Questions tagged [memory]

For questions about the encoding, storage, and retrieval of information in the brain. This tag encompasses research all the way from the molecular level in model organisms to abstract mathematical representations, and includes applied learning paradigms and tasks.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Memorizing a Repeating 2D Structure

Goal To be able to visualize this entire object in my mind on command. ...
cuppajoeman's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Non-salience memories? [duplicate]

It is said that memories that are significant are remembered much more clearly due to salience. Yet, let us imagine a man named Fred. Fred does not have hyperthymesia as he forgets things like ...
Max's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
0 answers
13 views

Is there any research on episodic-like memory in reptiles?

I've been studying the area of episodic-like memory in non-human animals and reptiles seems to be really underrepresented (or not represented at all). Is there any research that I am missing? Anything ...
mandra mithra's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
30 views

Which sleep stage(s) account(s) for synaptic consolidation the most?

I learnt that long-term consolidation of memories happens vastly while we are asleep, and it is accompanied by synaptic changes. But exactly which stage(s) of our sleep account for the synaptic ...
LimeAndConconut's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Does an extrovert have an advantage over an introvert on the WAIS-IV Arithmetic subtest?

I guess yes, because an extrovert gets more exposure to verbal conversation and then is more able to remember what the proctor said on the Arithmetic subtest. However, someone else said that this is ...
Xoluvium's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Roles of Brain Regions (neocortex and hippocampus) in Explicit (declarative) LTM

My question is what is the role of the hippocampus, neocortex and amygdala in the encoding, storage and retrieval of declarative (explicit) memory, specifically episodic and semantic I am sort of ...
charl2.718's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Observational Learning - Where does encoding, storage and retrieval occur?

It has been taught to me that there are 5 stages (or requirements) that enable observational learning to occur. That is, attention, retention, reproduction, motivation and reinforcement. My teachers ...
charl2.718's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

How do photos activate our memory?

Today I got a compilation of old photos automatically recommended to me by google photos. It was about a school trip that happend a few years ago. When I see the photo, I felt I could vividly remember ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
28 views

Transplant patients experiencing changes in preferences to match their donors

Similar to Where exactly do Emotions and Feelings arise in the human body?, I have been hearing of a phenomenon where transplant patients have been experiencing changes in preferences to match their ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.1k
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Replication or conceptual replication of card trick in Mind Field Ep 8?

In Mind Field S1 E8 Michael Stevens presents a magician performing a trick with participants. Each participant is shown pairs of photographs of people and are given the forced choice of which one they ...
Galen's user avatar
  • 133
1 vote
1 answer
100 views

Why can I sometimes retrive memories when not thinking actively about it but can't when actively thinking?

To speed up time my efficiency on the computer, I had started to use key bindings. These are some keys you press together and you'll directly get a desired result. One common one I use is the windows ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
79 views

Could memory storage be infinite or is it very unlikely? [duplicate]

We don’t know how memories are stored in the brain, how much “space” a memory takes up and how many neurons can be stored in one synapse. That being said- someone once said (I think it was Wired ...
Max's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
0 answers
30 views

Spider removing a piece of grass from its web -- very different behavior second time -- why?

This was an experiment I performed so no link to the event nor the scientist's interpretation which was in an old email I no longer have access to. The first time, the spider cautiously approached the ...
releseabe's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes
1 answer
93 views

Faithfully recounting the events of the day

Let us say that a person $x$ can faithfully recount day $d$ if $x$ can mention at least $2$ things she did in the first half of the day, and the same for the second half of the day. I suppose we could ...
Dominic van der Zypen's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
82 views

Pros & Cons of "Memory Palace" vs regular "Working Memory"

Hi I'm trying to understand the limitations of the techniques which "memory champions" employ, in comparison to say: working memory. Working memory seems quite limited, but it is at least ...
profPlum's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
14 views

Are there any measurement techniques to evaluate the prospective memory (PM) in laboratory?

