4
$\begingroup$

Can somnambulism be self-induced? By "self-induced" I mean when a person starts in the waking state, induces sleep, and then takes themselves down into a deep sleep where somnambulism occurs, not when they start in the waking state and induce lucid dreaming in REM sleep.

George Estabrooks opens Chapter 3 of his book Hypnotism (1943) by saying

"There is a rule in hypnotism that everything we get in trance can also be obtained by means of the post-hypnotic suggestion. Also, that anything we find in either can be found in autosuggestion".

That would include somnambulism, a phenomenon that is found in deep trance, which can of course be induced by hypnotism, but he does not actually say anything about how this phenomenon in particular can result from autosuggestion, or give any examples.

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Just noting that hypnosis (though not necessarily hypnotherapy) is generally considered pseudoscience. This makes this question impossible to answer, as there is no way to reliably distinguish these various states. $\endgroup$
    – Arnon Weinberg
    Apr 21, 2022 at 23:35
  • $\begingroup$ @ArnonWeinberg - 1/2 - I find your comment extremely confused. Hypnosis is not generally considered "pseudoscience"; the Wikipedia page you link to does not support that view (all it says is that either currently or in the past it has been so characterised "by academics or researchers"); the distinction between "science" & "pseudoscience" does not matter to this question; a fortiori a choice of 1 of those 2 characterisations would not make the question impossible to answer; [cont.] $\endgroup$
    – user25226
    Apr 22, 2022 at 12:12
  • $\begingroup$ 2/2 - [cont.] somnambulism (sleepwalking) has for millennia been a known "state" that differs from both the waking state & normal sleep; and nowadays it is known to occur usually during deep (stage 3) non-REM sleep. It is easy to gen up on the distinctions between different stages of sleep, which today's scientists define by EEG patterns. It was surely not necessary for me to refer to this in a question posted on an "expert Q&A" site asking for light to be thrown on a statement made in a book about hypnotism by a chair of Colgate University's psychology department who specialised in that area. $\endgroup$
    – user25226
    Apr 22, 2022 at 12:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ That's right, it was not necessary. However, if I understand the question correctly, suppose someone is sleepwalking, then we need to be able to tell (eg, using EEG) not only that they are in fact asleep, but also why it happened - ie, did it happen "naturally", or as a result of hypnosis, or due to autosuggestion. So, if you can provide a reference showing the standard by which you wish to tell apart "trance", "post-hypnotic", and "self-induced/autosuggested", from "normal" state using whatever instrument, independently from sleep state, then the question becomes potentially answerable. $\endgroup$
    – Arnon Weinberg
    Apr 22, 2022 at 15:46

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.