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I searched for the word "inhibition" in Google dictionary and here is the result: "a feeling that makes one self-conscious and unable to act in a relaxed and natural way." It doesn't make sense to me. Can someone explain this to me? To me, it seems exactly the opposite.

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    $\begingroup$ It's not very clear what exactly you're asking, because "inhibition" is indeed used in multiple ways in neuroscience. One is related to behavior, the other is related to neurotransmission. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Oct 20, 2022 at 14:30
  • $\begingroup$ I think this question is more of an English Language question so it is more on topic in say, English Language and Usage or English Language Learners. If you look at the synonyms provided by Google and example word usage, it matches what @BryanKrause said and the answer provided. You have to lose your inhibitions to act in a relaxed way because inhibitions hamper actions for various reasons. $\endgroup$ Oct 21, 2022 at 5:01

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Neurotransmitters can broadly be categorised as excitatory or inhibitory (+ modulatory):

Excitatory neurotransmitters act to depolarise the synaptic membrane thus increasing the likelihood that an impulse will travel across the synapse.

Inhibitory neurotransmitters act to maintain membrane polarisation, decreasing the likelihood of an impulse being forwarded.

A post-synaptic inhibitory potential affects the post-synaptic neuron acting to decrease the likelihood of an impulse traveling down it.

So, inhibit or inhibitory in this sense would refer to decreasing or damping-down of activity at some specific place in the nervous system, whereas excitatory would increase that activity. (Or sometimes having a broader more general effect, depending on the specifics.)

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