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I have been through several texts and many papers and have written my own neuron simulator. I don't understand how a hundred neurons working in the millisecond range could do the work required for cognition. I cannot find a biological mechanism in the brain that could account for our awareness of the last 100 mSec or so.

Neurons operate in the millisecond range, but how many would have to be in play to give us even the slightest knowledge of human speech as it arrives at our ears?

I have added these links to my search for this question and to the neuron simulator I created to aid in my understanding.

https://www.seti.net/index.php and

https://www.seti.net/Neuron%20Lab/3.%20Neuron%20Simulator/Neuron%20Simulator.php

Could it be that many sets of 100 working in a Synfire Chain and with Spike Timing Dependency Plasticity (STDP) might do it, but it still seems sketchy? I understand that we are not aware of the last 100 mSec, but our brain must work to keep us unaware at least. Are there any other options?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to psych.SE. I'm not sure I understand the question - it would help if you provided some background material (ie, what reading have you done about this yourself?). My understanding is that we are not aware of the last 100msec or so - see "specious present", and this question for example. $\endgroup$
    – Arnon Weinberg
    Oct 3, 2022 at 19:54
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Arnon. I have been through several Texts and many papers and have written my own neuron simulator. I don't understand how a hundred neurons working in the millisecond range could do the work required for cognition. It could be that many sets of 100 working in a Synfire Chain and with Spike Timing Dependency Plasticity (STDP) might do it, but it still seems sketchy. I understand that we are not aware of the last 100 mSec but our brain must work to keep us unaware at least. Are there any other options? $\endgroup$
    – Seti Net
    Oct 4, 2022 at 5:19
  • $\begingroup$ If you are asking how our brain keeps us unaware of the delay, then you are asking about the binding problem, as mentioned in the post I linked to: "The binding problem is considered a "problem" due to the fact that no complete model exists." $\endgroup$
    – Arnon Weinberg
    Oct 4, 2022 at 6:01
  • $\begingroup$ Certainly an interesting set of papers. The thing that baffles me is how units (neurons) that operate so slowly (~ 5 mSec min) can be configured to solve problems that must take many thousands working together to get answers in the 100 mSec range. It would be like strapping a thousand Telsas to the landing gear of a 747 with no engines. No matter how many you hook on, they could not reach the 250 MPH take-off speed. The Teslas parallel well but series poorly. Same with neurons. $\endgroup$
    – Seti Net
    Oct 5, 2022 at 5:25
  • $\begingroup$ I think you've kind of already answered your bafflement in your own comment: neurons in brains are organized in a massively parallel fashion. If you're thinking of neural computations as happening mostly in series you're probably thinking about it wrong. Of course, it's very difficult for humans to comprehend this. For your original question, I think you're likely approaching what is called the "hard problem" of consciousness. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Oct 6, 2022 at 19:53

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