Questions tagged [cross-modal]

For questions regarding the perception of stimuli that combine two or more sensory modalities.

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5
votes
1answer
137 views

Do non-human primates exhibit the Kiki/Bouba effect?

After understanding that cats cannot experience the Kiki/Bouba effect, I wonder if smart non-human primates can experience it. There is evidence suggesting that Chimpanzees associate high pitch with ...
5
votes
1answer
194 views

Do cats exhibit the bouba/kiki effect?

I was fascinated when I first read Ramachandran's article about kiki bouba effect, and I was wondering if cats experience the same thing... As Ramachandran proved, our angular gyrus is responsible for ...
4
votes
1answer
840 views

When a person starts to scratch, why does this often start others to scratch?

Often, when a person starts scratching and complains of being itchy, whether they suggest there might be a bug biting them (for example fleas, head lice, mites) another person with them will start to ...
11
votes
2answers
585 views

Which are the multisensory brain areas?

What would be an example of a multisensory brain area, where multiple senses (e.g. smell and taste) are combined to decode the corresponding stimuli from more than one sensory organ? I was thinking ...
3
votes
0answers
26 views

Can abstract object representations be associated with a wider range of sounds in comparison to everyday object representations?

I'm looking for some peer reviewed evidence that abstract visuals can be associated with a wide range of sounds when compared to more recognisable visual representations pertaining to everyday objects....
28
votes
1answer
797 views

The effects of bilingualism on colour perception

Peltola et al. (2012) showed that there are two types of bilinguals. Balanced bilinguals mix their two languages and are effected by linguistic categories from both. Dominant bilinguals seem to ...
20
votes
1answer
226 views

Does self-directed speech help or hurt a blind subject's auditory recognition?

Recently, it was found that self-directed speech was helpful to sighted subjects engaging in a visual search task: Participants searched for common objects, while being sometimes [sic] asked to ...