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Questions tagged [neurology]

For questions related to the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems. For abnormalities of the mind consider the tags abnormal-psychology and psychiatry.

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Where exactly do Emotions and Feelings arise in the human body?

Traditionally, the heart region was always associated with emotions and feelings in humans. But in one recent philosophy lecture I watched on Youtube, the orator said that the right brain is, in fact, ...
Prahlad Yeri's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Do spinal and peripheral nerves associate with hebbian learning?

For instance, if a musician frequently makes a series of actions, neurons that are involved in such sequence should also associate inside the spine - according to "neurons that fire together wire ...
Oskar Zdrojewski's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
268 views

In technologically advanced countries, do most autistic adults not know they are autistic?

I understand this is not an easy question to address. There are differences between the terms autism and Aspergers both in public perception and in the professional world, and it's a continuum or ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 473
3 votes
1 answer
330 views

How is sexual arousal different in men and women?

I was watching ASAPScience video on the Male vs Female Orgasms. At 1:45 they say that PET scans of brain show that arousal of men and women are different. How exactly are these different, as in what ...
Profile name's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
67 views

Why actual happy experiences don't have some side effects like stimulant drugs?

Science says that the mental side effects of stimulant drugs, like depression, are caused due to the overload of dopaminergic activity in the brain, but when people experience actual great things the ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Does the sensation of pain arise in the brain? [duplicate]

I can feel pain in my arm or in my brain. I have read that you can feel a phantom pain. As if the pain exists outside the body. There is a related process in the brain but the feeling itself seems to ...
Deschele Schilder's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
25 views

Deaddiction and neural plasticity in case of the elderly

It is known that prolonged nicotine use alters the brain's connectivity. Nicotine exerts its neurophysiologic action principally through the brain’s reward center.2 Neuroadaptation develops with ...
ahron's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
50 views

Why both hypokinetic and hyperkinetic changes are seen in Parkinsons?

In Parkinsons disorder the substanstia nigra pars compacta get affected and there is destruction of the dopaminergic neurons, which ultimately disturbs the direct and indirect pathways. Now we know ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
131 views

How to distinguish mental illness and neurodevelopmental disorders?

It looks like mental illness and neurodevelopmental disorders may look absolutely same if we superficially observe the behaviour. Example: Anger, destructive behaviour can be either due to a mental ...
user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
70 views

What is the medullary bulb transition?

Does "medullary bulb transition" make sense in neuroanatomy internattionally or is it a Brazilian invention and there is no term like that in English? What is then the difference of the &...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
22 views

Function of the Left Medial Prefrontal Cortex

I am searching for a specific (as specific as is currently known) region of the brain that has a known(?) large role in deductive and inductive reasoning. My research has narrowed me down to the Left ...
Mardymar's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
83 views

What is the scientific evaluation of the Grain Brain hypothesis?

The Grain Brain hypothesis states that the consumption of gluten (and grains in general) produce long-term neurological damage. It's been proposed and popularised by neurologist and best-selling ...
luchonacho's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
99 views

Is there a neurological difference between someone experiencing a "normal" trauma response, and someone with PTSD? Or are they on the same continuum?

I've been reading Dr. Bessel van der Kolk's book The Body Keeps the Score. Dr. Van der Kolk describes how, in people with PTSD, the brain actually undergoes changes in response to trauma. Their ...
infinite-soup's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

How firing of neurons stimulate reality? [duplicate]

Iam just an enthusiast.When I look for how does our brain works it boils down to firing of neurons in a pattern. I read that all of our thoughts, memory is due to firing of networks of neurons in a ...
user42757's user avatar
  • 111
4 votes
2 answers
913 views

Inability to associate a face with a name

I know there is a medical condition called "Prosopagnosia" that is described as: a cognitive disorder of face perception in which the ability to recognize familiar faces, including one's own face (...
Ælis's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
525 views

How do you denoise and extract features from EEG data with Python?

