Questions tagged [neurophysiology]

The study of the physiology of the nervous system, with emphasis on transcellular communication, and cellular and molecular processes involved in neural communication.

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Surface area in the classic Hodgkin Huxley Model

How can I vary the membrane surface in the classic HH model? I have programmed such a model and now I ask myself how I can change the surface of the compartment, so which parameters I have to increase ...
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Has anyone tried using functional near-infrared spectropathy to quantitively measure sodium concentrations in the brain?

Functional near-infrared spectropathy "fNIRS", is a biophysics/medical technique that uses the near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum (around 680nm to 810nm in wavelength) to ...
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What is the medullary bulb transition?

Does "medullary bulb transition" make sense in neuroanatomy internattionally or is it a Brazilian invention and there is no term like that in English? What is then the difference of the &...
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Interpreting FURA depolarization/calcium assay

I did a depolarization experiment that compared a mock-treated cell line with a treated line. One part of the results are easy to interpret: Treatment resulted in lower 350/380 ratios along the length ...
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What is the size, volume, dimensions etc. of the central lateral nucleus in the anterior intralaminar thalamus in humans?

I have been searching extensively on the internet and journal articles for the size, volume, dimensions, etc. of the central lateral nucleus in the anterior intralaminar thalamus in humans but have ...
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What has changed in your brain after electroconvulsive “therapy” (ECT)?

From this Wikipedia article: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), formerly known as electroshock therapy, is a psychiatric treatment in which seizures in the brain (without muscular convulsions) are ...
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How does the brain amplify signals without interfering with pattern recognition?

Signals in the brain normally excite neurons only if they are well known, i. e. because synapses pass them on that grew during learning. But even for well-known patterns I could imagine that without ...
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Is there a mechanical/vibrational communication method between pre- and post-synaptic terminals in addition to chemical and electrical synapses?

I recall hearing something about there being a mechanical way that two neurons can communicate with each other in addition to the chemical and electrical synapse methods. Something about a certain ...
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What degree of control do we have on eye movements?

When something "new" and "interesting" enters our visual field it can usually happen that our eyes move toward the new target. How "intentional" and "controllable&...
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Can Neuralink really be used for memory implantation?

I think you heard about a company called Elon Musk Neuralinnk. The ultimate goal of Neuralink is to achieve human memory implantation. Doctors were prepared to implant the first bionic eye in a human....
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What is the neuroscience behind copying dialect?

So everybody raised in the same area speaks with the same dialect, why is it so? What is the neuroscience behind this phenomenon?
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Can two neurons stimulate each other?

Is it possible that two neurons stimulate each other in an everlasting two neuron circuit?
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What does it mean if you are in a sleeping state and you hear a sound that your brain is immediately aware of?

When you are in a sleeping state ,i.e.lying in bed before your alarm clock rings, and you hear a noise or a voice that is not too loud and is not continuous but impulsive, and your brain immediately ...
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Neuron specialization in the Visual System

Can someone point me to a good resource to explain how neurons in the visual system become sensitive to visual features? I understand that specific neurons fire for things like direction of motion, ...
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Is there any justification for viewing neurons as self-interested agents?

There are aspects of cognition that are vaguely reminiscent of markets within an economy. For example, there is specialization as well as integration within both brains and economies. One of the ...
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Are there synapses on other neuron terminals in human brain like in Aplysia

I am referring to Eric Kandel and his experiment on Aplysia where he shows that synapses between a pair of neurons can be modulated by means of a third neuron that synapses onto the terminals of the ...
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How a signal is generated by the brain when we want to move a body [duplicate]

I've read tons of articles about how moving our bodies is going on. BUT I've found some part of topic just IGNORED. ALL authors just pass the part "our brain generates the signal". I have been trying ...
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Surgical implications of a fallacy in infering histology and morphology through a 1.5 Tesla MRI of a brainstem tumor

What would the surgical implications of a fallacy in infering histology and morphology of a brainstem tumour be? I am interested mainly in the sequelae in the sensory, motor and cognitive functions. ...
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Minimum constant neuron firing rate

Please forgive what may be an elementary question for many of you. I am trying to understand the range of firing rates in an idealized neuron. I understand what governs the maximum firing rate of a ...
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Is there a way that an infection could target a specific area of the brain?

My question is in regards to a fungal infection, but I am open to learning about viral or bacterial infections. That being said, is it possible that a fungus/virus/etc could target a specific area of ...
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Where to find information regarding the effect of ion concentration in the brain on behaviour?

Hopefully this is the right area. but for some background, for a school project I'm currently trying to design a medically accurate zombie. I have half a semesters knowledge of basic physiology, and ...
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How does the body respond to having excess levels of neuronal, not synaptic, serotonin?

If a person consumes large amounts of 5-HTP or SAM-e resulting in elevated serotonin levels in their synaptic vesicles, how is this excess offloaded? What is the average rate of clearance? All the ...
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Does thinking or focusing on something alter a neuron's speed?

I Googled about this but couldn't find any thing precise to be that does thinking about something hard alters the speed of neurons impulses? I have heard of neurons velocity being variable but want to ...
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Functional vs. synaptic connectivity

I used to believe that connectivity is nothing but synaptic connectivity and thus a long-term concept: synapses grow and synaptic strengths change on rather large time scales. But recently I found ...
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Neurotransmitters by neuron types

I'm looking for a concise overview table of all types of neurons (whose number is at least in the hundreds) indicating which neurotransmitters they use pre- and post-synaptically (of which there are ...
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Myelin and Myelin Sheath

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002261.htm Why is Myelin used as a term to mean the Myelin Sheath as opposed to the proper term? It is apparent to me that Myelin is the substance itself ...
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Understanding the 'Wiring Catastrophe'

Introduction: In 'Wiring optimization in the brain'(2000), Dmitri Chklovskii and Charles Stevens analyse the dependence of the complexity of cortical circuits on the number of synapses per neuron ...
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What's the pathfinding algorithm the human brain uses?

