9

No, these are not examples of intuition, but examples of procedural memory (or automaticity). Procedural memory is the ability to perform certain tasks without conscious awareness.


8

What you describe is the textbook definition of a habit: routines of behavior that are repeated regularly and tend to occur subconsciously. These are triggered by some external (say, being behind the driver's well of a car) or internal (say, being upset) stimuli. This activates chunks of procedural memory, which attempts to carry out a task that was usually ...


7

If you are searching specific part of the brain, I think that frontal regions of cortex will be an answer(In particular, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex which was associated with self-focused metacognitive evaluation). But, as it common in real life, becoming aware of dreaming state required coordinated work of different parts of brain. You can read this ...


6

A more computational explanation can be found in the expectation-based reasoning literature. The theory suggests that people are always generating expectations of what they expect to sense (see/hear/smell/feel etc) in the near future. These expectations are matched against observations. If expectations and observations match, then all is good. When they don'...


5

This phenomenon is called highway hypnosis (also called driving without attention mode or white line fever) and is an example of procedural memory (or automaticity). Procedural memory is the ability to perform certain tasks without conscious awareness.


4

There is nothing surprising or unusual in this. It is a straightforward application of skilled learning (the driving or whatever), habit formation (route following), and having your conscious attention on something else. Back in the 1990s, when I was doing landscaping, I used to make good use of this effect by consciously reviewing things I had recently ...


4

I'm lucky enough to know a counselor-in-training whose preferred modality is CBT; here's what she suggested. Identifying those core beliefs is indeed the important part. Useful tools include the CBT Thought Record worksheet, which pretty well explains itself, and the downward arrow technique illustrated in this figure: (Trader, 2011). One less-than-self-...


3

SHORT ANSWER: There is no evidence that adopting personal routines leads to cognitive decline in the way that you have described in your post. There is some evidence that a propensity against personal routine can be representative of underlying creative potential. Given that creativity is highly linked to openness to experience on the Big 5 measure of ...


3

There may not be one: it is impossible to conclude with confidence that personality disorders are, or are not, mental illnesses; there are ambiguities in the definitions and basic information about personality disorders is lacking. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11823318/ Mental illness in general isn’t about mood, either. Mood only covers mood ...


3

Probably just a part of the story, but the locus coeruleus is known to be implied in the wake-sleep cycle. Furthermore, an experiment on cats demonstrated that removing this structure cause actual (but nonsensical) behaviors replacing normal REM sleep phases: cats have no more REM sleep and instead hunt non-existing rats (or something else who knows). http:...


2

Unless the advertisement is actually advertising the person's attractiveness directly, this should be a peripheral issue. Consider Wikipedia's description of the central route: Central-route processes involve scrutiny of persuasive communication (e.g., a speech or an advertisement) to determine the arguments' merits. Under these conditions, a person's ...


2

You claim that "mental illness in general is more about mood". No, technically speaking, mental illness is an umbrella term, which also encompasses mood disorders. The very quote you used to base that conclusion on says Mental illness, also called mental health disorders, refers to a wide range of mental health conditions — disorders that affect your ...


2

Ooker, the distinction between personality disorders and acute mental illness is evolving. Personality disorders are no longer thought to be permanent and resistant to change, BPD or borderline personality disorder responds well to DBT (dialectical behavioral therapy). DSM 5 has moved away from diagnosing the disorders but more about the functional analysis ...


1

The basic answer is that it depends on: training protocol (duration, frequency) modality (hearing, seeing, memorizing, attention, etc) individual variance (observable changes varies between individuals - some may not respond to the training) So it has to be determined individually for each task (not enough information provided in the original question). In ...


1

What do you mean exactly with 'processes'? If you're thinking about actual movements made during editing (i.e. tiping), this science paper might help. Very simply put, they showed skilled typist have two kinds of control processes, one conscious and one unconscious. (Science 29 October 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6004 pp. 683-686 DOI: 10.1126/science.1190483)


1

The key method to induce lucid dreams (and I speak of personal experience here) is to train yourself to regularly doubt the "realness" of your environment. F.x. by occasionally just stopping what you are doing and wondering about what makes you so sure that this is not a dream actually ... This new habit also becomes part of your dream self (personally I ...


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