I have EEG data with 5 columns (1 per each electrode) and I need to denoise it and extract features from it using Python. I tried to find relevant packages but my search kept leading me to MNE which ...
Mayu's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
190 views

Can a person with delusions completely acknowledge their delusions

I wanted to ask a question for a story I'm writing; Can a person with delusions completely acknowledge that they have delusions? For example, if someone claims that for a long time he believed ...
noam b's user avatar
  • 111
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

Are scintillating scotomas really caused by cortical spreading depression? If so, how is this known to be true?

I have just read about a visual effect called a scintillating scotoma. Many variations occur, but scintillating scotoma usually begins as a spot of flickering light near or in the center of the ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 473
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

Nociceptor (possible threat signal)

I've read this on Wikipedia: A nociceptor is a sensory neuron that responds to damaging or potentially damaging stimuli by sending “possible threat” signals to the spinal cord and the brain. ...
Ashraf Benmebarek's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Can a CT scan have advserse cognitive effects on the brain? [closed]

If the normal Xrays scans, despite the low amount of radiation (equivalent to a few hours of background radiation, can be sufficient to cause a burning sensation, then I wonder if the much higher dose ...
Bastien Altorg's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
87 views

The brain physically changes with regular coffee consumption, but at what rate does it return to normal?

Question We know adenosine receptors A1 & A2 subtypes physically increase in the basal ganglia with prolonged caffeine exposure over the period of about 1-2 weeks, but at what rate do they return ...
Jonathan's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
36 views

What are the thoughts? [duplicate]

At the neuroscience level, what are thoughts? I mean, are they just electrical synapse through the brain in a recognizable patterns? if so, How are those electrical pulses originated?
Ivanovitch's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
540 views

Is it possible to develop dementia by eating bone marrow?

A psychiatrist once told me to avoid eating bone marrow because it could contain prions that could cause dementia. However, I haven't been able to find any studies that confirm this. Could this happen?...
Hlkwtz's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
1 answer
285 views

Which possible methods can be used to determine if a certain part of the brain is active?

The question goes back to this tweet: Julia‏ @JuliaHass I just learned that elephants think humans are cute the way humans think puppies are cute (the same part of the brain lights up when they see ...
jjack's user avatar
  • 145
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

Human trials for stentrode neural recordings

Neural recording via a stentrode seems to be next big thing in neuroscience. It can be used to treat disabilities, brain disorders and enable brain to brain communications. Are human trials being done ...
uil's user avatar
  • 11
5 votes
1 answer
191 views

Why can't hemineglect patients be trained to actively pay attention to their neglected side?

I'm still having a hard time understanding the symptoms of hemineglect, mainly because perception and attention has been two peas of a pod for most of my experiences. A Scholarpedia article states ...
Kenny Kim's user avatar
  • 368
3 votes
0 answers
63 views

Do we know what is happening inside the brain when a person is hit in the head?

For the purposes of this question, I will use the example of a legally sanctioned athletic contest (i.e., a boxing match), rather than criminal activity or accidents, but the question certainly ...
Wad Cheber's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
4k views

What is the effect of Binaural Beats on an Autistic brain?

I understand a fare bit about autism, and Binaural Beats. Autism is the result of synaptic pathways becoming malformed during the fetal stage of pregnancy. A Binaural Beat is a collection of two ...
Neo One's user avatar
  • 49
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Do some people possess more or more active mirror neurons than others?

Some people love watching people get hurt, they may find it humorous. Some people don't really like it but can watch it. Some, however, find it unbearable to watch. Why is this? Are the latter of the ...
Matt's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

"top-down" and "bottom-up" processes

What kind of processes are "top-down" and "bottom-up" processes in the context of processing visual information in brain? Context: ...There are discrete areas in the visual cortex dedicated to ...
user9258's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
11k views

Why would I be asked to count backwards by 3, from 100 in a psychological test?

On an initial mental health consultation with a psychiatric nurse practitioner, I was asked, among many other odd questions, to count backwards by three. 100, 97, 94... This was quite a number of ...
knivez's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
34 views

image of eyes to brain [duplicate]

If the eyes image is upside down before brain processes it, then do that mean an alzeiheimers patient in end stage see images upside down at all time because of a deteriorating brain?
betty's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
1 answer
427 views

How does Parkinson's disease result in tremors?

