Questions tagged [sensation]

Questions about the ways that our bodies processes incoming visual, auditory, gustatory, somatosensory, proprioceptive, and pain (among others) information

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49 views

How is a “mapped” touch sensation felt in the affected location?

The post, "How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?" explains how the nerves end up in a body map in the primary somatosensory cortex, and that: Peripheral sensory ...
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Is it right that the other name of observation is behavioral archeology?

Observation : From Wikipedia: Observation is the active acquisition of information from a primary source. In living beings, observation employs the senses. In science, observation can also involve ...
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Is our sense of smell heightened when we are asleep?

My question is whether our sense of smell is stronger when we sleep? From an evolutionary perspective this could have been beneficial in terms of runaway camp fires, marauding saber tooth tigers or ...
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Reason for experiencing electric current flowing through body during sleep from top to bottom [closed]

I know about sleep paralysis and there is several information about it, available over literature. Sleep paralysis is a temporary inability to move or speak that occurs when you're waking up or ...
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Can thought processes be sensed to happen exactly in the head?

It's common knowledge that humans think with their brains. So it's common to associate hard thinking with head and to seemingly "feel" that it's the head which is loaded when one's thinking. But does ...
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What is a sensorimotor connection in plain English?

I have googled, but haven't found any definition simple enough that I understand. I would appreciate it if you could give me an example as well! Thanks, Jack
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Is “haptodysphoria” an urban legend or is there another term under which this studied?

I was googling for something like why some people don't like to touch velvet, and the top hit was https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/haptodysphoria where it's defined as An odd, disagreeable sensation ...
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Are there any psychological studies of thirst following food that account for SFO-Nos1 activity?

Some studies up to 2015 surprising found that salty vs. non-salty food doesn't make much difference to thirst. E.g. a 2015 study found that: However, according to Prof. Leshem, despite our gut ...
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227 views

I have developed a self-regulation system that allows change at the physiological level. Does it have any merit?

Please note: I do not hold a degree. This system is based on experience and self-testing. I developed a self-regulation system that allows for the manipulation of sensations where they occur in the ...
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Are there any cases of a person with misophonia for which the condition has been passed on to their child?

genetics increase one's risk of PTSD, as well PTSD can be developed through vicarious trauma. Misophonia condition appears to have the following in common with PTSD; Anger , muscle tension, feeling ...
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What is the “static” in human vision called?

Sort of like a cheap digital Camera, the human eye has certain feedback that's perceived but doesn't actually exist in the real world; a little layer of Static that's especially noticeable in pitch ...
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Is there any neuroscience research on the emotion of feeling nothing?

When people entering anechoic chambers, logically there is a sensation of silence because relatively speaking, the sound levels are much lower compared to some normal baseline Likewise, when there is ...
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Is there an effect of visual expertise on eye movements when examining an image?

In the following linked image, you can see the eye movement traces of a subject examining a bust of Nefertiti (I came across this image while reading the following blog). When I was in grade school, ...
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Any ideas about the neural mechanism underlying the ASMR sensation?

Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is described as a pleasurable, tingly sensation in the (back of the) head. The sensation can be triggered by a vast variety of stimuli (auditory, visual, ...
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Why is sensory substitution not that successful?

By successful, I mean made it out to the large world market or being massively funded. After looking online it seems that the most relevant research is the one done by Bach-y-Rita about the seeing ...
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134 views

Is Paul's Churchland claim about qualia supported by science?

Knowledge argument: Mary is a brilliant scientist who is, for whatever reason, forced to investigate the world from a black and white room via a black and white television monitor. She specializes ...
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Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?

If we are to view pleasure and pain as being essentially synonymous with the more mechanistic concept of reward and punishment (i.e. as a part of learning and motivation system) then do we understand ...
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Is there a standard definition of a “hallucination”?

As far as I understand, there is a compelling sense of reality to sensory hallucinations. Do hallucinations (as, e.g. in the DSM) substitute for the sense and experience of a real reality? For ...
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161 views

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

The retinotopic, area-based connectivity patterns of the columnar receptive fields in the visual cortex are well-established. Do any mappings of the columnar receptive field connectivity patterns ...
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Does the retina contribute in distinguishing lines and borders?

I think there is a phenomenon behind the way which our eyes judge between lines of contrast, like black lines on a white page, by just recognizing the contrast areas at the level of the rods and cones....
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Is there a difference between physiological stimulations and psychological stimulations?

From what I understand, physiological stimulation (or stimulus or sensation) "refers to sensory excitation, the action of various agents or forms of energy (stimuli) on receptors that generate ...
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Difference between thoughts and sensations

I am interested to know how to distinguish sensations from thoughts, according to the techniques and concepts of neuroscience and psychology. Is there an explicit distinction between them, or are ...
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Does self-directed speech help or hurt a blind subject's auditory recognition?

Recently, it was found that self-directed speech was helpful to sighted subjects engaging in a visual search task: Participants searched for common objects, while being sometimes [sic] asked to ...
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If the color black reflects no light, how are we able to see it?

If color as we perceive it is dependent on the wave lengths that are reflected by an object, with white reflecting all hues and black absorbing all, how do we detect a black object? I do understand ...
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Difference between active and passive touch?

