Questions tagged [cognitive-psychology]

For questions focusing on the interaction of many internal mental processes. If your question involves only one of memory, attention, language, decision-making, or perception then use the associated specialized tag instead of cognitive-psychology.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
72 votes
4 answers
7k views

What makes people easily subscribe to pseudoscientific theories?

There are many theories/disciplines that have been categorized as pseudoscience in the scientific community. The list includes many things that are regularly even quoted in media like graphology, ...
Bharadwaj Srigiriraju's user avatar
45 votes
8 answers
13k views

What is the current "accepted" science behind dream interpretation?

I'm doing some casual reading about dream interpretation (meaning I'm reading the wikipedia entry) and the article mentions that there are several ways of thinking about dreams from a psychological ...
Rahul's user avatar
  • 559
18 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is "brain training" effective?

We've had quite a few questions about "brain training" on this site (see questions tagged brain-training). And the effectiveness of "brain training" has been touched on in several questions (this ...
Jeromy Anglim's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
299 views

What are the main theories that account for why some people like X and others not?

For example, how does psychology account for why some people like peanuts and others hate them? This is a serious question, although perhaps naive. Sure, there can be some physiological explanations ...
Teusz's user avatar
  • 249
37 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is multitasking a myth?

Often, the term 'multitasking' is applied to very busy and 'wired' people. There is an adage that women multitask better than men. My question is, do we actually multitask? If so, what are the ...
user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
336 views

Is post-traumatic stress disorder preventable?

Victims of abuse, people exposed to violent situations repeatedly, and people in war zones can develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result. PTSD is very common and has lifelong effects ...
Ella's user avatar
  • 111
8 votes
3 answers
725 views

What is the psychological term for disregarding correct but unwanted information?

Sometimes people seem to be very resistant to information that is in conflict with prior beliefs, even when this new information is very plausible. For example, a patient might change a doctor, ...
CuriousSuperhero's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
628 views

Word for naming your negative self-talk to overcome it

I'm trying to find some research - or at least a professional analysis - on the concept of naming your negative self-talk so that you can "take away its power" - that is, separate it from yourself and ...
ImitationLlama's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
4k views

Which is the scientific name of stubbornness?

Some people are stubborn, with strong, absolute beliefs, and it's really hard to change the ideas. They tend to see just the evidence that confirms their ideas. What is the scientific name of this ...
Revious's user avatar
  • 1,429
12 votes
2 answers
4k views

What is the most comprehensive system of describing human emotions or states of mind?

Reading about the human mind, I sometimes come across attempts to classify human emotions using various scales. The one that comes to mind most often is the 6 scale circle model shown below. Is ...
Alex Stone's user avatar
  • 9,390
6 votes
1 answer
231 views

Standard Academic set of emotions, and cognitive functions

As far as modern psychology is concerned, do we have a "standard" set of emotions agreed upon by academics? For example, happiness, anger, sadness, etc. Is there a single list that contains all ...
Mind_Half_Full 's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
163 views

What is the name of a cognitive bias by which existing facts are tailored to fit a personal hypothesis?

What is the name of a cognitive bias where a person takes all of their knowledge of a particular subject (at a point in time) and arranges it in a hypothesis or world model that makes sense to that ...
Alex Stone's user avatar
  • 9,390
60 votes
5 answers
34k views

Does evidence support Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs?

Maslow's Heirarchy of Needs (shown below) is a popular concept and is often taught in basic psychology courses, and often less objectively taught in Business and Marketing courses. A common problem ...
Ben Brocka's user avatar
  • 9,836
34 votes
2 answers
215k views

How valid is Lumosity's Brain Performance Index and what normative information is available?

Background There is a test called Lumosity's Brain Performance Index. A sample profile of scores might be: ...
40pro's user avatar
  • 451
3 votes
1 answer
145 views

How to refer to the phenomenon of people only absorbing evidence which confirms their beliefs?

I knew a psychologist who was calling it self-referentiality. People are always trying to see only the sentence which confirm their beliefs. What's the correct name for this?
Revious's user avatar
  • 1,429
33 votes
4 answers
73k views

Why do you sometimes write down one word while actually intending to write another?

I've caught myself writing (typing) "possible" instead of "possibly" a few times over the past few days, while I do intend to write "possibly". Only upon rereading the sentence I notice my mistake. ...
Steven Jeuris's user avatar
  • 3,523
29 votes
1 answer
3k views

Is there psychoactive music?

