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Questions tagged [neuroscience]

For questions on the structure and function of the nervous system.

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1answer
280 views

Is it dangerous to take an antipsychotic drug irregularly?

I've read the case of Witty Ticcy Ray: a 24 years old man with disabling Tourette’s syndrome. The first Dr. Sacks's treatment, with Haldol, provokes a strong change in Ray's behavior: from tics and ...
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0answers
37 views

Does the wrist have more neurons than the finger? [closed]

Once upon a time, I felt an ant crawling on my hand. I couldn't feel it initially, until it reached my wrist. Then I tried to let the ant crawl on my skin; what I found was that I couldn't feel the ...
2
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1answer
669 views

Can brain zaps be demonstrated by EEG?

Brain zaps are explained as an electrical buzz in the head and the symptoms occur while withdrawing slowly from an SSRI antidepressant medication. Is it possible to detect brain zaps by placing EEG ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Does increased neural complexity slows down brain operation speeds?

If a sensory input is perceived, one needs to process this input from the sensory end organ (sensation) up to the brain (perception). Does a more more complex neural network consume more time than a ...
4
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1answer
95 views

The role of high-performance in neuropsychology

As far as I understand, neuropsychology gains most of its insights from the reconciliation of lesions of the brain and cognitive impairments. Normal functioning (both of the brain and the mind) plays ...
3
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1answer
248 views

What is the computational role of the cortical column?

The cortex is supposedly composed of semi uniform cortical columns that are interlinked. Many of the resources on cortical columns I found using a Google search do not discuss what a column computes (...
10
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1answer
75 views

How to differentiate attentiveness, arousal and memory via gamma oscillations

I am planning an experiment using mice with in vivo extracellular recordings (and maybe also optogenetic stimulation). In these kinds of experiments, the mouse is getting a reward after executing a (...
8
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1answer
533 views

What explains the characteristics of the receptive fields of simple cells in V1?

Here is a YouTube video of a Hubel & Wiesel experiment from 1965 in the visual cortex. The video shows the experimenters outlining the receptive field of a simple cell in the first part of the ...
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2answers
114 views

Does the peripheral nervous system processes information like central neurons do?

Neural coding deals with the problem on how neurons or a network of neurons processes a stimulus and creates a response in form of electrical action potentials. Information then might be encoded in ...
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1answer
56 views

Is our sense of smell heightened when we are asleep?

My question is whether our sense of smell is stronger when we sleep? From an evolutionary perspective this could have been beneficial in terms of runaway camp fires, marauding saber tooth tigers or ...
5
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1answer
578 views

Psychological theories about the end of a romantic relationship

There's no doubt: many couples break and many marriages break, what happens in these cases? In the loving encounter brain areas aimed at judgment and critical analysis, are clouded by an increase of ...
5
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1answer
360 views

Why could too much BDNF be detrimental in terms of depression and memory?

I am interested in looking at the effects of too much BDNF and other proteins such as repressor element one silencing transcription factor (REST). Most research suggest that elevated levels are ...
3
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1answer
355 views

Where can I find the connectivity matrix of the connectome of C. Elegans?

I am trying to find the entire connectivity matrix for the connectome of the roundworm C. elegans. It is a much studied animal, as it features just a handful of neurons in its nervous system, 302 to ...
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2answers
77 views

Pleasure can be implicated in a chemical reaction in the brain, but does this really affect the intensity of the feeling?

It is true that many, if not all feelings of our mind like euphoria, dysphoria, pleasure, sadness et cetera are linked to a chemical reaction in our brain. This reaction is essentially what causes us ...
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1answer
77 views

What happens in my retina if I press on my eyeballs?

If I press my eyes I can "see" all kind of things: sparkling blue dots (which sometimes seem random and sometimes there seems to be a pattern in them), growing or diminishing rings of all kinds of ...
3
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1answer
135 views

Are all dendrites targeted by an axon, or are there a lot of “empty” dendrites?

