Questions tagged [hearing]

For questions regarding the sensation (transduction) and perception of sound information by the brain in humans and animals

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23
votes
3answers
56k views

Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats?

When two coherent sounds with nearly similar frequencies are presented to each ear respectively with stereo headphones, the brain integrates the two signals and produces a sensation of a third sound ...
20
votes
1answer
228 views

Does self-directed speech help or hurt a blind subject's auditory recognition?

Recently, it was found that self-directed speech was helpful to sighted subjects engaging in a visual search task: Participants searched for common objects, while being sometimes [sic] asked to ...
18
votes
1answer
3k views

Do people wake up faster with inconsistent alarm sounds?

Many people have one alarm clock sound that wakes them up every morning. Is having this consistent sound the optimal way to wake someone up? Or can you startle someone faster by changing to a ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

How do we hear our inner voice?

How do we perceive inner speech? Does it follow the same neural pathways as normal acoustic speech? If yes, what is the extent of overlap between the two neural pathways?
11
votes
2answers
270 views

How is tone volume encoded?

I am wondering whether increasing the volume would result in (a) a neuron that was already firing to now increase its spike rate, (b) a different group of neurons to add their activity to the ...
10
votes
2answers
832 views

Long term effect of using noise generators

Some people use noise generators as http://playnoise.com/ to reduce distraction by background noise. Is there any research on the long term effects of this? Does this affect the neuronal connections ...
9
votes
1answer
4k views

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Different areas of the inner ear (the cochlea) are sensitive to different acoustic frequencies. Hence, the cochlea basically performs a fast Fourier transform on the audio signal. This spectral ...
8
votes
2answers
532 views

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

I presume that deafness is the inability of hearing any sounds. And I presume that it may also be possible to be less able to decode sounds. In other words, an inability to translate or understand the ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do people tap their foot to music?

When listening to music, I often see people tap their feet either to the main beat or the dominating rhythm of the music. Why do people do this?
7
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the frequency of the ringing in my ear?

I have ringing in my ears that has become constant over time. Most of the time I just ignore it, to tell you the truth I can't even remember when it started. Lately I'm curious what the frequency of ...
7
votes
3answers
289 views

How does the brain compute sound localisation without the equations?

What sort of computations are used for localising sound with the ears, and how does the brain compute the time difference between sounds reaching each ear? I am interested in the specific mechanisms ...
7
votes
3answers
578 views

Which is the shortest duration for a pitch difference in audio signals to be perceived by the human auditory system?

If I have two short audio signals, for example pure tone C4 and C#4, so half-tone difference, how short can they be that the human can hear the difference in pitch? Was there any blind-experiment/...
7
votes
1answer
529 views

Psychology of timbre processing

Are there any studies concerning the psychological aspects of timbre processing in the brain, e.g. while listening to music? In particular, can any lower-level correlates be discerned when trying to ...
7
votes
1answer
149 views

Increasing pitch perception of the same auditory stimuli

I was trying to work up a small clip of repeating beep sounds I recorded from a mobile game. This series of sounds, when played, gave an unmistakable perception of increasing pitch with every ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?

When speaking, I hear my own voice very differently from how others do and from what it really is. The sound differs in tone, pitch, volume, etc. For example, recordings of my singing or speaking in ...
6
votes
2answers
325 views

How to test whether a person is Left-Eared or Right-Eared?

It is well-known that the majority of humans have left-right preferences when using their hands or feet. But it is perhaps less well-known that the same can be true for our eyes and ears. I once ...
6
votes
1answer
714 views

Does your voice pitch affect your perceived authority?

I heard a claim that people with lower voice pitch are perceived as more credible than people with higher pitch. Is there any research on this?
6
votes
1answer
314 views

What delay between two audio sources is seen as "noticeable" to most people?

I'm completing a project that involves synchronising two audio sources over a network, and I need to find some figures that represent what kind delay would be seen as "noticeable". I've tried ...
6
votes
1answer
96 views

Is mapping sound frequencies to the vertical axis universal?

Shrill notes are said to be "high", and rumbles are said to be "low". Humans seem to metaphorically map frequency to the vertical axis, and in the cultures that I know of, high frequency is ...
6
votes
1answer
164 views

How do deaf people get feedback on their speech?

When we speak, our ears give us feedback on the same. This, presumably, helps in learning a language and adjusting the volume of our speech. How do deaf people get this feedback to learn a new ...
6
votes
1answer
170 views

How to analyze auditory steady state responses?

How does one usually go about analyzing the auditory steady state response (ASSR)? I have data where speech was amplitude modulated to a 40 Hz sine tone. There's 3.5 minutes of data; should I just ...
6
votes
3answers
251 views

How does appreciation for music change over time for the same person?

I know that there's a concept of acquired taste, where a child may find certain tastes, like peppers and beer unappealing until certain age or frequency of exposure. Is there something similar to ...
5
votes
2answers
138 views

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

I would like to know what the time scale is of the human ear. I mean, what is the shortest duration of a sound that a human ear can notice and what is the longest duration of a sound that a human ear ...
5
votes
3answers
25k views

Why is the sound of running water soothing?

What is it about the sound of running water that soothes the brain and the soul? This is what I found on the internet: Our species evolved where trees met savannahs and where freshwater sources ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

How does speed listening work?

I've recently gotten into listening to podcasts. Over time, as I get accustomed to the speaker's voice, I'm able to increase the speed of the podcast to as high as 3x speed. It still feels "normal" to ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

How do congenitally deaf and mute people think?

