8

It's called the Halo Effect: The halo effect is a ... cognitive bias, where a person making an initial assessment of another person, place, or thing will assume ambiguous information based upon concrete information. The term halo effect is used in marketing to explain customer bias toward certain products because of favorable experience with ...


5

Not sure what you describe is a cognitive bias in itself, but I suspect the scarcity heuristic may be part of the purchaser's rationalization. (See the wikipedia article for academic references.)


5

I am not entirely sure about the proper scientific names but I think your issue revolves around buying things because they are cheap; hard to find. The first is a notorious reason to buy stuff; the impulsive purchase of goods, simply because they are advertised as 'buy two, pay for one!'. This bargain hunting can indeed become pathological and addictive (...


4

Because we still don't know exactly how the brain works. That's why we do research. If these authors knew the answer ahead of time, neither of them would have done the study. These are research papers, they are showing findings that are consistent with different models. Maybe the real model is somewhere in between, maybe there are context-dependencies, ...


3

This is an interesting question as it has been of the opinion of many people around me that people who drive certain cars or are in a particular job or social status are selfish and don't care about anyone but themselves and maybe a little about those in their own circle of people. But is this true? TLDR - It seems to be true from studies presented, ...


3

In general, personality traits correlate with most measures of satisfaction. Most notably, there is a large literature showing that personality correlates with life satisfaction (see Steel et al). In general, neuroticism is the biggest correlate followed by extraversion and conscientiousness. The following table from Grant et al summarises two major meta-...


3

I am not sure I understand the refill example, and I do not have any empirical study in mind, but here is a classical fictitious example drawn from Mas-Collel, Winsthon and Green, Microeconomics, which might be relevant to your question. The example is slightly far-fetched but I think it's good to get the idea. Suppose you want to choose a color to paint ...


3

Ethical procedures are specific to your country and even differ between universities and sometimes even per department. Of course you know everything about the Declaration of Helsinki, being immersed in the city of its origins (you seem to (have) be(en) affiliated to the University of Helsinki). You seem to be located in NY now, but I'm unsure to your ...


2

In simple terms, demand for toilet paper increased and supply was unable to scale up. The supply chain for toilet paper is unable to rapidly scale up production to the levels required to meet the large increase in demand. Most supermarkets (at least where I live) seem to be unwilling to increase the prices of toilet paper in order for supply and demand to ...


2

What you are looking for is usually considered within synesthesia, specifically auditory-visual synesthesia. Usually these topics are developed in "commercial or industrial psychology" in a general way and more specifically by psychologists incorporated in marketing, these last studies are often not published, are made for the best initial orientation of ...


2

You certainly did not understand it correctly, because the statement that the second case is either rational or not cannot be stated based only on the information you provided. The rationality of the second statement depends on the specific decision-maker's attitude to risk only. It is not possible to infer it based only on the information you are providing....


2

The behaviour of agents can be predicted from utility or value based decision analysis models. Basically, you can model how the agent decides based on multiple objectives (or goals) by means of a multicriteria decision model. A simple multicriteria model consists in the weighted aggregation of value (utility) functions. Value (utility) functions represent ...


2

How to integrate realistic cognitive models of human behaviour and ecomonic models is an open research question, however to tackle it, it might be helpful to break it into a few more easily answerable sub-questions: What models of human planning with emotional influence exist? There are a number of models in existence that try to capture emotion and ...


2

This should be rather easy to find on google scholar, especially with the recent replicability crisis in social psychology. In particular, Bargh and Cesario has a few things to say in 'defense' of priming. You can start with Bargh's article, which is a response to this article by Bower. Cesario's article is here, and for an overview of the whole issue ...


1

Confirmation bias is the tendency to search for, interpret, favour, and recall information in a way that confirms pre-existing beliefs or hypotheses (WikiPedia; Plous, 1993) The affect heuristic is a mental shortcut that allows people to make decisions, and solve problems quickly and efficiently, in which current emotion - fear, pleasure, surprise, etc. - ...


1

CBM is not so much a theoretical framework but rather a label attached to a collection of methods and biases. In a way, this reflects the state of research on heuristics and biases, at least in behavioral economics. As many famed findings in the field have come from attempts to "disprove" traditional economic theory, the resulting effects (biases) have often ...


1

A few options. You could start with an open ended question and then move to closed ended questions for leading brands and perhaps any other options listed in the previously open ended process. You could use an input box that takes text and shows partial matches which people then select (e.g., a bit like in Facebook when selecting a friend)


1

it seems that you can use randomization of options to decrease bias. That is, present every respondent with multiple choices but in completely random order. Also, bias might be directly tested on two groups, say A&B. Only difference will be the order of available answers. This manual seems to be very helpful: Handbook of Survey Research, Ch.9 Question ...


1

I asked the same question in the private beta of the newly open Economics.SE and got some interesting answers. You can check them out at https://economics.stackexchange.com/questions/95/experiments-contradicting-the-expected-utility-model


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible