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Questions tagged [neurophysiology]

The study of the physiology of the nervous system, with emphasis on transcellular communication, and cellular and molecular processes involved in neural communication.

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Can signals from the prefrontal cortex alone trigger a readiness potential in the pre-supplementary motor area?

Background In Haggard, Patrick. "Human volition: towards a neuroscience of will." Nature Reviews Neuroscience 9.12 (2008): 934., the author states in the caption of Figure 1 (pg. 4): The ...
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When does the brain stem appear in humans?

When does the brain stem appear in humans? The following article states: Once the neural tube closes, at around week 6 or week 7 of pregnancy, it curves and bulges into three sections, commonly ...
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Why is median motor nerve conduction velocity about 50 m/s?

I recently started reading Fitzgerald's clinical neuroanatomy and neuroscience (Mtui, et al. 2015) and reached chapter 12, electrodiagnostic examination, yesterday. The chapter deals, i.a., with nerve ...
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What are the neuroscience research findings on the importance of breaks in cognitive function and specifically learning?

When I say breaks I mean breaks between periods of the same course, breaks between two distinct courses, single days of, weekends, couple days of, few days of, longer periods of holidays of duration ...
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What constitutes an emotional disorder?

Watson, et al. (2008) states that a superclass of mood and anxiety disorders should be given a nonspecific label, such as ‘emotional disorders’. They stated that this superclass can be decomposed ...
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What's the difference between the neuroendocrine system vs endocrine system?

No one in the Biology site seems to be answering this, so I thought I'd post it here as a last resort. I would really appreciate if you guys can take a look at it. This is what I have understood so ...
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Can the brain be enhanced by adding more neurons?

I was wondering of ways to enhance the brain. Couldn't we add a sort of substance to improve the brain? Will it somehow adapt? The brain should 'wire up' the new substance to the existing one. As ...
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Are neural adaptation and drug tolerance to psychoactive drugs related?

Neural adaptation is "...a change over time in the responsiveness of the sensory system to a constant stimulus". The example given is placing your hand on the surface of a table. Eventually, you no ...
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Do neurons involved in reflex movements process information or they just transmit a signal?

According to Reflex A reflex, or reflex action, is an involuntary and nearly instantaneous movement in response to a stimulus. A reflex is made possible by neural pathways called reflex arcs which ...
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Can a device create/guide neuron connections between them?

Is there a device of some sort that could promote/guide/create exact connections between neurons? I wish there was a device that could get me PhD by just wearing it for a few months.
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Integrated Information Theory - If correct could humans create artificial consciousness?

First off please keep in mind I am self-learning and am learning about this for fun, I have no end goal. I'm trying to make predictions about what I am learning implies or means, so I can ask better ...
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Are there animals with only excitatory neurons?

Are there animals with only excitatory neurons? I am not sure it is possible. Also, maybe excitation/inhibition can become relative? I however will be happy to read your opinion.. For example, are ...
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What is the difference between principal neurons and pyramidal cells?

I am reading Kandel's "Principals of Neural Sciences". There the book sometimes refers to excitatory neurons as principal cells, and sometimes as pyramidal cells. Can anyone tell me the difference? ...
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Unilateral vision in split brain subjects

I am just beginning to learn psychology and came across concept of split brain. I was wondering if a person has only left eye working and has their corpus callosum cut, would they be effectively blind ...
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How does caffeine work as an analgesic adjuvant?

Caffeine is used an adjuvant in over-the-couner pain medication, e.g. added to paracetamol and/or aspirin. A brief look at the Wikipedia page on caffeine doesn't indicate any analgesic effect of ...
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How are tactile pleasure and pain differentiated in the somatosensory cortex?

A recent question here asked about (mostly) how pain and pleasure are differentiated in pathways involving reward/aversion cues. But there was some confusion as to what the question really wanted to ...
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Is there a region of the brain that mediates pain in a manner reminiscent of the mesolimbic pathway?

The mesolimbic dopamine pathway is a common neural pathway upon which rewards converge AKA the pleasure pathway. So I am trying to find a comparable pathway in the brain for pain -- is there such a ...
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Will studying formal logic improves logical reasoning?

Reason for asking question: I am looking to see if there is any good empirical evidence or study that shows or suggests that studying former logic or maybe informal logic would actually improve ...
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Is Dr. Russo’s “endocannabinoid deficiency” a valid theory?

There was a study published in Neuro Endocrinology Letters by Dr. Ethan Russo in 2004 that says many diseases being treated with cannabis correlate with an “endocannabinoid deficiency”, but I cannot ...
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Frissons on demand

Have you ever listened to music and it gives you "chills?" This response is called a "frisson," a french word meaning "to shiver." When I want to access certain emotional and inspirationally charged ...
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Performance of a damaged brain

I have heard stories/reports that if a certain part of the brain (taking care of certain functions) is damaged other parts take over the function of the damaged part. Intuitively this could mean 2 ...
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Does anybody know a source having multi-electrode (several channels) recorded data of multiple Neurons (I prefer real data not artificial)?

I mean recorded data of multiple Neurons with multi-electrode. I need this data as the input for my experiment.
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What introductory textbook is available about the corticostriatal brain circuitry?

I want to understand the basal ganglia better. In particular, I want to understand the role of the corticostriatal brain circuitry for non-motor functions, including emotion and cognition. I have ...
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Can you get sad by sniffing onions, just like you can get happy by forcing yourself to smile?

I've read about a study where they found that people who were forced to keep a smile-like face were reportedly happier than those who were forced to stay in a frown-like a face. Similarly, could ...
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How serious is my case and should I get help? [closed]

So I have been experimenting a bit with pshycadelics nothing too much , I did lsd twice in a period of 3 months , inbetween i have done mdma once. Two weeks after my last use of lsd I started noticing ...
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Names of branches of neuroscience and related fields dealing with hunger, taste, attachment, and digestion, and their relationship to other perception

I would like to know what the branches of neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, and psychiatry related to what happens when the tongue touches and other possible related mouth sensors, touch, ...
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Can reuptake absorb a selective or non-selective agonist?

For example, a lot of antipsychotics are chemically similar to serotonin, and at least partially trigger certain types of serotonin receptors. Is there any evidence to suggest that, because of their ...
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Does NMDA-receptor activation depend on neighboring AMPA-receptor activity?

This question is coming out of a couple points of confusion after I learned about about NMDA receptors' role in LTP. I got the impression that after AMPA receptors were activated enough, which ...
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Stroke amelioration

Excessive sugar, like Pepsi, is considered harmful. However, I am wondering if it could be helpful if taken by a victim of stroke during or immediately after a stroke, or somewhat after a stroke? My ...
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2answers
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Can an axon connect to dendrites of multiple other neurons?

In a typical multi-polar neuron, an axon has multiple axon terminals that can connect to another neuron's dendrites. Are there cases where an axon connects to dendrites of multiple neurons?
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Is Tinnitus a result of brain damage?

It is well known that loud noises can lead to hearing problems such as temporary hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and even permanent hearing loss. But this is the first time scientists ...
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Why does a higher post-synaptic cell resistance lead to a higher voltage change when current is applied?

In the "Principles of Neural Science" 5th edition in the discussion about electrical synapses it says: During excitatory synaptic transmission at an electrical synapse, voltage-gated ion channels ...
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What is the frequency range of electrotactile stimulation?

I have been trying to find out what the (human) electrotactile frequency range is. Since this is a much more experimental method (and more unpleasant) than the traditional vibrotactile method, the ...
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Neurogensis in CNS invloves apoptosis of scar cells?

Say there's neurogensis in a brain area that seems to "allow" it, like the Hipocampus, Striatum, and so forth. Does this neurogensis might be preceded in the apoptosis of scar cells, and then, in the ...
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Which possible methods can be used to determine if a certain part of the brain is active?

The question goes back to this tweet: Julia‏ @JuliaHass I just learned that elephants think humans are cute the way humans think puppies are cute (the same part of the brain lights up when ...
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Does the brain's architecture change while growing up?

If we are somehow able to record and store all the neural connection in the brain of a child and also the brain of the same individual when he is old will there be difference between the two ? Is the ...
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Can non-spiking neurons have a sustained synaptic output current?

I'm trying to better understand neural models, specifically non-spiking neurons in invertebrate motor control circuits. I know that a spiking neuron produces spikes in membrane potential that rapidly ...
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Are inhibitory synapses governed by different chemicals than excitatory synapses?

If a neuron has both excitatory and inhibitory chemical synapses providing it with input, is it true in all organisms that the chemicals that cause the inhibition are distinct from those that cause ...
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Why our brain can't fool itself to constantly produce dopamine?

There are experiments [1] showing that our brain tries to maximize amount of dopamine. At the same time it is the brain who controls the dopamine level, because the reward system is located in the ...
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What electrical stimuli do brain implants use?

I was reading about artificial eyes and came to think about how the brain works. More specifically, what "signals" it uses in the case of cortical visual prosthetics in blind people? Cortical ...
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What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

I would like to know what the time scale is of the human ear. I mean, what is the shortest duration of a sound that a human ear can notice and what is the longest duration of a sound that a human ear ...
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What are the definitions of 'multi-channel coding' and 'opponent channel coding'?

I am looking for the definitions of Multi-channel coding Opponent-channel coding And specifically in the context of visual adaptation. I have searched for information on the web and in books, but ...
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Ligand-gated ion channels as operators

Isn't there a perfect analogy between ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels considered (mathematically) as (non-linear) operators, mapping one function (of time) to another one? Voltage-gated ...
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96 views

What is the cause of differences that are too small to see?

Consider two identical pieces of paper. Scenario 1: On both something is drawn in black ink. If the difference between the areas covered in black ink is sufficiently small, I cannot see the ...
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Is there a waterfall visual after-effect with discrete inputs?

If you watch a waterfall for several seconds and then suddenly change your gaze to a fixed object it appears to briefly move upward. But if instead you're looking at a scrolling LED marquee sign, ...
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Effect of plateau in BTSP

In "Behavioral time scale synaptic plasticity underlies CA1 place fields" by Bittner et al. an alternative to Hebbian plasticity is proposed called Behavioral Time-scale Synaptic Plasticity (BTSP). ...
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Voltage-dependent ion channels as operators

Does it make sense (or is even the standard approach) to model mathematically a voltage-dependent ion channel not as a function, that maps a voltage to a conductance ($f:\mathbb{R}\rightarrow \mathbb{...
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Spike-timing-dependent plasticity versus Homeostatic plasticity

How can spike-timing-dependent plasticity and homeostatic plasticity both be right? If spike-timing-dependent plasticity consistently tries to strengthen connections, but homeostatic plasticity ...
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What are the names of the white matter tracts in the cortico-ventral basal ganglia circuit?

I am looking at diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. The data is clustered by regions of interest (ROIs). The clusters have locations with names, which I have listed below. Which location names ...
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Does increased neural complexity slows down brain operation speeds?

If a sensory input is perceived, one needs to process this input from the sensory end organ (sensation) up to the brain (perception). Does a more more complex neural network consume more time than a ...