6

The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


6

The F ratio statistic has a numerator and denominator degrees of freedom. Thus, you report: F (numerator_df, denominator_df) = F_value, p = ..., effect size = ... The numerator degrees of freedom relates to the factor of interest; the denominator degrees of freedom corresponds to the degrees of freedom for the error variance. The exact way that these ...


5

The numbers inside the parentheses are the degrees of freedom for the F-statistic. The second number is the within-group degrees of freedom. When you have the same number of subjects in all conditions, then the second number will be the number of subjects - the number of cells (conditions) in your design.


5

In APA style, when you cite a work, you add an in-text citation in the body of the work and you add the full reference to the reference list at the end of the work. End of text references for book chapters, journal articles, and similar works include the page range of the work in the reference. This refers to the start and end page of the cited work (and ...


4

The distinction between experiment and quasi-experiment is often made in undergraduate psychology courses. In general, the term quasi-experiment is used to identify studies that fall short of a controlled experiment in some respect: e.g., pre-existing groups; allocation of participants to groups in a non-random way. In some cases, repeated measures ...


4

You should get the APA Style Manual (currently in the 6th edition). Chapter 5 describes the effective use of graphic elements in text. It provides readers with guidance on which graphic element is best suited to the data being delivered as well as detailed instruction on table and figure preparation. It has lots of examples of how to report individual ...


4

Page numbers aren't required in APA style because in a typical journal article a citation doesn't refer to a specific part of the work being cited. For example, if I make the claim that dogs are better than cats then I might reference an experiment that tested this claim. I'm not referring to any specific passage in the journal article, I'm referring to the ...


3

APA style is mostly designed for defining manuscript submission rules for journal articles. When you seek to apply these rules to a thesis or book, you inevitably have to apply your own rules. The general principle is that in-text citations should unambiguously identify an end of text reference. Thus, whatever principle you adopt should do this. For a ...


3

As an update, this paper may be helpful, though it comes from the medical field. References Monsalves, M.J., Bangdiwala, A.S., Thabane, A. et al. LEVEL (Logical Explanations & Visualizations of Estimates in Linear mixed models): recommendations for reporting multilevel data and analyses. BMC Med Res Methodol 20, 3 (2020).


2

There are some informative examples in Baayen, Davidson and Bates (2008), though some of their advice is outdated, having been supplanted by Barr et al. (2013) cited in the answer above. I found it useful to read these two papers together, though. I'd like to add my voice to @Christian in stressing that one common gap in reporting such models is which random ...


1

Yes, page numbers should generally be included. (As Josh notes in his answer, periodical articles need only cite the pages of the article as a whole, rather than the specific claim.) The spirit of a citation is to allow the reader to quickly and conveniently locate what you're citing, and especially citations of extensive books can be difficult to pin down ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible