Questions tagged [neurophysiology]

The study of the physiology of the nervous system, with emphasis on transcellular communication, and cellular and molecular processes involved in neural communication.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
0answers
104 views

What are the names of the white matter tracts in the cortico-ventral basal ganglia circuit?

I am looking at diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. The data are clustered by regions of interest (ROIs). The clusters have locations with names, which I have listed below. Which location names ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Does increased neural complexity slows down brain operation speeds?

If a sensory input is perceived, one needs to process this input from the sensory end organ (sensation) up to the brain (perception). Does a more more complex neural network consume more time than a ...
3
votes
1answer
435 views

What is the computational role of the cortical column?

The cortex is supposedly composed of semi uniform cortical columns that are interlinked. Many of the resources on cortical columns I found using a Google search do not discuss what a column computes (...
10
votes
1answer
82 views

How to differentiate attentiveness, arousal and memory via gamma oscillations

I am planning an experiment using mice with in vivo extracellular recordings (and maybe also optogenetic stimulation). In these kinds of experiments, the mouse is getting a reward after executing a (...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What explains the characteristics of the receptive fields of simple cells in V1?

Here is a YouTube video of a Hubel & Wiesel experiment from 1965 in the visual cortex. The video shows the experimenters outlining the receptive field of a simple cell in the first part of the ...
4
votes
2answers
140 views

Does the peripheral nervous system processes information like central neurons do?

Neural coding deals with the problem on how neurons or a network of neurons processes a stimulus and creates a response in form of electrical action potentials. Information then might be encoded in ...
3
votes
1answer
484 views

Where can I find the connectivity matrix of the connectome of C. Elegans?

I am trying to find the entire connectivity matrix for the connectome of the roundworm C. elegans. It is a much studied animal, as it features just a handful of neurons in its nervous system, 302 to ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Pleasure can be implicated in a chemical reaction in the brain, but does this really affect the intensity of the feeling?

It is true that many, if not all feelings of our mind like euphoria, dysphoria, pleasure, sadness et cetera are linked to a chemical reaction in our brain. This reaction is essentially what causes us ...
1
vote
1answer
499 views

What happens in my retina if I press on my eyeballs?

If I press my eyes I can "see" all kind of things: sparkling blue dots (which sometimes seem random and sometimes there seems to be a pattern in them), growing or diminishing rings of all kinds of ...
3
votes
1answer
213 views

Are all dendrites targeted by an axon, or are there a lot of "empty" dendrites?

As far as I understand, one neuron can have up to 200 000 dendrites (e.g. purkinje cells). As for axons, there can be only one per neuron, which can divide into thousands (but not hundreds of ...
4
votes
1answer
169 views

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

The retinotopic, area-based connectivity patterns of the columnar receptive fields in the visual cortex are well-established. Do any mappings of the columnar receptive field connectivity patterns ...
6
votes
2answers
78 views

How does neuron stimulation work?

Neurons are excited via an external electrode by passing current through it. A neuron at rest is at -70 mV, it needs additional charge amounting to around 15 mV to initiate an action potential. But ...
2
votes
1answer
499 views

Is it true that stimulants make neurons fire more often, and depressants make them fire less often?

Is it true that stimulants and the neurotransmitters they mimic, push into the synapse, or keep in the synapse (e.g. dopamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine) make neurons fire more often, while ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Can color blindness be treated with image filtering technology?

Using image color-filtering techniques we can simulate the way colorblind people see: The aim of this question is to know whether the opposite process could be possible, namely can a colorblind ...
7
votes
1answer
483 views

Does the split brain disprove a materialistic mind?

According to materialism, the conscious mind is the product of the brain. Thus, if the brain is split in half such that the two hemispheres cannot communicate with each other, then there are three ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

get signal from eye neurons

Hi guys you know some scientists could get electronic signals from brain and move it to muscles (full article here) My question is: can we get signal from eye neurons and analyze it with a computer ...
4
votes
2answers
496 views

Do neurons fire at a faster rate during dreaming?

When I dream it seems that the (subjective) time is slower than the objectively passed time as seen on my clock radio. Is this because neurones fire collectively at a faster rate, so you can "put an ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

Length of neuro-physiological signals of emotion compared to feeling time

In "Determinants of Emotion Duration and Underlying Psychological and Neural Mechanisms" by Verduyn et al. discuss how certain physiological signals are outlasted by actual feelings: In particular, ...
4
votes
1answer
662 views

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

How does our brain translate periheral sensations due to injuries into pain perceptions? As an in silico analogy - if a stimulus is applied to a sensor it can be transmitted to a microprocessor. The ...
3
votes
0answers
689 views

What happens in the brain during mid-life crisis?

I was just told by an elder that midlife crisis occurs during an adult stage and it is a time whereby an adult starts having several thoughts concerning his/her life. After my research, I found out ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between apparent motion and apparent movement?

A definition for apparent movement is: The perception of movement produced by stimuli that are stationary but are presented first at one position and then, at an appropriate time interval, presented ...
3
votes
1answer
244 views

What are the differences between Orch OR and Hartley's vibratiuncles?

Roger Penrose and Stuart Hameroff have a theory called Orgastrated Objective Reduction or Orch OR, and they claim this has been confirmed. The article says: "The origin of consciousness reflects ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

How is an action potential conducted across axonal branches in a neuron?

As the action potential travels in the dendrite towards the cell body, it may encounter axonal branches. What happens at the branch? What makes it go to the cell body instead of other dendrite? ...
4
votes
4answers
276 views

"Nested Neurons": Are they biologically plausible?

