Questions tagged [perception]

For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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Are there scientific works that analyze the perception of intelligence?

Are there scientific works that analyze the social and/or psychological perception of intelligence, including the perception of any non-human intelligence: animal intelligence or computer intelligence?...
Arseniy's user avatar
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Evolutionary explanation for the neural structures generating representations (visual subset) [duplicate]

From my interpretation of the descriptions of individuals with specific types of brain damage (see the example in the next paragraph), it seems that in some cases part of the movie of consciousness ...
Minsky's user avatar
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But does it mean that the brain projects back the light that it receives? [duplicate]

Brief description of the problem Of course, the brain does not project the light it receives backwards or outwards. However, my question is probably as silly as the title, so hopefully a silly title ...
Mah Neh's user avatar
1 vote
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What does it sound like, subjectively, when a shockwave bursts your eardrums?

A pressure pulse above 150 dB will burst the eardrums. I speculate that displacement of the membrane is far above normal range. I speculate that the initial displacement will get passed along to the ...
DrBunny's user avatar
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The "Linking" Trick

This is more of a persuasion/manipulation tactic I see mostly media outlets employ. Linking is the name I came up with to describe when something is intentionally associated with something else to ...
Jason Esposito's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Why equal probabilities sometimes seem different?

I was told that's more a psychology question than probability. If for example i throw a dice 4 times and get {3,5,2,1}, i would be less surprised compare to getting {1,1,1,1} even though every ...
E_1's user avatar
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The Power of Word Choice in Changing Perceptions

I am looking for any studies, research, or theories about how choosing particular words or descriptions can lead to perceptual changes and judgements. This would be like loaded or emotive language. ...
Jason Esposito's user avatar
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Do humans see rates of change of colour

On a computer, we measure colour numerically, as three values, say red, green, blue. While our eyes include detectors for red, green and blue (although these aren't exactly the same as the light ...
Thomas Anton's user avatar
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Is there a Mach band on a step edge or not?

Recently, I've been reading about the Mach band effect and there is a particular case which is confusing me a little bit, since people don't seem to agree on what actually should be perceived. It is ...
C. Almeida's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
152 views

What is the term for the inability to see past one's own current emotional state?

I'm looking for a specific latin or greek word that describes something like the inability to empathize with emotions that are not in line with one's current affective state. It could probably be ...
Lucubrator's user avatar
2 votes
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50 views

Is there any neurological research on schema theory?

I noticed schema theory is frequently mentioned in educational psychology and sociocultural topics but didn't find neurological research related to it. I wonder if there are some shared mechanisms ...
angushushu's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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How can sinusoid sound be perceived as having constant loudness?

To elaborate, given an audible, sinusoidal wave $A\sin(ft)$ with constant $A$ and $f$. That sounds constant to us. Now from a few posts linked below, I understand that as stereocilia of the hair cells ...
SmoothKen's user avatar
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Can brain improve "non-active" functions?

I'm from computer science background and this question struck me when learning about neural networks as they are initially filled with random values. Can brain improve "non-active" functions ...
tmvkrpxl0's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
767 views

How do hair cells recognize frequencies?

I read that "a neuron can fire up to 1000 all-or-none impulses/sec" 1. But the hair cells in our ears are trimmed to recognize frequencies up to 20 kHz. How can a hair cell detect a ...
Leon Schreiber's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
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Does the human eye have a muscle that if paralyzed would make us only see things that are in motion?

In "Kwantechizm", a relatively popular book written by a Polish physicist Andrzej Dragan, I read that chickens move their head so that they can see things that are not in motion, with the ...
d33tah's user avatar
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Less littering with less trashcans [closed]

I live in Stockholm and recently visited Helsinki. I've lived a few different places in Sweden and only been to Helsinki in Finland. A big difference i noticed right away was the way cleaner streets, ...
Tony's user avatar
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How is 'purple' both ligt at one wavelength and the sum of light at two different wavelengths?

