Questions tagged [neurophysiology]

The study of the physiology of the nervous system, with emphasis on transcellular communication, and cellular and molecular processes involved in neural communication.

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What are the necessary preconditions for the emergence of a conscience?

I am aware of 2 brain anomalies that seem to be associated with the non-emergence of a conscience. One is associated with psychopathy. The other is associated with narcissism. psychopathy: My ...
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134 views

Is there a region of the brain that mediates pain in a manner reminiscent of the mesolimbic pathway?

The mesolimbic dopamine pathway is a common neural pathway upon which rewards converge AKA the pleasure pathway. So I am trying to find a comparable pathway in the brain for pain -- is there such a ...
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933 views

Does adult neurogenesis occur only in the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus?

The scholarpedia article on this subject says: Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons which integrate into existing circuits after fetal and early postnatal development has ...
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566 views

How do neurons decide how to alter their output signals?

In computer science, neural networks are trained using backpropagation and other methods. Backpropagation heavily relies on mathematical formulas to describe how the weights should be changed ...
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79 views

Neural oscillations and activity patterns

Both single neurons and groups of neurons can generate oscillatory activity spontaneously. In addition, they may show oscillatory responses to perceptual input or motor output. Even memory and ...
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When does reward occur? When dopamine is released or when it is binded?

I know this is a silly question, but I'm curious as to what is the exact phase when we experience of the thrill of doing an exciting activity. I believe this briefly describes the whole process. So, ...
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662 views

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

How does our brain translate periheral sensations due to injuries into pain perceptions? As an in silico analogy - if a stimulus is applied to a sensor it can be transmitted to a microprocessor. The ...
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7k views

How many dendrite connections vs axon terminals does a multipolar cerebral neuron have?

I find countless places stating that neurons have tens of thousands of "connections" or "synapses" and one axon. Do neurons have tens of thousands of dendrite connections, and a few axon terminals; ...
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4k views

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Different areas of the inner ear (the cochlea) are sensitive to different acoustic frequencies. Hence, the cochlea basically performs a fast Fourier transform on the audio signal. This spectral ...
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265 views

How is tone volume encoded?

I am wondering whether increasing the volume would result in (a) a neuron that was already firing to now increase its spike rate, (b) a different group of neurons to add their activity to the ...
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817 views

Frissons on demand

Have you ever listened to music and it gives you "chills?" This response is called a "frisson," a french word meaning "to shiver." When I want to access certain emotional and inspirationally charged ...
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483 views

Does the split brain disprove a materialistic mind?

According to materialism, the conscious mind is the product of the brain. Thus, if the brain is split in half such that the two hemispheres cannot communicate with each other, then there are three ...
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159 views

How does it come about that specific areas of the brain are associated with specific functions?

During the development of the human brain, specific areas come to perform specific functions. How (and when) does this differentiation come about? Presumably, some areas of the brain naturally take ...
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Are there bidirectional neurons?

Neurons are mostly unidirectional, i.e. electrical impulses enter from one end and leave through the other. Are there bidirectional neurons as well, i.e., neurons that have a receiving end and a ...
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What degree of control do we have on eye movements?

When something "new" and "interesting" enters our visual field it can usually happen that our eyes move toward the new target. How "intentional" and "controllable&...
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496 views

Do neurons fire at a faster rate during dreaming?

When I dream it seems that the (subjective) time is slower than the objectively passed time as seen on my clock radio. Is this because neurones fire collectively at a faster rate, so you can "put an ...
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90 views

Can signals from the prefrontal cortex alone trigger a readiness potential in the pre-supplementary motor area?

Background In Haggard, Patrick. "Human volition: towards a neuroscience of will." Nature Reviews Neuroscience 9.12 (2008): 934., the author states in the caption of Figure 1 (pg. 4): The ...
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55 views

Voltage-dependent ion channels as operators

Does it make sense (or is even the standard approach) to model mathematically a voltage-dependent ion channel not as a function, that maps a voltage to a conductance ($f:\mathbb{R}\rightarrow \mathbb{...
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180 views

What is the frequency range of electrotactile stimulation?

I have been trying to find out what the (human) electrotactile frequency range is. Since this is a much more experimental method (and more unpleasant) than the traditional vibrotactile method, the ...
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Functional vs. synaptic connectivity

I used to believe that connectivity is nothing but synaptic connectivity and thus a long-term concept: synapses grow and synaptic strengths change on rather large time scales. But recently I found ...