Questions tagged [neuroscience]

For questions on the structure and function of the nervous system.

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7
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1answer
179 views

Is V1 involved in visual imagery?

It's well known that mental imagery shares the neural substrates of its respective modality, despite dissociable multivariate patterns. For example, visual imagery can be decoded across the ventral ...
1
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2answers
322 views

Why do people like to listen to sad songs?

Why do people like to listen to sad songs? Sadness is not a positive feeling, so people should avoid it, right? Listening to sad songs is like inflicting some pain to yourself just for pleasure. Did ...
4
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1answer
262 views

What does 'Mean Diffusivity' tell me about the connectivity of cortical areas?

I am reading an article about changes in thalamic volume and connections in relation to age and I understand that thalamic volume decreases with age. The authors find that mean diffusivity (MD) in ...
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0answers
203 views

Do central pattern generators control musical performance?

Are the sometimes very fast and complicated rhythmic movements and often long lasting patterns a musician performs while playing a piece of music generated by central pattern generators (in the sense ...
3
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1answer
51 views

Are inhibitory synapses governed by different chemicals than excitatory synapses?

If a neuron has both excitatory and inhibitory chemical synapses providing it with input, is it true in all organisms that the chemicals that cause the inhibition are distinct from those that cause ...
2
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1answer
99 views

What is “synaptic polarity” in a chemical synapse?

I'm reading a paper and they are discussing modelling the neural networks of an organism. One of the key things they are interested in is finding out the synaptic polarity of chemical synapses. What ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Representations of negated propositions

The following question is quite hypothetical, and just to get an idea. Assume any model of how positive propositions $p$ are actively (opposed to synaptically) represented in a neural network, e.g. "...
2
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1answer
39 views

Does a comparable metaphor exist for cognition that exists for slow & fast twitch muscle fibers?

Skeletal muscles have slow and fast twitch fibers that differ in their rate of fatigue. Is there an analogue in the subject of cognition? For example I might be very quick at doing coding but very ...
1
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0answers
66 views

I am omitting some words when typing unintentionally [duplicate]

When I type mostly I omit word / words. e.g. I wanted to if it is correct -> I wanted to know if it is correct. It should background task -> It should be done in background task. etc. Because of ...
6
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1answer
495 views

Why our brain can't fool itself to constantly produce dopamine?

There are experiments [1] showing that our brain tries to maximize amount of dopamine. At the same time it is the brain who controls the dopamine level, because the reward system is located in the ...
1
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0answers
33 views

Can sport be used as a counselling tool to help one deal with negative life events?

I found studies on how leisure activities can positively affect well-being, e.g. stress reduction. My question is more specific as I want to research how participation in sport can help one deal with ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Do action potential thresholds vary in “capacity” significantly, and if so, does input frequency correspond to action potential thresholds?

To clarify, I'm asking if the level of stimulation / polarization required for a neuron to reach action potential / excite the neuron varies significantly from neuron to neuron- even differing in ...
5
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2answers
1k views

Why does handwriting change?

In New York magazine it is stated: [I]t’s strange that your handwriting changes over time; scientifically speaking, there’s no reason it should. At a certain point, you’ve learned all there is to ...
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0answers
43 views

How to cope with the problem of noise in fMRI?

The sounds and noises that a typical MRI scanner produces are problematic for several reasons: they give - annoying as they are - a strong feel of uncomfortableness to any subject or patient they are ...
5
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2answers
105 views

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

I would like to know what the time scale is of the human ear. I mean, what is the shortest duration of a sound that a human ear can notice and what is the longest duration of a sound that a human ear ...
2
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1answer
161 views

What are the definitions of 'multi-channel coding' and 'opponent channel coding'?

I am looking for the definitions of Multi-channel coding Opponent-channel coding And specifically in the context of visual adaptation. I have searched for information on the web and in books, but ...
4
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1answer
50 views

Simultaneous extracellular recording from different distant sites (in rodents)

I wonder whether it is technically possible today to have simultaneous extracellular recording in awake rodents (e.g., mice) from different non-proximate sites (e.g., V1 and frontal cortex). I mean to ...
4
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1answer
89 views

are serotonin levels higher or lower in dominant vs. non-dominant primates and humans?

