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Trying to change my own music preferences, because I've changed as a person and now only feel disgust with all the music I've liked in the past (not relevant here), I've been looking into research on music preferences.

From what I've read, in summary, our musical tastes are dictated to us when we're growing up. We'll forever like the music we did when we were young no matter what. This also cements our tastes. This means whatever music you listen to when you're young, you're condemned to only like that music. If you weren't into rock when you were young, for example, you never will be after you've aged past a point.

Does this mean that people like me are forever condemned to only be able to enjoy music we now despise? In my own experience, I've been unable to find any other music that I actually enjoy. It seems all I enjoy is the stuff I always have, despite the fact that I desperately want to change it. Does my own experience prove this? Are our musical tastes set in stone forever after we've aged past a certain point? I really feel sorry for ex-racists, since this means they can no longer enjoy any music at all due to the bigoted music the listened to when they were younger. Damn that must suck. I've also read about people who liked glam metal when it was in its prime. I was trying to find out how they moved past that, but apparently older ones rarely do. They still listen to the same shit to this very day (though younger ones normally prefer grunge apparently) despite its moral depravity and the stigma it always brings. Elders also always seem to only listen to music from ages long past. Seems no one listens only to new music except the young. Everyone gets stuck forever only being able to enjoy the music they did when they were young. Does that mean people like me, or anyone trying to change their musical tastes later in life, can simply never enjoy music again?

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