Questions tagged [neuroanatomy]

For questions regarding specific structures in the central and peripheral nervous systems

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
1 answer
49 views

Research and theories related to the physical form of Cognitive Fallacies

Is there any research about what physically happens inside our brain anatomically and neurologically when we humans commit cognitive fallacies (especially those fallacies documented in the book of ...
Piinhuann Chew's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

What decides which pathway-forming neurons relate to a given thought or behavior? [duplicate]

So I know pathways of neuron connections are what store or “activate” behaviors, memories, information, etc and relate to specific thoughts and other brain functions occurring, and that when we learn ...
inkwell87's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Cranial nerve ganglion, or Cranial nerve nucleus?

I have a question that I hope some of you may be able to clarify for me. I have been taught that dorsal root ganglia are analogous to cranial nerve ganglia except that dorsal root ganglion is located ...
TheMatureNeuro's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Mesolimbic pathway

I am trying to gain a better understanding of the etymology of terms used in neuroscience as that helps me remember things. In this case I am trying to understand the phrase "mesolimbic pathway&...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
285 views

Why are there receptors inside neural cells?

Reading a recent article which argues on why psychedelic substances are more effective than the naturally occurring neurotransmitters in the brain: *Breakthrough study discovers that psychedelics ...
Evamentality's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
17 views

Question about How to assign the order of vertices of a pial surface in FreeSurfer

I'm a CIVET user but I recently started to use FreeSurfer. As far as I know, for a surface from CIVET, its vertices are ordered by upsampling a polygon. So I could access downsampled surface by ...
yanghee Im's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
172 views

Are there any sources that estimate the number of *unique* direct connections between neurons?

There are plenty of sources on the number of synapses the average neuron in some region of the brain has. However, its become clear that there is some degree of redundancy in these connections, where ...
user45681's user avatar
  • 141
2 votes
0 answers
105 views

Is the hippocampus subcortical?

There is a little debate going on in my lab about whether or not the hippocampus is a subcortical structure. There are points made on both sides, and primary and secondary sources do not seem to form ...
erf x's user avatar
  • 21
3 votes
1 answer
82 views

Can you grow a small brain network in a petri dish?

Perhaps with stem cells, genetic engineering like CRISPR, or just cellular extraction and harvesting/reproduction in some way, we could isolate and incubate a single neuron in an artificial ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
649 views

Why do some people have better memories than others?

Some people have great memories. Some people have horrible memories. There are even people with hyperthymesia who remember everything. I was told that anybody can have a good memory if they practice ...
Max's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
1 answer
163 views

How do the outer hair cells amplify the traveling wave?

Depending on the movement frequency, outer hair cells can stretch and contract, amplifying the amplitude of the traveling wave at the basilar membrane. How can they do this exactly? what is the point ...
Math_Man1's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
326 views

Deflection of the basilar membrane

The basilar membrane becomes thicker and heavier from the basal end to the apical upper end - this is why high frequencies are perceived in the lower range and low frequencies in the upper range. But ...
Math_Man1's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
59 views

Do induced brain wave patterns give the same cognitive and perceptual consequences as those that arise naturally? [duplicate]

What I mean to ask by this particular question is that, are the effects resulting from neural interactions in the brain that cause the emergence of certain behaviours, with the neural frequencies in ...
C-Consciousness's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
287 views

What is the cochlear frequency response by number of hair cells?

I am trying to recreate the cochlea/basilar membrane response to sound and want to know how the hair cells are bucketed or binned by frequency, so an ideal list would be something like 10 kHz - 12 kHz:...
Keno's user avatar
  • 597
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

What is the size limit of molecules entering the intracellular sections of a neuron?

As voltage sensitive organic dyes enter the inside of neurons and quantum dots are seeking to replace these due to their higher quantum yield, I was wondering what the seize limit is, as quantum dot ...
C-Consciousness's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Are there equivalent calcium imaging molecules that fluoresce in the presence of neurotransmitters between axons?

Molecules like GCaMP fluoresce when calcium ions attach to them. I was wondering if this can work with the other neurotransmitters in the brain or compounds that transmit signals outside of neurons.
C-Consciousness's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
4k views

What are higher-level and lower-level brain functions?

The human brain can be described as a "Russian nesting doll" in the sense that the most ancient areas of the brain responsible for lower functions are located at its centre while newer ...
Prithvi Ramrucha's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
11 views

Is there an upper bound on signals ascending from the sensory nerves through the medulla?

I'm starting to go down a research path related to haptic and embodied cognition. Though I haven't taken a deep dive into neuroanatomy (only a 300 level undergrad cognitive neuroscience course's worth ...
instroyer's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

What is the scope of the study of Neuroanatomy?

I am now trying to understand the scope of the study of neuroanatomy as the discussion in meta surrounding the question Dorsum sellae, tuberculum sellae and sella turcica which of the 3 is referred to ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.2k
3 votes
0 answers
65 views

What is the medullary bulb transition?

Does "medullary bulb transition" make sense in neuroanatomy internattionally or is it a Brazilian invention and there is no term like that in English? What is then the difference of the &...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
15 views

What is the size, volume, dimensions etc. of the central lateral nucleus in the anterior intralaminar thalamus in humans?

I have been searching extensively on the internet and journal articles for the size, volume, dimensions, etc. of the central lateral nucleus in the anterior intralaminar thalamus in humans but have ...
Tsvetoslav Ivanov's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
65 views

Can two neurons stimulate each other?

Is it possible that two neurons stimulate each other in an everlasting two neuron circuit?
WinnieThePooh's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
32 views

What effect does the size of the soma have on firing characteristics?

For example, cells in layer 5 of the neocortex have a larger soma than do other layers. I'm wondering what the functional difference is between smaller and larger soma. On one hand, I can imagine that ...
acbluedu's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

How a signal is generated by the brain when we want to move a body [duplicate]

I've read tons of articles about how moving our bodies is going on. BUT I've found some part of topic just IGNORED. ALL authors just pass the part "our brain generates the signal". I have been trying ...
Andriy's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Consistent neuroanatomy coordinates naming

I'm studying brain anatomy but I find coordinates systems are not consistent among books, lecture notes and internet. There are 3 plane directions horizontal coronal sagittal And 6 directions ...
CoffeDeveloper's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Principles of grouping neurons

This is an overview question. I wonder which principles of grouping neurons into higher units are there, and which principles I have overseen. neurotransmitter systems: all neurons that release or ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
320 views

How many different synapses can an axon form? How do they differ?

It is estimated that the in the human brain there are about 100 billion neurons. With thousands of synapses for each of them, the total number of synapses is over 100 trillion. Yet each neuron has ...
Patuccio's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is the approximation of the Medial Frontal Gyrus in the region of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex?

I'm wondering if the MFG is located in the region considered the DLPFC?
TomD's user avatar
  • 23
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Meaning of "projection" and "to project" in neuroscience

What is the exact meaning of the term projection and the verb to project in neuroscience? I haven't found any neuroscience reference book or dictionary that gives a definition, although those terms ...
pglpm's user avatar
  • 113
1 vote
0 answers
128 views

Decussation of Cranial Nerves

Which cranial nerves decussate apart from the few nerve fibers of the optic nerve that do and how to easilly remember the cranial nerves that do? Here is a paper for the Trochlear Nerve But I have ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
66 views

Cingulate cortex vs Limbic lobe are they same or slightly different?

I've read the wikipedia article on Cingulate cortex and the article about limbic lobe. Also did web search but it is not clear to me whether they are synonymous or there are slight differences in the ...
user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
551 views

Supplementary Motor Area or Juxtapositional Lobule Cortex

Harvard-Oxford Cortical Structural Atlas now calls the 'Supplementary Motor Area' the 'Juxtapositional Lobule Cortex (formerly Supplementary Motor Cortex)'. I've looked for papers that explain the ...
PCS's user avatar
  • 153
2 votes
1 answer
133 views

Myelin and Myelin Sheath

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002261.htm Why is Myelin used as a term to mean the Myelin Sheath as opposed to the proper term? It is apparent to me that Myelin is the substance itself ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
48 views

How synapses are hold in place if they're not phisically attached?

