Journal of Psychiatry, severe TBI could possibly lead to PTSD in approximately 27% of cases. In this study of 96 patients (77 men and 19 women), after 6 months following hospital discharge for severe traumatic ...


2

This was used to prove that all parts of brain utilize same general mechanism. This is not quite true. While a good deal of reorganization can happen post-damage, brain function will not be re-localized to anywhere. Instead, what often happens is that, if a location on one hemisphere is damaged, the function is taken over by the corresponding location on ...


1

There is a powerful theoretical consideration that a loss of consciousness is an internal protective mechanism. Because the loss of consciousness is a significant threat in a hostile external environment, it is only when the nervous system itself is severely threatened internally that consciousness becomes compromised. Further, loss of consciousness can ...


1

I've asked this question about dominance of brain hemispheres. in the question there are examples of drawings made by split brain patients using only one hand and eye at a time. I don't know if using both eyes while drawing produces different results, but the images suggest that the ability to process memory of objects is impaired:


1

Basically the same as a normal two-halved brain. Circumstances in which function is altered are fairly limited. For details, see case reports on Wikipedia's split-brain page, and this episode of Scientific American Frontiers that features Mike Gazzaniga's research, as mentioned here. Gazzaniga's research was reviewed in a Nature news feature (Wolman, 2012), ...


1

You say you are "aware that all tasks that a person undertakes involve both halves of the brain". Then, On what kind of patients would this hypothetical test be suitable as healthy people use both hemisphere and split brain use just one hemisphere depending on the drawing hand ? If you refer to healthy patients I don't think such a test is possible. For ...


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