The prospective memory (PM) term has been drawing attention since its proposed. But as far as I know, most of the research has been conducted in a real-life situation and there is no measurement ...
Burak's user avatar
  • 61
1 vote
1 answer
115 views

Equivalent term for muscle memory in the intellectual domain?

In the latest newsletter of The Batch by Andrew Ng, he wrote that: All of this leads me to think that we need an equivalent term for muscle memory in the intellectual domain. As knowledge work has ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

Is it possible for someone to not remember something, but to remember that one used to remember it?

Is it possible for someone to forgot an incident or memory, yet still remember that one used to remember it? If so, can someone give me an example?
user107952's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
76 views

Are unannounced tests unexpected by participants?

I was looking into whether unannounced (memory) tests were actually unexpected by participants, and if the benefits accredited to unannounced tests are well-founded. Considering that students are ...
rlamesch's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
18 views

Which proportion of species of non human animals exhibit a "forgetting curve" similar to that of humans?

SHORT QUESTION: Are there some experimental results supporting the existence of a "forgetting curve" in most non human animals similar to that of humans? BACKGROUND and REFERENCES: Spaced ...
J..y B..y's user avatar
  • 793
0 votes
0 answers
90 views

What is the correlation between working memory and long term memory?

(First of all, sorry if this is a silly question; this is not my discipline.) I am planning on conducting a study, and one of the things I would like to have is a sense of participants' long-term ...
mrtnsrmo's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

selective memory bias and the ideal self [closed]

Personal theory is that selective memory bias is a component of bias towards the ideal self. A person is more likely to remember those things that promote the ideal self while warping or forgetting ...
user30803's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
168 views

Is aphantasia an inability to record memories, or an inability to recall memories?

People with aphantasia are unable to voluntarily create or recall mental images. This can extend to non-visual memory too (e.g. remembering that they heard a loud bang, but not remembering the sound ...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
44 views

Why do we forget what we learnt after the completion of exams?

I have just read about this question but i forgot the name of this effect. As far as i remembered the effect was discovered and formulated by some russian scientist but i couldn't remember his name. ...
Burak's user avatar
  • 61
2 votes
0 answers
58 views

Is it possible to disassociate working memory and consciousness?

The traditional view holds that consciousness and working memory has linked tightly. But some researches have some proofs against this idea. The study said that people can reading and doing arithmetic ...
Burak's user avatar
  • 61
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Electric communication between single neurons

It is believed that neurons communicate through neurotransmitters, released from multiple synapses and flow to the axon of the next neuron. But has it been shown if a single neuron communicate with a ...
Leo B Neo's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
64 views

How do we memorize ordered lists?

We have to memorize a lot of ordered lists in life and in our education period. In chemistry, we memorize the Metal Reactivity Series and Periodic Table. Being a table tennis player myself, I can ...
Dron Bhattacharya's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
55 views

How do humans remember information?

When conversing, I often find myself using words or conveying ideas that I wasn't aware that I knew, nor whether these words/ideas were actually relevant to the conversation. It is only after googling ...
jaiyeko's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

Is memory adversely affected after you stop smoking?

An answer to Can you use harmful addictions to build good habits? points to an interesting article by Heishman et al. (2010) which points out that: Short-term episodic memory-accuracy Analysis of the ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.1k
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Why memory studies was a strong area of research during 90's?

Memory studies seemed to have flourished during nineties - particularly early nineties. Not only in Psychology, but in neuroscience, in social sciences, in History, there was a period in which a lot ...
Saturno's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

What makes a neural pathway relevant to a memory?

When a neural network is created for a certain memory, what makes that neural network relevant to the memory? In other words, what property of the neural network stimulates the retrieval of the memory?...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
114 views

How is the memory compressed when moving from the hippocampus to the PFC?

I have recently been intrigued by memory. I found that the hippocampus stores new memories. In sleep, the newly formed memories are moved to the neocortex. I was curious about how this transition ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
574 views

Why do some people have better memories than others?

