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I read somewhere about a psychological phenomenon where one is not able to finish a task in time as the entire time is spent in looking for a better or optimum version of a solution - but can't remember the term now.

Can someone please suggest whats it called?

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    $\begingroup$ This sounds like perfectionism $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Jun 16 at 9:22
  • $\begingroup$ We know from the "invisible gorilla experiment" that perception is variable. What aim at determines what we see. What we focus on. What we filter out. It's entirely possible that 2 different people have different definitions of the term "finish". You may think that the perfectionist never finishes but he may think that your solution is not finished. For example, were the COVID-19 vaccines "finished" before they were made available for use? $\endgroup$ – Alex Ryan Jul 26 at 3:00
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I think the word you're looking for is 'Indecision'. There isn't one cause, certainly perfectionism is one cause, there can be one or many. See below for an article from Psychology Today which goes into further detail:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/counseling-keys/201707/uncovering-hidden-causes-indecision

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    $\begingroup$ As pointed out in this meta post, Psychology Today does not strictly provide reliable evidence for answers. Are you able to provide something more reliable (journal articles or something else which cites research)? $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Jun 20 at 8:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ChrisRogers Say what you will about Psychology Today but the author of that article is Kimberley Key, Ph.D, a board-certified counselor, psychotherapist and mediator with her doctoral training and M.A. in marriage and family therapy and counselling & educational psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno (CACREP accredited) and Alliant International University (COAMFTE accredited). Its safe to assume she didn't pluck her facts out of thin air. $\endgroup$ – NetServOps Jun 20 at 8:04
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    $\begingroup$ While I am not wishing to cast aspersions on the PT article, anyone can write an uncited article while hiding behind their PhD or 2 along with their position within the field. All answers here require reputable links and in this time of false information on the internet, nothing can be corroborated with uncited articles. $\endgroup$ – Chris Rogers Jun 20 at 8:14

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