Is there any evidence for neurons existing within other neurons in humans or other organisms? From what little I've learned about physical neuroscience while learning to build neural nets, I don't see ...
6
votes
1answer
530 views

Physiology behind EEG measurements

Many questions were asked about general procedures of Electroencephalography (EEG), which were phrased in a rather specific context. Not only were these questions hard to find, they might also be ...
4
votes
0answers
338 views

What neural mechanism explains the phenomenon that bad memories fade faster than good ones?

Several studies have suggested that negative memories fade faster than positive memories: Walker, Vogl and Thompson (1997) had the subjects kept dairy during a 3-month period, and rated the events on ...
1
vote
2answers
224 views

Why is Potassium(K) important to neurology & the brain?

When researching the pharmacological mechanisms of action and interactions that various psychotropic drugs, poisons, neurotoxins, etc. have on the brain: I frequently see off-hand references to the ...
6
votes
1answer
273 views

Does STDP make the Hebbian learning rule redundant?

On Scholarpedia they introduce STDP (spike timing dependent plasticity) as a temporally asymmetric form of Hebbian learning, making it sound as if the original Hebbian rule still has relevance in ...
9
votes
1answer
4k views

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Different areas of the inner ear (the cochlea) are sensitive to different acoustic frequencies. Hence, the cochlea basically performs a fast Fourier transform on the audio signal. This spectral ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Are there bidirectional neurons?

Neurons are mostly unidirectional, i.e. electrical impulses enter from one end and leave through the other. Are there bidirectional neurons as well, i.e., neurons that have a receiving end and a ...
5
votes
2answers
170 views

What's the relation between firing of dopaminergic neurons and dopamine dispersion in terms of neurophysiological processes?

Question: How does the firing of dopaminergic neurons affect the dispersal of dopamine? Evidence of my limited familiarity with dopaminergic neurons and motivation for asking the question: Most of ...
2
votes
1answer
814 views

How do people with a split brain experience reality?

Some people with severe epileptic seizures have the connection between their two brain halves cut. How appears reality for them, and why does this procedure helps them?
2
votes
1answer
145 views

What is the relation of visual quality and distance from the central field of view?

I have read somewhere that Our visual perception degrades non-linearly with distance from the fovea. However, it was not referenced. I was wondering if there is a reference talking about this? ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the purpose of non-spiking and anaxonic neurons?

What is the purpose of non-spiking neurons and anaxonic neurons in neural tissue?
4
votes
2answers
180 views

Do we perceive contrast colour patterns easily because of adaptation?

I can understand that colours are just manipulation of our brain to light rays of different wavelength and energy. We perceive patterns better at higher contrast. Do we perceive patterns better at ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

If the color black reflects no light, how are we able to see it?

If color as we perceive it is dependent on the wave lengths that are reflected by an object, with white reflecting all hues and black absorbing all, how do we detect a black object? I do understand ...
2
votes
1answer
637 views

What is the function of the connection between the two halves of the thalamus?

What kind of direct exchange do we have between the two halves of the thalamus, whether going through the thalamic adhesion or not? Do we know what parts of left and right thalamus are connected and ...
5
votes
2answers
370 views

Can LSD connect sensory regions in the brain?

How is it possible that after using LSD you can hear sounds and see colors? I have my own experience with this phenomenon. When I´m lying totally relaxed in bed and suddenly a door is closed loudly, I ...
5
votes
1answer
124 views

Can neuron change from excitatory to inhibitory (and vice versa) over time?

According to this answer a neuron can release only specific type of neurotransmitters at the time, however, could it change over time? For example a neuron that now releases only inhibitory ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Can a hyperpolarized neuron fire action potentials?

Is there any chance that a neuron could fire when hyperpolarized? In that case, would the spike be different than usual?
3
votes
1answer
99 views

What prevents a neuron from activating an incoming synapse?

As is known, a neuron can have incoming and outgoing synapses. When a neuron fires, what does prevent that only outgoing synapses are activated?
5
votes
1answer
113 views

When does reward occur? When dopamine is released or when it is binded?

I know this is a silly question, but I'm curious as to what is the exact phase when we experience of the thrill of doing an exciting activity. I believe this briefly describes the whole process. So, ...
2
votes
1answer
241 views

Do direct cortical pathways exist in the visual system, or do they all go via the thalamus?

Do visual cortical signals always go back and forth between the thalamus, or other subcortical structures, or can they travel directly from one region in the cortex to another?
5
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the definition of a receptive field?

I have read the wikipedia article on receptive fields (RFs). There, a receptive field is defined as: The receptive field of an individual sensory neuron is the particular region of the sensory ...
3
votes
1answer
511 views

What is the location of the center-surround receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells?

I have read wikipedia article about receptive fields of visual system and it states the following: The receptive field is often identified as the region of the retina where the action of light ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What advantages does a neuron with multiple dendrites have?

What advantages does a neuron with multiple dendrites have, as opposed to one with fewer dendrites?
5
votes
2answers
401 views

Can two neurons in the brain be connected more than once?

Can two given neurons in the human brain can be directly connected more than once, either mutually or in the same or direction? Also, can the same neuron have transitive connections to itself (in ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Where can I find good references about the neuronal connections in various areas in the cortex?

As an example, I would like to know which Brodmann areas innervate the layer IV of area 10 in the brain. To which degree are these connections known? What are good books or other kinds of resources ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Does the retina contribute in distinguishing lines and borders?

I think there is a phenomenon behind the way which our eyes judge between lines of contrast, like black lines on a white page, by just recognizing the contrast areas at the level of the rods and cones....
5
votes
1answer
778 views

What are 'gap junctions' (electrical synapses) for?

I was reading this and I found the following sentences: Apart from chemical synapses neurons can also be coupled by electrical synapses, so-called gap junctions. Specialized membrane proteins make ...