On page 242 of The Moral Animal, Robert Wright states that In vervet monkey societies, dominant males have more of the neurotransmitter serotonin than do their subordinates. And one study found ...
4
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0answers
51 views

Why do only about 20% of the people with a heart attack report a near-death experience?

It has been shown that only around 20% of people who get a cardiac arrest and revived could tell something about a near death experience (NDE). But if an NDE is considered to be something with the ...
5
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2answers
1k views

How does speed listening work?

I've recently gotten into listening to podcasts. Over time, as I get accustomed to the speaker's voice, I'm able to increase the speed of the podcast to as high as 3x speed. It still feels "normal" to ...
2
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1answer
1k views

LSD and tryptamines harmless or neurotoxic? [closed]

It's commonly stated by numerous people that LSD and trytamines like DMT and psilocin are physically harmless and not neurotoxic. Is there evidence for this? I recently read 5-meo-Dipt which is a ...
5
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1answer
97 views

Conceptual representations in brain by distributed groups of neurons

It seems generally agreed upon that semantic concepts are distributedly represented by groups and groups of groups of neurons spread over the cortex. Disregarding the localizations, shapes and ...
6
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2answers
77 views

Spike-timing-dependent plasticity versus Homeostatic plasticity

How can spike-timing-dependent plasticity and homeostatic plasticity both be right? If spike-timing-dependent plasticity consistently tries to strengthen connections, but homeostatic plasticity ...
1
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0answers
82 views

What are the names of the white matter tracts in the cortico-ventral basal ganglia circuit?

I am looking at diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. The data is clustered by regions of interest (ROIs). The clusters have locations with names, which I have listed below. Which location names ...
6
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1answer
301 views

Is it dangerous to take an antipsychotic drug irregularly?

I've read the case of Witty Ticcy Ray: a 24 years old man with disabling Tourette’s syndrome. The first Dr. Sacks's treatment, with Haldol, provokes a strong change in Ray's behavior: from tics and ...
1
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0answers
37 views

Does the wrist have more neurons than the finger? [closed]

Once upon a time, I felt an ant crawling on my hand. I couldn't feel it initially, until it reached my wrist. Then I tried to let the ant crawl on my skin; what I found was that I couldn't feel the ...
2
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1answer
806 views

Can brain zaps be demonstrated by EEG?

Brain zaps are explained as an electrical buzz in the head and the symptoms occur while withdrawing slowly from an SSRI antidepressant medication. Is it possible to detect brain zaps by placing EEG ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Does increased neural complexity slows down brain operation speeds?

If a sensory input is perceived, one needs to process this input from the sensory end organ (sensation) up to the brain (perception). Does a more more complex neural network consume more time than a ...
3
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1answer
96 views

The role of high-performance in neuropsychology

As far as I understand, neuropsychology gains most of its insights from the reconciliation of lesions of the brain and cognitive impairments. Normal functioning (both of the brain and the mind) plays ...
3
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1answer
302 views

What is the computational role of the cortical column?

The cortex is supposedly composed of semi uniform cortical columns that are interlinked. Many of the resources on cortical columns I found using a Google search do not discuss what a column computes (...
10
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1answer
77 views

How to differentiate attentiveness, arousal and memory via gamma oscillations

I am planning an experiment using mice with in vivo extracellular recordings (and maybe also optogenetic stimulation). In these kinds of experiments, the mouse is getting a reward after executing a (...
8
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1answer
652 views

What explains the characteristics of the receptive fields of simple cells in V1?

Here is a YouTube video of a Hubel & Wiesel experiment from 1965 in the visual cortex. The video shows the experimenters outlining the receptive field of a simple cell in the first part of the ...
4
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2answers
121 views

Does the peripheral nervous system processes information like central neurons do?

Neural coding deals with the problem on how neurons or a network of neurons processes a stimulus and creates a response in form of electrical action potentials. Information then might be encoded in ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Is our sense of smell heightened when we are asleep?