As far as I understand, one neuron can have up to 200 000 dendrites (e.g. purkinje cells). As for axons, there can be only one per neuron, which can divide into thousands (but not hundreds of ...
4
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1answer
63 views

Biological Plausibility of FORCE training

In "Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks with FORCE Training" by Wilten Nicola and Claudia Clopath. The authors create a learning rule for learning non-linear dynamics from populations of ...
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0answers
33 views

What's the relation between PES and LSA?

In "Learning by stimulation avoidance: A principle to control spiking neural networks dynamics" by Sinpayen et al. a learning rule called Learning by Stimulation Avoidance (LSA) is presented. ...
4
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1answer
103 views

Why is PES biologically plausible?

The NEF puts great emphasis on biological plausibility. However, I'm not clear on why the Prescribed Error Sensitivity (PES) learning rule, used in many NEF-based models, is considered to be ...
4
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1answer
154 views

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

The retinotopic, area-based connectivity patterns of the columnar receptive fields in the visual cortex are well-established. Do any mappings of the columnar receptive field connectivity patterns ...
6
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1answer
1k views

How do brain zaps occur?

I've recently witnessed someone undergoing brain zaps and subsequent panic attacks after having stopped their SSRI medication and 48 hours partying with heavy boozing and no sleep. Having reviewed ...
5
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1answer
98 views

Latency between actual neurons firing and muscles response in open and close fist experiment

I'm trying to analyze the electrocorticograms (ECoG) of opening and closing the fist. I have the data of a glove to capture when the hand moves. I'm struggling with finding the best epoch or segment ...
3
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1answer
234 views

Understanding Melatonin

Is my understanding roughly correct? Melatonin is 'generated' in the absence of specific wavelengths of light. It accumulates and is only reduced by sleep, in particular REM sleep. Melatonin and ...
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2answers
69 views

How does neuron stimulation work?

Neurons are excited via an external electrode by passing current through it. A neuron at rest is at -70 mV, it needs additional charge amounting to around 15 mV to initiate an action potential. But ...
3
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1answer
56 views

Why the brain region with less activity is not more responsible for some action?

From my naive understanding, it seems that when people try to find correlations between a human action and a certain pattern of activity in the brain, they measure the brain activity with some device ...
2
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1answer
307 views

Is it true that stimulants make neurons fire more often, and depressants make them fire less often?

Is it true that stimulants and the neurotransmitters they mimic, push into the synapse, or keep in the synapse (e.g. dopamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine) make neurons fire more often, while ...
3
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1answer
815 views

Can color blindness be treated with image filtering technology?

Using image color-filtering techniques we can simulate the way colorblind people see: The aim of this question is to know whether the opposite process could be possible, namely can a colorblind ...
5
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1answer
2k views

How do congenitally deaf and mute people think?

If a person is born deaf and dumb, how can they think? In "what language" do these people think? Do they develop their own inner language? Unfortunately I have not found an answer, and I actually ...
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4answers
333 views

Why is depression a diagnosable issue?

To me, it seems strange that something such as depression, which anyone can feel at any given time, is diagnosed and treated medically as if it is a mental disorder. I believe depression should be ...
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0answers
33 views

How to connect two networks in NEURON software? [closed]

So my goal is to connect STN and SNc neurons by giving synaptic weights and then see the response. I have already modelled STN and SNc separately and observed their response. I need help with the ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Article for bypassing spinal cord after spinal cord injury

This article describes a research that allows a man with spinal cord injury (SCI) at the cervical level to move his finger. A chip was used to circumvent the spinal cord and send signals to the finger ...
4
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1answer
343 views

where can i find preprocessed fmri data set for alzheimer's disease

I want to work on identification of Alzheimer's patients based on given fMRI data.Basically, I want to implement the following paper https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25907414. Where can I get ...
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0answers
70 views

Good Resources for Learning Modeling of fMRI Data [closed]

As a neuroscience student who works with fMRI I'm competent at the standard univariate analyses and resting state analysis techniques in AFNI and MATLAB/SPM. However, I want to learn how to use models ...
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1answer
66 views

People with dead nerves cell, can they feel pain/emotions?