When two neurons connect to form a synapse, between the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic cells some space is found (synaptic cleft). How does this keep in position if there is no physical connection ...
Mattia's user avatar
  • 107
1 vote
0 answers
68 views

Upside down, backwards writing [closed]

I am an older adult, who entered college late in life. I came to find out that I have both Dyscalculia, and Dyslexia (formally diagnosed) through great difficulty in college. Not realizing that I had ...
Suzan Clark's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

Using neuroscience to study a new organism [closed]

Consider a situation where you discover a new species and of organism. Using research methods of neuroscience or otherwise, how would you go about analyzing the nervous system and the brain of this ...
IonicGolem36's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
5k views

What's the difference between the neuroendocrine system vs endocrine system?

No one in the Biology site seems to be answering this, so I thought I'd post it here as a last resort. I would really appreciate if you guys can take a look at it. This is what I have understood so ...
BlueMagic1923's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

How are ocular dominance columns monocular despite binocular complex cells?

Orientation columns in the primary visual cortex are known to have (mostly) simple cells in layers 4 and 6, and (mostly) complex cells in layers 2,3 and 5. Orientation columns spanning an entire range ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
749 views

Unilateral vision in split brain subjects

I am just beginning to learn psychology and came across concept of split brain. I was wondering if a person has only left eye working and has their corpus callosum cut, would they be effectively blind ...
Prathamesh Kulkarni's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
164 views

Is there a region of the brain that mediates pain in a manner reminiscent of the mesolimbic pathway?

The mesolimbic dopamine pathway is a common neural pathway upon which rewards converge AKA the pleasure pathway. So I am trying to find a comparable pathway in the brain for pain -- is there such a ...
faustus's user avatar
  • 1,247
4 votes
1 answer
51 views

What introductory textbook is available about the corticostriatal brain circuitry?

I want to understand the basal ganglia better. In particular, I want to understand the role of the corticostriatal brain circuitry for non-motor functions, including emotion and cognition. I have ...
user19735's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
85 views

Are cognitive functions strictly divided in the left and right hemispheres? [duplicate]

I often see this kind of picture, claiming the strict lateralization of brain functions. Is this valid? Then, what happens to left-handed individuals? Are their cognitive functions also switched ...
user4234's user avatar
  • 171
3 votes
0 answers
150 views

To what extent is face-detection achieved in peripheral vision?

I'm trying to find out to what extent mere detection of faces (i.e. determining that something is a face, as opposed to recognition of specific individuals) is favored in the central vision vs ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

Neurogensis in CNS invloves apoptosis of scar cells?

Say there's neurogensis in a brain area that seems to "allow" it, like the Hipocampus, Striatum, and so forth. Does this neurogensis might be preceded in the apoptosis of scar cells, and then, in the ...
Arcticooling's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
592 views

Calculating brain-part volume percentage?

How is the approximate volume occupied by a brain component calculated? For example, how would you know the approximate brain volume percentage of both hippocampi or both parts of the striatum, or ...
Arcticooling's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
632 views

What does 'Mean Diffusivity' tell me about the connectivity of cortical areas?

I am reading an article about changes in thalamic volume and connections in relation to age and I understand that thalamic volume decreases with age. The authors find that mean diffusivity (MD) in ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 43
1 vote
0 answers
90 views

Hypothetical working and function of grandmother cells [closed]

I wonder, if the following model of the working and function of hypothetical grandmother cells is worthy of consideration or not (or if it is even a common view, just differently stated). I assume ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
108 views

What are the names of the white matter tracts in the cortico-ventral basal ganglia circuit?

I am looking at diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. The data are clustered by regions of interest (ROIs). The clusters have locations with names, which I have listed below. Which location names ...
user90664's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
585 views

Where can I find the connectivity matrix of the connectome of C. Elegans?

I am trying to find the entire connectivity matrix for the connectome of the roundworm C. elegans. It is a much studied animal, as it features just a handful of neurons in its nervous system, 302 to ...
markagrios's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
359 views

Are all dendrites targeted by an axon, or are there a lot of "empty" dendrites?

As far as I understand, one neuron can have up to 200 000 dendrites (e.g. purkinje cells). As for axons, there can be only one per neuron, which can divide into thousands (but not hundreds of ...
Danyl Filatov's user avatar