Listen to this music for X minutes to observe Y result. Is there something like that that has been demonstrated to work for general public? The only example of an experiment that is similar that ...
Alex Stone's user avatar
  • 9,390
21 votes
1 answer
3k views

How well can a human-generated "random number" be predicted?

For example, if i ask an individual to write a 20-number-long sequence of random numbers from 0 to 10. How well can I predict the 20th number from the initial 19? More generally, How well can ...
Sergey Shpad's user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
13k views

Is there a reasonable scientific backing for Carl Jung's type theories?

I have read a lot on how most psychologists reject the Myers Briggs Type Indicator for its lack of scientific backing, but I have yet to find much information on the acceptance of Carl Jung's theories,...
Nathan BeDell's user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
399 views

Does chess enhance cognitive abilities?

Some texts advise playing chess with children and mature people. Should I take them seriously, and why should chess boost intellect? For instance, I would like to be able to read and understand ...
Little Alien's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
422 views

Why do participants prefer to give input values that are "round numbers"?

Background I have just been analysing some data where participants attempt to control a dynamic system with integer numeric inputs between 0 and 100. I've noticed that there is a general tendency for ...
Jeromy Anglim's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
367 views

Are psychologists more immune to psychological problems?

Does knowledge of a psychological problem prevent (or enable one to better defend) the development of psychological issues? For example, if a person has studied about depression and is familiar with ...
kevin's user avatar
  • 201
8 votes
1 answer
515 views

What are the neural substrates of retrieval induced forgetting?

Retrieval-induced effects It is well known that practicing retrieval of remembered items increases the probability of correctly recalling that item in future tests: the testing effect. Retrieval-...
Christian Hummeluhr's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
302 views

Does fixing cognitive biases do more harm than use?

The Kahneman–Tversky interpretation of biases as deviation from rationality was challenged by Gigerenzer on the basis that heuristics help making decisions and, thus, rational from the evolutionary ...
Anton Tarasenko's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
659 views

What is it called to think without language? Are there studies around it?

I think there are two types of thinking: with and without language. For my entire life, in my opinion, I have always thought without language. Some people say it's impossible and that we think with ...
Enoque Duarte's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
7k views

Comprehensive list of cognitive techniques in CBT

I'm not a cognitive science student, but I'm interested in CBT (Cognitive Behavior Therapy) and I'm using it to overcome some of the problems I have. However, I have difficulty in finding resources ...
Saeed Neamati's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there a difference between physiological stimulations and psychological stimulations?

From what I understand, physiological stimulation (or stimulus or sensation) "refers to sensory excitation, the action of various agents or forms of energy (stimuli) on receptors that generate ...
Ooker's user avatar
  • 1,771
3 votes
1 answer
128 views

Can calmness happen during the fight-flight response?

In the question How do certain individuals, like Quang Duc, develop the ability to remain calm when enduring significant nociceptive pain?, one answer says that it was the high level of cortisol that ...
Ooker's user avatar
  • 1,771
22 votes
5 answers
3k views

Why are people inclined to praise or fear the unknown?

Human beings are inclined to "praise" the unknown, and are often afraid of the unknown. This inclination has led to the creation of mythology and many gods. To this date we are still carrying this ...
Özgür's user avatar
  • 661
20 votes
4 answers
11k views

What is the primary source of the "mount stupid" graphic?

Online descriptions of the Dunning-Kruger effect are often accompanied by a "mount stupid" graphic similar to the below - from a Psychology Today article: However, the research paper does not contain ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
  • 19.6k
12 votes
1 answer
424 views

Cognitive models for transfer of skills

Recently a question was asked about the benefit of playing chess on cognitive abilities. More specifically, how chess would improve understanding technical texts. Many other questions are also focused ...
Robin Kramer-ten Have's user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
1k views

Research on aversion to cognitive effort?

I was reading Danny K's recent book for fun (Thinking Fast and Slow, 2011), and he suggests briefly that some people's reliance on their intuitions (i.e., "System 1") might sometimes indicate a sort ...
mrt's user avatar
  • 4,388
10 votes
3 answers
3k views

Name of cognitive bias that causes experts to overestimate their ability in other areas?

Is there a name for a cognitive bias that causes people who have been successful in one area to be overconfident in their level of knowledge / ability in another unrelated area? It's related to the ...
duffx's user avatar
  • 101
10 votes
1 answer
541 views

What cognitive processes occur during a mental exhaustion or 'burnout'?