Exactly what the title said, can they feel love/sad/hurt/disgust/fear/etc, emotions, after their neurons are dead? Also are there specific nerves for each emotion that transmits emotion? So let's say ...
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0answers
32 views

Are there any approaches to measuring “physical”/“neurophysiological” aspects of one's intellectual tone/state of fluid intelligence?

Is it possible to measure/approximate/estimate intelligence with a physiological metric? What I mean is, if I put it correctly: to measure/estimate short-term memory capacity/long-term memory ...
2
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1answer
38 views

Excitatory impulse speed vs inhibitory

Is there a difference in speed of impulses created by excitatory and inhibitory neurons?
5
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1answer
399 views

What is the meaning of the peak polarity in EEG data?

I wish to define neuronal activities by analyzing the peaks of each channel in EEG signals. Some papers use the negative peaks as a measure of neuronal activity and others deploy the positive peaks. ...
8
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1answer
154 views

Does training affect the tactile oblique effect?

In the visual sciences it is known that the oblique effect can be reduced by means of training. The oblique effect is observed when testing subjects psychophysically with a grating acuity task (e.g., ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Difference between the cingulate gyrus and the cingulate cortex

I am doing an analysis of the brain of the Creature in Frankenstein by looking at its actions and experiences from a scientific perspective. For this, I was wondering: What is the difference between ...
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1answer
44 views

Books on Neurological functions?

Are there any books anyone can recommend that do not have any or much in the way of prerequisites but go through the anatomy of the central nervous system while laying out in detail the functions of ...
4
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1answer
102 views

Activation of brain reasoning areas during dreaming

I would say that dreaming is like any conscious experience, except that objective reasoning is turned off. Do fMRI imaging studies indicate that the reasoning centers of the brain are inactive during ...
6
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1answer
205 views

What do you call sensations without stimuli?

Sometimes, when you close your eyes in the dark, you see what looks like sparks or flashes. Sometimes when you are tired, your vision seems to shift sideways and realign, like someone bumped into a ...
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1answer
65 views

Searching for real biological neuron firing data [numeric] [closed]

I am searching for real neuron firing data, so I can look at each neuron for fire timing (frequency) and incoming/outgoing signal-strength. I already found short youtube videos of real neuron firing ...
4
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1answer
397 views

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

How does our brain translate periheral sensations due to injuries into pain perceptions? As an in silico analogy - if a stimulus is applied to a sensor it can be transmitted to a microprocessor. The ...
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1answer
47 views

Best way to modeling ADHD? [closed]

...with computer models? ( hacking the executive functions of something like this, for making the algorithm more "impulsive", or "inattentive".) ...with animal models? ( using "SHR rat-like", ...
7
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1answer
96 views

Difference in hemispheres when processing of somatosensory information

We know from many studies (see e.g. Taylor, 2009 for an empirical and experiential overview) that processing of information is massively heterogeneous with respect to hemisphere. How does this ...
4
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1answer
319 views

Function of heart neural network?

I have found articles the try to give a possible biological neural network for the movement of limbs, neurons in the eyes, etc. Is there an explanation on how the neural network that controls the ...
6
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1answer
80 views

Is there a complete connectome of a minicolumn of the neocortex?

I know that there are projects that try to map brain connectivity. My question is whether there is a dataset available with the complete connectivity of just a single minicolumn of the neocortex. ...
5
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between apparent motion and apparent movement?

A definition for apparent movement is: The perception of movement produced by stimuli that are stationary but are presented first at one position and then, at an appropriate time interval, ...
3
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1answer
140 views

How does the intravenous administration of cholecystokinin provoke panic attacks?

Background I recently read a paper (The James-Lange theory of emotions: a critical examination and an alternative theory), in which the James-Lange Theory was challenged by Walter Bradford Cannon. ...