My question is whether our sense of smell is stronger when we sleep? From an evolutionary perspective this could have been beneficial in terms of runaway camp fires, marauding saber tooth tigers or ...
5
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1answer
696 views

Psychological theories about the end of a romantic relationship

There's no doubt: many couples break and many marriages break, what happens in these cases? In the loving encounter brain areas aimed at judgment and critical analysis, are clouded by an increase of ...
7
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2answers
482 views

Why could too much BDNF be detrimental in terms of depression and memory?

I am interested in looking at the effects of too much BDNF and other proteins such as repressor element one silencing transcription factor (REST). Most research suggest that elevated levels are ...
3
votes
1answer
402 views

Where can I find the connectivity matrix of the connectome of C. Elegans?

I am trying to find the entire connectivity matrix for the connectome of the roundworm C. elegans. It is a much studied animal, as it features just a handful of neurons in its nervous system, 302 to ...
1
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2answers
117 views

Pleasure can be implicated in a chemical reaction in the brain, but does this really affect the intensity of the feeling?

It is true that many, if not all feelings of our mind like euphoria, dysphoria, pleasure, sadness et cetera are linked to a chemical reaction in our brain. This reaction is essentially what causes us ...
1
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1answer
85 views

What happens in my retina if I press on my eyeballs?

If I press my eyes I can "see" all kind of things: sparkling blue dots (which sometimes seem random and sometimes there seems to be a pattern in them), growing or diminishing rings of all kinds of ...
3
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1answer
143 views

Are all dendrites targeted by an axon, or are there a lot of “empty” dendrites?

As far as I understand, one neuron can have up to 200 000 dendrites (e.g. purkinje cells). As for axons, there can be only one per neuron, which can divide into thousands (but not hundreds of ...
3
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1answer
69 views

Biological Plausibility of FORCE training

In "Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks with FORCE Training" by Wilten Nicola and Claudia Clopath. The authors create a learning rule for learning non-linear dynamics from populations of ...
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0answers
40 views

What's the relation between PES and LSA?

In "Learning by stimulation avoidance: A principle to control spiking neural networks dynamics" by Sinpayen et al. a learning rule called Learning by Stimulation Avoidance (LSA) is presented. ...
3
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1answer
126 views

Why is PES biologically plausible?

The NEF puts great emphasis on biological plausibility. However, I'm not clear on why the Prescribed Error Sensitivity (PES) learning rule, used in many NEF-based models, is considered to be ...
4
votes
1answer
155 views

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

The retinotopic, area-based connectivity patterns of the columnar receptive fields in the visual cortex are well-established. Do any mappings of the columnar receptive field connectivity patterns ...
5
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1answer
2k views

How do brain zaps occur?

I've recently witnessed someone undergoing brain zaps and subsequent panic attacks after having stopped their SSRI medication and 48 hours partying with heavy boozing and no sleep. Having reviewed ...
4
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1answer
110 views

Latency between actual neurons firing and muscles response in open and close fist experiment

I'm trying to analyze the electrocorticograms (ECoG) of opening and closing the fist. I have the data of a glove to capture when the hand moves. I'm struggling with finding the best epoch or segment ...
3
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1answer
308 views

Understanding Melatonin

Is my understanding roughly correct? Melatonin is 'generated' in the absence of specific wavelengths of light. It accumulates and is only reduced by sleep, in particular REM sleep. Melatonin and ...
6
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2answers
70 views

How does neuron stimulation work?

Neurons are excited via an external electrode by passing current through it. A neuron at rest is at -70 mV, it needs additional charge amounting to around 15 mV to initiate an action potential. But ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Why the brain region with less activity is not more responsible for some action?

From my naive understanding, it seems that when people try to find correlations between a human action and a certain pattern of activity in the brain, they measure the brain activity with some device ...
2
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1answer
366 views

Is it true that stimulants make neurons fire more often, and depressants make them fire less often?

Is it true that stimulants and the neurotransmitters they mimic, push into the synapse, or keep in the synapse (e.g. dopamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine) make neurons fire more often, while ...