Some people have great memories. Some people have horrible memories. There are even people with hyperthymesia who remember everything. I was told that anybody can have a good memory if they practice ...
Max's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
47 views

how do the neurons get stronger physically? [closed]

I wanna know about the possibility of simulating the brain state physically to know about the possibility of getting an answer for (free will or random will) vs determinism in the future. so for the ...
Farhang Amaji's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is verbal memory useful for?

A friend of mine did the Verbal Memory Test at http://humanbenchmark.com/ and got an extremely high score (almost 300 words). English is not his first language and he knew the meaning of only about ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
113 views

Does our subconscious retain more than our conscious mind does? [closed]

Such as If you read a book, yet can't recite/directly recall most of it. Is what you read stored in your subconscious or do you forget it right after you read it, or did you not retain it in the first ...
user51969's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Would you still be addicted to something if you lost your memory of being addicted to it? [duplicate]

If someone was addicted to something, it could be substances/gambling/sex etc... and then they lost their memory. It could be just losing the memory of the addiction or full blown global amnesia ...
Umayr Dawood's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
153 views

How does our brain remember reminders?

I was wondering about a rather remarkable phenomenon regarding how we recollect reminders. I've read stories where people keep a pillow, or even figures and dolls, near their door to make them ...
adibak's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
80 views

Difference in neural activity of a thought vs. a memory

I want to understand the difference in neural activity between a "thought" and a "memory impression". Is it a "thought" while the neural activity is present in working ...
VerySeriousSoftwareEndeavours's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is "belief" in folk psychology just a sub-type of memory?

In folk psychology, we talk about beliefs. For instance, you can ask someone, why did you increase your investment in the stock market? He may say, well, I believe that the stock market will likely go ...
J Li's user avatar
  • 237
2 votes
0 answers
68 views

Non-binary scores for backward digit span (BDS)

A common test of memory span is to display or utter a sequence of numbers and then request that a candidate being assessed repeat that sequence of numbers in reverse order. Typically, the candidate's ...
Rodrigo de Azevedo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Regarding a subconscious memory faculty [duplicate]

I 've been fascinated by the following technique which I read some time ago. It goes as follows: If you forget something and you can't remember it e.g. somebody's name, try with full intention and ...
Enk9456's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
267 views

Why do some memories have a closer 'feeling' in time than others?

There are some memories in my head which seems to have occured much more far away than it actually has happend, that is there is a feeling of disconnect between the actual timeline of events which has ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
300 views

Improving backward item retention

I am trying to improve my performance in auditory backward retention tests. The task consists in trying to repeat in the reverse order the longest possible series of digits after hearing a series of ...
shamalaia's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
90 views

Does nostalgia contribute to overrating past experiences?

We all have something in our lives that we are sentimental about, and even a glimpse of that object/idea can bring back happy memories. And nostalgia makes the remembrances of those experiences feel ...
user1194497's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
97 views

Is it generally accepted idea that a memory associated with strong olfactory stimuli will be kept longer?

Question: If you go to see flowers and don't smell them, is it likely that you will forget the event easier than when you do smell them? assuming all the other factors are constant. Here's the story. ...
Hoseung Choi's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
82 views

What caused psychologists to be so wrong about the size of working memory?

They used to think that the size of working memory was 7 items, on average. Now, according to fMRI, it's believed to be only 4. Source: In his TED talk, around 5:20, Peter Doolittle says the estimate ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Memory Retention of [submininal] information

How effective is memory retention of [subliminal] information when specifically focusing your attention on a different focal point? I.e... If I attempt to retain information from a lecture by playing ...
VerySeriousSoftwareEndeavours's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
168 views

Is there a benefit for humans to lose memory access when under elongated periods of stress?

Long term anxiety causes memory loss. Sources: https://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/signs/memory-loss and https://now.uiowa.edu/2014/06/stress-hormone-linked-short-term-memory-loss-we-age Are there ...
Pascal Widmann's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
468 views

Is Orwellian Double-think Psychologically Possible?

In George Orwell's 1984, a great deal of space is devoted to explaining "Double-think," part of The Party's method of "reality control." Here's a particularly clear passage: ...
General Nuisance's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
8