I am considering the role of whiskers in the development of the mouse brain, and came across the following: 'we found that the signals sent to the brain by the whiskers during active touch differ from ...
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165 views

What is the frequency range of electrotactile stimulation?

I have been trying to find out what the (human) electrotactile frequency range is. Since this is a much more experimental method (and more unpleasant) than the traditional vibrotactile method, the ...
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84 views

Synesthesia hearing to see

Can a synesthetic person, also known as a synaesthete, see sounds even when that person is actually blind? If so how does the brain interpret a picture without a vision?
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What is the cause of differences that are too small to see?

Consider two identical pieces of paper. Scenario 1: On both something is drawn in black ink. If the difference between the areas covered in black ink is sufficiently small, I cannot see the ...
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Does the perception of odors change over time?

Is it normal for the perception of odors to change over time? I mean the same odors, like the smell of a snack with the same formula as before.
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Is V1 involved in visual imagery?

It's well known that mental imagery shares the neural substrates of its respective modality, despite dissociable multivariate patterns. For example, visual imagery can be decoded across the ventral ...
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What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

I would like to know what the time scale is of the human ear. I mean, what is the shortest duration of a sound that a human ear can notice and what is the longest duration of a sound that a human ear ...
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Does the wrist have more neurons than the finger? [closed]

Once upon a time, I felt an ant crawling on my hand. I couldn't feel it initially, until it reached my wrist. Then I tried to let the ant crawl on my skin; what I found was that I couldn't feel the ...
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59 views

Does increased neural complexity slows down brain operation speeds?

If a sensory input is perceived, one needs to process this input from the sensory end organ (sensation) up to the brain (perception). Does a more more complex neural network consume more time than a ...
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862 views

Is it possible that people perceive time differently than others do?

All of my life I have been told to be more patient, to stop "racing through life", etc. Happily, I am finally mature enough to accept that as solid advice, but I am curious as to whether it is ...
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What explains the characteristics of the receptive fields of simple cells in V1?

Here is a YouTube video of a Hubel & Wiesel experiment from 1965 in the visual cortex. The video shows the experimenters outlining the receptive field of a simple cell in the first part of the ...
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Do people with birth defects feel phantom limbs?

The phenomenon of phantom limbs in people who have lost arms or legs to amputation is pretty well-established. It makes a fair amount of sense. The "brain mapping" of the limb (and for that matter the ...
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Do we perceive contrast colour patterns easily because of adaptation?

I can understand that colours are just manipulation of our brain to light rays of different wavelength and energy. We perceive patterns better at higher contrast. Do we perceive patterns better at ...
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Increasing pitch perception of the same auditory stimuli

I was trying to work up a small clip of repeating beep sounds I recorded from a mobile game. This series of sounds, when played, gave an unmistakable perception of increasing pitch with every ...
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What causes the sensation of taste when Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) is absorbed through the skin?

The Wikipedia page for DMSO says: The perceived garlic taste upon skin contact with DMSO may be due to nonolfactory activation of TRPA1 receptors in trigeminal ganglia ...and references a PLOS1 ...
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592 views

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

How does our brain translate periheral sensations due to injuries into pain perceptions? As an in silico analogy - if a stimulus is applied to a sensor it can be transmitted to a microprocessor. The ...
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534 views

Does sensory deprivation affect cognitive abilities?

I am wondering if the loss of vision or hearing early in life (say, before the age of 14 years) affects cognitive abilities later in life? I would imagine that as a group, early-blind or early-deaf ...
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Difference in hemispheres when processing of somatosensory information

We know from many studies (see e.g. Taylor, 2009 for an empirical and experiential overview) that processing of information is massively heterogeneous with respect to hemisphere. How does this ...
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Why is the sound of fingernails on a chalkboard so intolerable?

I am curious as to what current research shows regarding why scraping noises such as fingernails on a chalkboard, a knife/fork scraping against a plate, metal grinding against metal or stone etc are ...
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How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Different areas of the inner ear (the cochlea) are sensitive to different acoustic frequencies. Hence, the cochlea basically performs a fast Fourier transform on the audio signal. This spectral ...
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What regulates the strength of motor signals?

I've seen cognitive and robot models where the input signals from the sensors are directly used as the signal for outgoing motor control. This doesn't make much sense, because obviously we're able ...
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503 views

Is touch sensitivity higher for females?

I read a long time ago that in a study of two-week old infants response to touch, the female babies were far and away more sensitive. In most gender comparisons, there are the familiar "two humps" in ...
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How long does it take to learn to cane travel?

How long does it take the average person (either sighted or blind) to learn to use the guide cane successfully for mobility purposes? Source: Lions. Because required training times will depend on ...
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What stimulus features determine the psychophysical power law exponent?

Following the work of Stanley Stevens, psychophysical functions of stimulus intensity are commonly assumed to follow power laws, as illustrated below: This appears to be true for a wide variety of ...
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Can people with absolute pitch identify the exact frequency, or simply the pitch class?

Absolute pitch can be defined as the ability to identify or re-create a given musical note without the benefit of a reference tone. When people claim to have absolute pitch, does this mean they have ...
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Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?

When speaking, I hear my own voice very differently from how others do and from what it really is. The sound differs in tone, pitch, volume, etc. For example, recordings of my singing or speaking in ...