I see purple, violet, magenta, etc. as very similar shades and don't understand why. Consulting color wavelength charts like we see that purple (or violet) is about 400 nm. Consulting color mixing ...
Toke Faurby's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
108 views

Is there a name for the gap between speaker's intention and listener's interpretation?

I apologise if this as been asked before, but I couldn't find anything online. Whenever there is an exchange of information from one person to another - such as if someone is speaking to someone else ...
Sam Forster's user avatar
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How many stories can the human brain discern? [closed]

Perhaps the question will seem strange and not clearly formulated, for which I apologize in advance. Are there estimates of how many stories the human mind can discern? For example, let each story be ...
Арман Гаспарян's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
338 views

What causes this motion illusion?

There are some questions here about various optical illusions. I stumbled upon this one and would like to find out where does it belong. Wikipedia has a page about illusory motion that mentions ...
მამუკა ჯიბლაძე's user avatar
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What causes the perception of time

I've recently watched veritasium video about time perception. And what i got out of that is that the more are brain is being used up the slower time goes and the less we use the faster it goes. Is ...
no name the astronaut's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Does human biology compute audio fast enough to benefit from phase accurate audio propagation in 3D space?

In nature when people perceive a point source of audio moving in 3D space say when I am stationary and listening to someone talking who is walking around me does my perception of that audio benefit ...
Scott Stensland's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
138 views

Are centre-surround antagonism and lateral inhibition synonyms?

On Wikipedia, there is one page for centre-surround antagonism and one for lateral inhibition. They both concern the activity of a neuron being reduced by stimuli present not in the center of its ...
David Cian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
176 views

Is Tinnitus caused by damage to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) or Auditory Cortex, which can be repaired?

It is well known that loud noises can lead to hearing problems such as temporary hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and even permanent hearing loss. But this is the first time scientists ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
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Mirrors/optics and physical adaptation of the eye

Is it possible to use a clever combination of lenses and mirrors placed between your eye and a screen 1m away from you to make the eye react to the screen as if it were 20m away from you? What I'm ...
abelian's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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The perception of time of workaholics

“When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.” -Albert Einstein It's no secret that Elon Musk puts a ...
Darshan P's user avatar
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What is the recommended way to deal with failed trials during an experiment run?

Imagine I run a psychophysical experiment. I have generated a sequence of trial conditions which are presented to each participant in same order. But not all of participants are equally good at ...
ivan866's user avatar
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Is there any average time span estimate for change in a "perception"? [closed]

This question is about a perception in general and not related to a specific perception. Suppose an individual has a perception (say X) on a particular phenomenon and later, the individual came to ...
hanugm's user avatar
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What count as an exposure?

From this answer (emboldenment is mine) : If you want to go with modern cognitive theories of motivation, then a good concept to explore would be PLOC (Perceived Locus of Causality), or how much you ...
Ooker's user avatar
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Analytic thinking of the western individual versus the holistic thinking of most people

I am reading a book called the righteous mind by the moral psychologist Jonathan Haidt, and in one of the chapters he discusses how the perception and thinking style of Westerners is different from ...
Ahmad Eldesokey's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
71 views

Does our conscious experience of world match the world as it IS or as it presents itself?

Steven Pinker in his book 'How the mind works' says: our conscious sensation of color and lightness matches the world as it is rather than the world as it presents itself to the eye. The snowball is ...
Gull Noor's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
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What is it called, when people lean forward in the real world while moving forward in a Virtual Environment?

A test subject wears a Virtual-Reality-Headset (like the HTC-Vive). When the test subject moves forward in the virtual world and stands still in the real world, the subject tends to lean forward in ...
kiaat's user avatar
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Are there established psychological reasons why many see the world from a “dualism” perspective? [duplicate]

By dualism, I’m referring to the tendency of seeing two sides of an issue that appears to be connected yet different. This has been described as dualism, dialectic, etc, by various sources. For ...
J Li's user avatar
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Flashforward moments

I've heard someone describe having what he calls "flashforwards": Moments he lives through which he feels like he remembers from before - on some occasions in situations he definitely did ...
pilot_pirx's user avatar
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65 views

