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7

I am experienced presenter, my job is to show presentation, organize educations and trainings to different people, with different personality traits in different situation. Until now I collected more the 700 hours of presentation and more then 120 hours of presentation education. In the beginning I had also that problem, but I overcome it by exercise. Now I ...


6

There has been some preliminary research in the 1960's. From "The neurobiology of psychedelic drugs: implications for the treatment of mood disorders" by Vollenweider and Kometer: Psycholytic therapy was introduced by Ronald Sandison and applied in Europe at 18 treatment centres. In psycholytic therapy, low to moderate doses of LSD (50–100 μg), ...


5

It's pretty difficult to imagine a person with Social Anxiety Disorder being an extrovert. The symptoms of SAD include [1]: Intense fear of interacting with strangers and of being judged Worrying about embarrassing or humiliating yourself or that others think that you look anxious Anxiety that disrupts your daily routine, work, school or other ...


5

Different diagnostic systems may assign these syndromes to different categories based on theory or clinical opinion. In the DSM-IV era, OCD was listed under the "Anxiety disorders" category; however, in the DSM-5, it is now listed under a different "Obsessive-Compulsive and related disorders" category. ADHD is currently under the "Neurodevelopmental ...


5

ADHD is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder. Neurodevelopmental disorders are impairments of the growth and development of the brain or central nervous system. A narrower use of the term refers to a disorder of brain function that affects emotion, learning ability, self-control and memory and that unfolds as the individual grows. You are correct in ...


5

Cannabis can cause an acute and short-lasting episode of anxiety, which often resembles a state of panic. When taken in high doses these effects can be intense and turn into attacks of panic and phobia. About 20–30% of users show brief acute anxiety reactions after smoking the drug. These symptoms tend to occur more in drug-naive subjects and in novel or ...


5

I don't think you can rule out that she really is suffering from headaches and dizziness. Just because the doctors can't find a physiological cause doesn't mean that there isn't one.


5

The terminology in this area can be a source of confusion because sensitization is not usually meant as the opposite of desensitization but of habituation. E.g., Blumstein (2016) People have written about habituation, a process that leads to decreased responsiveness to a stimulus, as well as its counterpart, sensitization, or an increased responsiveness ...


5

I have not been able to find any term, medical or non-medical, which includes the word asynchronous, but to add to the answer by @user20460 there is the non-medical term hobbies. Taking part in hobbies and other interests is recommended to anyone who suffers from anxiety and/or depression because not only can it provide a distraction, but it can also ...


4

Here's the only speculation I could find about brain shivers aka brain zaps. Cortes JA, Radhakrishnan R. A Case of Amelioration of Venlafaxine-Discontinuation “Brain Shivers” With Atomoxetine The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders. 2013;15(2):PCC.12l01427. doi:10.4088/PCC.12l01427. It proposes an explanation related to norepinephrine. Also, it claims ...


4

Yes, that is the consensus view among psychiatrists and clinical psychologists (e.g., Parker et al., 2012). A commonly referenced authoritative guideline for treatment of major depressive disorder is the NICE guide. Reference Parker et al., Acta Psychiatr Scand (2013); 128(4): 271-81


4

Reminds me a bit of existential therapy and humanistic psychology in general. Unconditional positive regard and motivational interviewing both insist on approaching undesirable feelings from the client's perspective without imposing fixes or changes on the person through pressure or blunt confrontationality. Existential theory even presumes major, inevitable ...


4

Not entirely sure what specific stats you'd be interested in, but Wikipedia has plenty on prevalences of specific mental disorders. For anxiety disorders, which include obsessive compulsive disorder: A review that pooled surveys in different countries up to 2004 found overall average prevalence estimates for any anxiety disorder of 10.6% (in the 12 months ...


4

Short answer Yes, they are actually similar, and they can be thought as two extremes of the same continuum. Many studies (here's a review by Lang and McTeague)suggest that the psychophysiological reactivity in the anxiety spectrum disorder is threat-related. Long Answer Ohman (2009) noted how predator-prey relationship is asymmetrical because there’s a ...


4

Short Answer The Brief Anxiety Scale is one of many Pychometric Rating Scales (Tyrer, et al. 1984) used to assess necessary Routine Outcome Measures (BACP, 2016; Harmon et al., 2007; Lambert and Shimokawa, 2011; Simon et al., 2012). The scale which is recommended for your research will depend on your reseach requirements. Some scales are quick to complete ...


4

With "normal" risk taking related to "thrill seekers" what you could be talking about can be Sensation Seeking (Zuckerman, 2007) Risky behavior can be an expression of a normal, genetically influenced personality trait, sensation seeking. Its expression in risky behaviors such as extreme and risky sports, vocations, substance abuse, unsafe sex, and crime,...


4

As with many mental health concerns, the situation for each individual is unique and therefore what we do and how we deal with the concern is also unique. Nothing said in this answer is a hard and fast rule, but are loose guidelines, for more information please check out these helpful links (thanks to @ChrisRogers): ASIST Suicide Intervention, for Canadian ...


3

What is Anxiety? Give this a read. I like this explanation of anxiety best, however: A feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease, typically about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome. What is Stress? Give this a read also. For an explanation of stress as it pertains to your question, I like this best: A state of mental or emotional ...


3

Not quite the same, although there is some overlap. What's colloquially known as an "adrenaline rush" (e.g. what you'd experience in a roller coaster or more generally in a fight-or-flight situation) is the result of the body's fast reaction system to stress, sometimes called the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis. SAM activation causes the adrenal ...


3

The first line treatment for stuttering (I'm a stutterer myself) is speech therapy. Such therapies generally focus on helping stutterers to learn ways to minimize stuttering when they speak, such as by speaking more slowly, regulating their breathing, or gradually progressing from single-syllable responses to longer words and more complex sentences. Most of ...


3

Based on the scenario you mentioned, it resembles more as Learned Helplessness or Self-Fulfilling prophecy than negative reinforcement. Learned Helplessness,is a belief that an individual could not make a change to the outcome after being exposed to the aversive stimuli for a number of times (Seligman, 1972).To the point where he/she stop attempting to ...


3

Sociopaths (people with Antisocial Personality Disorder) report lower levels of anxiety and stress than the general population. Psychopathic traits tend to foster resiliency and are protective against anxiety. I'm a board-certified psychiatrist. There is ample evidence in the literature (and basic psych textbooks) that sociopathy have low levels of harm ...


2

When speaker lacks confidence about the full-scope of what they present, they stuff in as much as can be spoken to ensure they've covered any 'possible loose ends'. Lack-of-Confidence ensures the speaker will never have enough, and will jam in more. A confident speaker understands the core of their topic. They can speak it in 1 sentence (or 5). Thus, ...


2

Frankly, I don't see how the meta-analysis of 70-something non-randomized studies from the self-accepted answer is such amazing evidence. On the other hand, there's a 2008 meta-analysis of just the randomized (and double-blind) studies (RCTs), and these are not so few either: We included studies that randomly assigned adult patients meeting DSM-III-R or ...


2

Being a layman, you can only give advice to the students. When their test anxiety is serious, the best advice you can give them is - seek professional help. There are, as you say, numerous ways to relieve 'normal' anxiety. A good web source is WebMD, that gives the following tips, which may aid your students too: Learn your students to study efficiently; ...


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