From what I understand, Parkinson's disease is caused by the death of dopamine producing cells in the substantia nigra, however I don't understand how that causses the symptoms of Parkinson's. I am ...
Meep's user avatar
  • 425
11 votes
3 answers
491 views

Which area of the brain was first correctly associated with a specific function?

I have read on this website that Broca's area was the first area of the brain to be associated correctly with a specific function, in that case language. But I couldn't find any other source for the ...
MagTun's user avatar
  • 321
2 votes
0 answers
147 views

Dearth of research on treating Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) with Baclofen

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6721446 The above study from 1984 at Stanford found that oral administration of baclofen somewhat improved sleep in patients with PLM-associated arousals. The ...
Simon's user avatar
  • 121
6 votes
2 answers
6k views

How are the logical and mathematical skills of people with ADHD?

How does rationality and the logical thought processes of those with and without ADHD compare? Please explain the source of the differences. Are the differences thought to be caused by dopamine, ...
Cogfi's user avatar
  • 199
4 votes
0 answers
82 views

Neuropharmacology and Simulation [closed]

I've been wondering whether neural simulations have had applications in (cognitive)neuropharmacological research already. One always reads about the promise of the technology in helping us cure ...
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
88 views

How actively does your brain physically prune connections?

Is pruning defined as neural apoptosis or are connections (neural synapses) simply separated? At what rate, if known, does this occur in individuals (ages 18+)?
CharlesChanLee's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
111 views

Can repetitive sports-related head injuries make a person senile many years later?

Would repetitive football injuries to the cranium show up decades later, causing symptoms resembling mild retardation, OCD, etc.? What is the best way to determine this in terms of imaging, testing, ...
Cbaker510's user avatar
  • 203
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Difference between brain disease and brain disorder

Is there any difference between the terms brain disease and brain disorder? They are often used in combination without ...
John Manak's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Are there any systems in the brain that are responsible for monitoring energy

For example, the amount of energy that is available for the brain to use, or the amount that the brain consumes with respect to time?
JackLaurence's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
148 views

How does excess of dopamine affect one's mental health?

If a person takes dopamine increasing medication for some illness, what effect will it have on his/her mental health considering that medication doesn't target just one area of the brain ? In ...
DetectiveShmee's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
111 views

Why would someone seek treatment for Apraxia of speech?

People with Apraxia of speech have two basic problems: monotone pronunciation and slow speech. (1) Might someone with Apraxia of speech who does not seek treatment have psychological problems? They ...
shinmai_psb's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
115 views

Is there any treatment for cognitive difficulties of patients with Parkinson's disease?

I've read some articles and science papers about Parkinson's disease and found out that many patients often have cognitive difficulties, if not all of them. For memory difficulty, medications to treat ...
DetectiveShmee's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
142 views

What are the effects of antipsychotic medication on brain volume?

I have read numerous different papers each claiming that antipsychotic medication either helps maintain brain volume or causes brain volume reduction in patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic ...
Cromulent's user avatar
  • 165
2 votes
1 answer
124 views

Neuroscience student [closed]

I'm thinking about studying neuroscience, but the only interests I have in the general area are: Where thought or consciousness come from and how it all works How memory works and why it can't be ...
user4410's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
113 views

How to enhance brain functioning through neurological stimulation? [closed]

Many emotional and behavioral dysfunctions, such as bad decision-making (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awg177), appear to be symptoms of impaired brain functioning. Conversely, stimulating brain ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
7k views

What is the neurological basis for 'daredevil' behaviour?

What is the neurological basis for people being seemingly fearless and engaging in risk-taking and daredevil behaviour? I am talking about those that frequently perform or participate in activities ...
user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
58 views

Derived knowledge from periodicity of harmonic motion?

This question is the third in a series, after: 1. Improved Typing as a result of slight movement 2. Neural Processes of Inducing Flow Background: Pseudo-random, 'swaying', motion appears to ...
BenCole's user avatar
  • 1,603
6 votes
1 answer
130 views

Neural Processes of Inducing Flow

Related to my previous question: Improved Typing as a result of slight movement For context: slight movement (<1 inch in any direction) improves typing, piano-playing, and writing, among other ...
BenCole's user avatar
  • 1,603