Does the way we see the world in vision change with age? [closed]

I clearly remember a period in my youth where the world looked better, more colorful. Cartoons and videogames, drawings and pictures seemed higher resolution. Around the age of 15 I started noticing ...
Name's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Meaning of a phrase '... reciprocal of neutral density value required arranged on an inverted scale'

The article paramount for my research seems cryptic. It is for visual perception (psychology) and was written 45 years ago. There are a number of sentences hard to 'decypher'. 'reciprocal of neutral ...
ivan866's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
133 views

What scientific evidence is there for the definable real world quality of redness independent our perception?

'With light poise and counter-poise, Nature oscillates within prescribed limits. Yet thus all arise the varieties and conditions of the phenomena which are present to us in space and time.' - Goethe ...
A. E. Sam's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
101 views

Is it generally accepted idea that a memory associated with strong olfactory stimuli will be kept longer?

Question: If you go to see flowers and don't smell them, is it likely that you will forget the event easier than when you do smell them? assuming all the other factors are constant. Here's the story. ...
Hoseung Choi's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
207 views

What is the conceptual difference between causal inference and 'prediction'

Unifying brain theories of cortical function often describe the brain as a prediction machine, based on a generative model (given X, what's the probability of Y). In this context, from Bayesian ...
user2305193's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
767 views

What is the scientific term for the tendency to see familiar patterns in things, that are actually something completely different?

What is the scientific term for the tendency to see familiar patterns in things, that are actually something completely different? One of the most common examples of this bias, is the perception of ...
user1934212's user avatar
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0 answers
47 views

Is the perceived flexibility in this picture (when moving it) related to the perceived curvature when it's not moving?

Look at this picture: All squares are of equal size but when you look at the picture the horizontal and vertical bands they constitute seem to be curved. When you move the picture up and down the ...
Deschele Schilder's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
676 views

What is the bandwidth of visual perception?

Approximately how much "bandwidth", in bits per second, can typical human visual perception process? Consider "The Matrix", where we assume a near-perfect digital encoding that can ...
Abacus's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
75 views

Perceive person's importance to the education

Can we perceive, through some indications, if a person gives too much or too little importance to the education and intellectual formation? Discussing this with some colleagues who say that no because ...
Tiago Martins Peres's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
106 views

Are there "place cells" for temporal encoding?

First of all, I have to say I am not a neuroscientist but I like to learn about neuroscience. I understand there are sets of neurons called "place cells" and "grid cells" which ...
user1941126's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
11 views

Is there an upper bound on signals ascending from the sensory nerves through the medulla?

I'm starting to go down a research path related to haptic and embodied cognition. Though I haven't taken a deep dive into neuroanatomy (only a 300 level undergrad cognitive neuroscience course's worth ...
instroyer's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
29 views

Resources on understanding the Orchestrated objective reduction

I was trying to understand the mathematics behind the theory of Orchestrated objective reduction, and clearly, first I read the original paper of Penrose & Hameroff. Then I tried some other ...
Amirhossein Rezaei's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
113 views

What is the scientific term for the erroneous inversion of cause and effect?

What is the correct scientific term for the - erroneous - inversion of cause and effect?
user1934212's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
127 views

In principle, could a brain be rewired to experience more pleasure and/or pain?

I'm not sure if these are two separate questions, but I'm curious: in theory, could an existing adult mind/brain be modified to perceive pleasure/pain signals more intensely than otherwise? Without ...
productivesnail12's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
64 views

What is the scientific term for the expectation, that a personal experience positively deviates from what first- or second-hand experience suggests?

What is the scientific term for the tendency of people to believe, that their expected experience positively deviates from what their first- or second-hand experience suggests? An example for this ...
user1934212's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
154 views

Term for the tendency to relate events that occurred in proximity?

What is the correct scientific term for the tendency to wrongfully relate arbitrary observations to a significant event, just because they occurred in temporal or spatial proximity? Most recently I ...
user1934212's user avatar

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