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I'm reading the wikipedia article on sublimation. The article says:

In psychology, sublimation is a mature type of defense mechanism where socially unacceptable impulses or idealizations are consciously transformed into socially acceptable actions or behavior, possibly resulting in a long-term conversion of the initial impulse.

But it's not clear to me how these impulses are transformed. Are these impulses transformed inside the mind of the one who do them or are they transformed in a social level (via persuasion)?

Rephrasing the question: Does him argue with himself and make himself believe that the unacceptable behavior is actually a good thing or succeeds to persuade others to believe that behavior is a good thing?

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Sublimation is a term from psychoanalytic theory. In short, the internatlized norms - the so-called Super-Ego - directs the drives to outlets that are free of guilt or shame. The whole process takes place inside the individual, and in fact the norms that individual has internalized (in his childhood) need not be identical to the norms that the adult person is surrounded by.

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Awh I've used that word before to describe the state of my illness. Sublimation in my case would mean mostly subsyndromal but still under treatment. That is to say the probability that something bad could happen like symptom recurrence or new disease emergence is not 0 due to the nature of the illness being lifelong but treatment continues and as issues of the mind present themself they are resolved through psychological and psychiatric techniques.

So its impossible to answer your rephrased question without knowing the exact person and their intention. I would imagine that is your interpretation rather than theirs. Should someone experience such an internal battle and deciding abnormality is normality they should seek immediate medical treatment as its not necessary and potentially harmful.

If this word was again used as I used it by someone like minded I would suggest instead that this individual seeks not to justify his abnormality but seeks to acknowledge his rationality about his abnormality and his potential greater than normal sanity due to constant correction which is lacking in most sick but untreated and yet labeled sane individuals. As I think everyone knows and freud so intended the war for a long, healthy, rational life is not won by the idle but those who actively engage in the treatment of their individual brand of abnormal physical or mental humanity.

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