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Imagine a person that is paralysed because the connection between the motor region in the cortex and the motor apparatus in the body (neurons) is comprised.

What happens to the neurons that were actively involved in bodily motion when this person was not yet paralysed?

Will they continue to do what they always did?
Will they know that the body is out of reach and start doing other things?

I can imagine that they don't receive feedback from the body and thereby know that they are not needed anymore so they might go in in different processes.

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  • $\begingroup$ I guess by "the connection between the motor region in the cortex and the motor apparatus in the body (neurons)" you meant upper motor neuron circuits, right? It is important to distinguish between upper and lower motor neurons injuries. The upper motor neurons injury (probably the one you asked about) doesn't lead to complete paralysis in a way that while the signals from the brain cannot now reach the muscles (upper motor neurons affected), the lower motor circuits are still intact, so there should still be some reflexes left. Due to the lack of movement muscle atrophy will follow. Lower mot $\endgroup$ Sep 1 at 22:14

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