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I know I have included a lot of sub-questions. So any partial answer addressing only parts of the question is also appreciated.

After seeing a recent post, I came to wonder the possible effects of putting up a social media post on some sad recent life event on the uploader's mental condition. As a non-psychology student, I realise my wording may be a bit vague, so I hope the following examples may help.

Suppose a guy has had a recent breakup in a romantic relationship, and puts up a social media post about it. Or for example, when someone's dear one has recently died, and then the person posts a paragraph/ picture expressing his grief on maybe Facebook or Instagram, or Tweets about it. Or maybe such a post is put up after a job loss.

Would this activity make the person feel better (compared to when people don't put up a post), however 'feeling better' is defined (I would be interested in knowing this too)?

My common sense understanding is that both sides of the argument can be defended. On the one hand, the social media post helps the person release the emotions and at least gives some sense that there is support. So it may help. On the other hand, repeated notifications of comments and reactions of people would only keep on reminding the person of the loss, and make it difficult to forget. So in this case it may hurt. But I understand common sense is often not a good guide to psychology.

I am interested in empirical papers that address this issue. Do the effects differ from culture to culture, is it dependent on age, or class? Also, are there different ways of measuring mental wellbeing that yield different results? Also, if a person often posts on social media to feel better after sad events, will there be an effect on the person's ability to cope with sad events without the help of social media?

I am comfortable with Statistics, Econometrics and also some Psychometric methods, so technical papers are also welcome.

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    $\begingroup$ All the examples are grieving situations and one person's experience of grief can be very different to another. For some, posting on social media can be cathartic on its own and some may only receive benefit from the support friends provide through comments. I will try and put a cited answer together when I have some time to put it together. $\endgroup$ May 24 '21 at 7:51

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