I was trying to build a software simulation of people using different pathways in a city to get from point A to point B. I do know the Dijkstra's algorithm and the A* algorithm, but what they do is to ...
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Can signals from the prefrontal cortex alone trigger a readiness potential in the pre-supplementary motor area?

Background In Haggard, Patrick. "Human volition: towards a neuroscience of will." Nature Reviews Neuroscience 9.12 (2008): 934., the author states in the caption of Figure 1 (pg. 4): The ...
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When does the brain stem appear in humans?

When does the brain stem appear in humans? The following article states: Once the neural tube closes, at around week 6 or week 7 of pregnancy, it curves and bulges into three sections, commonly ...
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Why is median motor nerve conduction velocity about 50 m/s?

I recently started reading Fitzgerald's clinical neuroanatomy and neuroscience (Mtui, et al. 2015) and reached chapter 12, electrodiagnostic examination, yesterday. The chapter deals, i.a., with nerve ...
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What are the neuroscience research findings on the importance of breaks in cognitive function and specifically learning?

When I say breaks I mean breaks between periods of the same course, breaks between two distinct courses, single days of, weekends, couple days of, few days of, longer periods of holidays of duration ...
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What constitutes an emotional disorder?

Watson, et al. (2008) states that a superclass of mood and anxiety disorders should be given a nonspecific label, such as ‘emotional disorders’. They stated that this superclass can be decomposed ...
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What's the difference between the neuroendocrine system vs endocrine system?

No one in the Biology site seems to be answering this, so I thought I'd post it here as a last resort. I would really appreciate if you guys can take a look at it. This is what I have understood so ...
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Can the brain be enhanced by adding more neurons?

I was wondering of ways to enhance the brain. Couldn't we add a sort of substance to improve the brain? Will it somehow adapt? The brain should 'wire up' the new substance to the existing one. As ...
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Are neural adaptation and drug tolerance to psychoactive drugs related?

Neural adaptation is "...a change over time in the responsiveness of the sensory system to a constant stimulus". The example given is placing your hand on the surface of a table. Eventually, you no ...
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Do neurons involved in reflex movements process information or they just transmit a signal?

According to Reflex A reflex, or reflex action, is an involuntary and nearly instantaneous movement in response to a stimulus. A reflex is made possible by neural pathways called reflex arcs which ...
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Can a device create/guide neuron connections between them?

Is there a device of some sort that could promote/guide/create exact connections between neurons? I wish there was a device that could get me PhD by just wearing it for a few months.
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Integrated Information Theory - If correct could humans create artificial consciousness?

First off please keep in mind I am self-learning and am learning about this for fun, I have no end goal. I'm trying to make predictions about what I am learning implies or means, so I can ask better ...
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Are there animals with only excitatory neurons?

Are there animals with only excitatory neurons? I am not sure it is possible. Also, maybe excitation/inhibition can become relative? I however will be happy to read your opinion.. For example, are ...
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What is the difference between principal neurons and pyramidal cells?

I am reading Kandel's "Principals of Neural Sciences". There the book sometimes refers to excitatory neurons as principal cells, and sometimes as pyramidal cells. Can anyone tell me the difference? ...
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Unilateral vision in split brain subjects

I am just beginning to learn psychology and came across concept of split brain. I was wondering if a person has only left eye working and has their corpus callosum cut, would they be effectively blind ...
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How does caffeine work as an analgesic adjuvant?

Caffeine is used an adjuvant in over-the-couner pain medication, e.g. added to paracetamol and/or aspirin. A brief look at the Wikipedia page on caffeine doesn't indicate any analgesic effect of ...
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How are tactile pleasure and pain differentiated in the somatosensory cortex?

A recent question here asked about (mostly) how pain and pleasure are differentiated in pathways involving reward/aversion cues. But there was some confusion as to what the question really wanted to ...
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Is there a region of the brain that mediates pain in a manner reminiscent of the mesolimbic pathway?

The mesolimbic dopamine pathway is a common neural pathway upon which rewards converge AKA the pleasure pathway. So I am trying to find a comparable pathway in the brain for pain -- is there such a ...
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Will studying formal logic improves logical reasoning?

Reason for asking question: I am looking to see if there is any good empirical evidence or study that shows or suggests that studying former logic or maybe informal logic would actually improve ...
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Is Dr. Russo’s “endocannabinoid deficiency” a valid theory?

There was a study published in Neuro Endocrinology Letters by Dr. Ethan Russo in 2004 that says many diseases being treated with cannabis correlate with an “endocannabinoid deficiency”, but I cannot ...
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Frissons on demand

Have you ever listened to music and it gives you "chills?" This response is called a "frisson," a french word meaning "to shiver." When I want to access certain emotional and inspirationally charged ...
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Performance of a damaged brain

I have heard stories/reports that if a certain part of the brain (taking care of certain functions) is damaged other parts take over the function of the damaged part. Intuitively this could mean 2 ...
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Does anybody know a source having multi-electrode (several channels) recorded data of multiple Neurons (I prefer real data not artificial)?

I mean recorded data of multiple Neurons with multi-electrode. I need this data as the input for my experiment.