If a person is born deaf and dumb, how can they think? In "what language" do these people think? Do they develop their own inner language? Unfortunately I have not found an answer, and I actually ...
5
votes
2answers
916 views

Can binaural beats be generated with carrier tones outside the audible frequency range?

I know that binaural beats are a controversial subject, as they might not work for everyone. In my own tests on myself I shuffled multiple recordings of binaural beats, with stereo headphones on, not ...
5
votes
1answer
711 views

Do we only hear what we want to hear?

When I Google this, the results are about misinterpreting what we hear to suit what we want or expect. However, I'm interested to know if we ignore specific things we hear and focus on things we are ...
5
votes
1answer
150 views

How do people respond to auditory warning signals?

I am working on a literature review of total reaction time to an auditory alert, in a transport context. All of the literature I can find about perception-response times are in the context of visual ...
5
votes
2answers
159 views

Inducing Auditory-to-Visual Synesthesia

I recently watched an interesting video that was discussing conveying color to the blind through language. It implied that there may be a way to insert the sensation of color into a person's mind via ...
5
votes
1answer
190 views

Do non-human primates exhibit the Kiki/Bouba effect?

After understanding that cats cannot experience the Kiki/Bouba effect, I wonder if smart non-human primates can experience it. There is evidence suggesting that Chimpanzees associate high pitch with ...
5
votes
1answer
212 views

Any link between IQ and a person's ability to create or mimic sounds?

Reading some articles about animals and speech, and it just brushes a bit of the neurology of it, but that got me curious: Is there any link between a person's (or an animal's) mimicry skill and/or ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Does music affect heart-rate?

I've read that the body attempts to match its heart-rate with the tempo of music being listened to. Rhythmic Entrainment: 'This refers to a process whereby an emotion is evoked by a piece of ...
5
votes
1answer
533 views

Sensory dissonance: Will the visual or auditory channel win?

Is there any research showing that our visual channel takes precedence over the auditory channel (or vice versa) if there is some dissonance between them? Examples: Say a person driving a car ...
5
votes
0answers
455 views

What are the brain regions related to tinnitus shown in this figure?

I am interested in learning about the neural mechanisms behind tinnitus, and was wondering if someone could help me to name the parts of the brain on this image that show increased activity in ...
4
votes
1answer
132 views

How can someone asleep recognize a very brief sound?

I have a snoring girlfriend. To interrupt her snoring, I make a sound similar to the very brief sound gas makes when opening a soda can or bottle (had a snoring brother, I know this technique works ...
4
votes
2answers
357 views

Can people with absolute pitch identify the exact frequency, or simply the pitch class?

Absolute pitch can be defined as the ability to identify or re-create a given musical note without the benefit of a reference tone. When people claim to have absolute pitch, does this mean they have ...
4
votes
1answer
73 views

Hearing Loss and Potentially hearing more

I've been diagnosed since I was younger (2nd grade) with a hearing impairment. Basically the nerve hairs on my cochlea are burned and I don't pick up 70% of the frequencies around me in my right ear. ...
4
votes
1answer
521 views

Why do psychologists tend to associate guilt with auditory admonition?

Can you please expound the sentence that I marked with red lines? The green underlie refers to Wolfram Eberhard's 1967 book Guilt and Sin in Traditional China, page 12. But my library is closed ...
4
votes
1answer
110 views

How do certain frequencies of sound induce psychological states?

As one example, a specific low frequency beyond our hearing perception can make people feel nauseous and even vomit. I'm sure there are more documented studies surrounding the correlation of auditory ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Proportion of cortex dedicated for vision and hearing

I have read in some websites that the percentage of the cortex devoted to processing visual information is from 30-66% with some claiming even 90%. And compared to that, only about 3% is dedicated to ...
4
votes
1answer
155 views

How effective are high audio frequencies in commercials in getting audience attention?

Does anyone know of a peer reviewed article that describes how commercials will often contain high audio frequencies in order to attract the viewer's attention? Referrals to commercials using any ...
4
votes
0answers
82 views

Why can good music raise goosebumps?

Listening to really good music right now, I was wondering why it raises goosebumps. Is there any physiological reason for this reaction to specific wavelengths or something? Due sometimes strong ...
3
votes
3answers
192 views

Acoustic and light wave coherency?

I know how some music notes combinations sound pleasing, yet others do not. Does the same occur with different frequencies of light (colors)? Since spectral color and acoustic pitch are both defined ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between noise reduction and noise cancellation?

I had a question about sirens in another section which led to a question in physics section...and I was told my question is more suitable for cognitive science. So here it goes: There are many kinds ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

Is Tinnitus caused by damage to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) or Auditory Cortex, which can be repaired?

It is well known that loud noises can lead to hearing problems such as temporary hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and even permanent hearing loss. But this is the first time scientists ...
3
votes
1answer
559 views

What hardware setup is commonly used for low-latency audio stimulation?

I need to carefully control the latency and timing of auditory stimulation in an upcoming experiment. Some of this depends on software, but my question is specifically relating to hardware, drivers ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

Is speech perceived as set of phonemes by human?

I am currently trying to understand how speech is being perceived and understood. I am currently aware of the workings of inner ears and the basilar membrane and its frequency filtering, but going ...
3
votes
2answers
41 views

How to prime gammatone filters?

A set of gammatone band-pass filters are often used to model the filtering performed by the human inner ear. For example, "BatSLAM: Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using Biomimetic Sonar" Jan ...
3
votes
1answer
293 views

Dichotic listening tasks and crosstalk

In a dichotic listening task where participants listen to different (frequency-wise) musical tones through headphones, is cross talk to the contralateral cochlea of each ear through bone conduction a ...