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To speed up time my efficiency on the computer, I had started to use key bindings. These are some keys you press together and you'll directly get a desired result. One common one I use is the windows snipping bind: logo key+ shift +S. I have often found it that, I am able to retrive the binding when I'm deep in work and doing tasks, but not able to when I directly try to retrive the the key binding of it from memory by active thinking.

Why is this?

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Motor tasks like key pressing are a form of procedural memory. This is an unconscious form of memory that doesn't require awareness in your conscious mind. Even if you start with a conscious understanding, as you repeat the task you're creating a procedural memory, and it's no longer necessary to recall the initial declarative memory. These different types of memory are stored in different brain/CNS areas.

The same is true for all motor actions you do: when you throw a ball or walk, you don't think about which specific muscles you need to flex or relax at any given moment, and given all the postural movements involved you'd really not be able to, there are dozens of muscles involved in any action.

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  • $\begingroup$ Shouldn't the CNS acronym be defined?. "These different types of memory are stored in different brain/CNS areas." Can we have a source or 2 where we can learn about where different types of procedural memory are stored? $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 6:06

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