Mental burnout - or mental exhaustion is not very pleasant, when one feels completely overwhelmed, something 'snaps' and it is hard to concentrate and maintain motivation. What are the cognitive ...
user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
7k views

Does practicing Ravens Progressive Matrices tests inflate your IQ score?

I'm 16 years old and a year ago I got obsessed about IQ. I took a Raven IQ test and scored 115. Then during the autumn and winter of last year I took some more IQ tests using RPM and scored 126 on ...
ultraboss101's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
357 views

Is there a term for a person who moves from one field of expertise to a new field and has an inflated belief in their competence in the new field?

Person A has led a successful career and is very well renowned in field A. Later in life, person A moves to field B, a field they're curious about but have very little experience in. Person A ...
bodacious's user avatar
  • 203
6 votes
0 answers
164 views

Why do certain activities seem to co-occur with well learnt skills?

I have found that when I do certain activities, while engaged with them, I am inclined to do other activities, as well, which come naturally and do not seem to break productivity of the first ones, ...
drabsv's user avatar
  • 945
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a difference between visual short term memory and visual working memory?

As far as I can tell the two terms are used interchangeably. Do these two separate terms exist for historical reasons, or is there a distinction I'm missing?
Louis Thibault's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
992 views

Does the brain have a 'debugging mode'?

In computer programming we have a debugger that we can use to execute a program step by step. In that mode, the program can be suspended and we can analyze the state of the hardware, modify the state ...
erdal.karaca's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
334 views

Brainwave audio recordings and beta waves: how do they affect positivity?

I know a little bit about negative and positive energies of human bodies and how it all works. Recently, on Facebook, I saw an ad promoting some sort of audio recording and that it has something to do ...
Sufiyan Ghori's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
834 views

Brain Right hemisphere is random and left hemisphere is linear? really?

For long I've seen uncountable number of blogs, websites, tutorials, booklets about career-guide, self-improvement, meditation, parenting etc. claiming; "Right hemisphere loves to work random, ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
425 views

Any research on brain's processes involved in evil actions? [closed]

I'm reading Zimbardo's The lucifer effect: understanding how good people turn to evil in which he describes the famous Stanford prison experiment that investigated the psychological effects of ...
Fil's user avatar
  • 1,524
1 vote
2 answers
167 views

Where would a cognitively separated person get their brain signals excited from?

I suppose there's nothing wrong about the idea that a cognitively separated person could cognitively function as anybody else. But brain as I understand it always needs a potential from some sense. If ...
Probably's user avatar
  • 305
61 votes
1 answer
15k views

By learning to read and write upside down, what did I do to myself?

If you've ever read Encyclopedia Brown books, you'll be familiar with the backwards writing in the back of the book that explains the solution to the case. When I was in my mid-late teens (I don't ...
Wayne Werner's user avatar
24 votes
2 answers
17k views

Is it possible to think in a second language?

Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. This is common with more "complex" ...
CoonKitteh's user avatar
21 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why do people fear statistically unlikely things?

Over 10 times more people die in circulatory diseases than accidents (source). Nevertheless people (in general) fear accidents more than circulatory disease. There are statistically even more ...
CuriousSuperhero's user avatar
18 votes
2 answers
875 views

Does any evidence show that Smartphone users have poorer memory?

An ages old complaint is that new technology harms memory. Why remember something when you can look it up? In a course on Human Memory I distinctly recall an interesting discussion on phones and ...
Ben Brocka's user avatar
  • 9,836
18 votes
1 answer
3k views

How is a young child able to learn language so easily?

It's a well known fact that the earlier children are exposed to languages the better, as young children have a better ability to learn new languages than adults. Why is this? At what age does a ...
Josh's user avatar
  • 5,390
16 votes
1 answer
70k views

Why do some days feel fast and others feel slow?

As per the title, why is it some days it just feels like a day can go so fast, yet other days can feel slow? Every day has the same amount of hours, minutes and seconds after all. What is the actual ...
Daveo's user avatar
  • 263
16 votes
5 answers
4k views

Is psychology a science?

I've read some books from behavioral economy to emotional intelligence, and it kind of makes sense, but when it comes to psychology it feels to me a bit like astrology, where there are some things ...
rraallvv's user avatar
  • 549